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Glulam beam and post finishing HELP!!

Haese56's picture

I am in a bind. Our contractor put Columbia vynil acrylic latex base on a glulam beam and post. It dried milky white instead of clear. He tried to sand it off then put on minwax poly crilic clear but it still looks blotchy. A painter friend advising us via phone says he thinks a tinted product could be applied to even it out. The beam is 15' up so it's not like a cabinet, still we want it to look decent. Making things worse this is part of the drywall paint process which has to get done before we can move in so we are in a camper so we don't want to drag things out. We'd like to fix it now but later would be ok. We do not want a dark finish on the wood. Is there something we can apply over thenpolycrilic  or do we have to sand down to bare wood and start over. Winter is HERE in Alaska....help!!!

All I can say is that you (post #207046, reply #1 of 6)

All I can say is that you probably have temperature and humidity working against you.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

glulam and post repair (post #207046, reply #2 of 6)

Why dont you cut your losses and just glue some 1/4 inch plywood on the glulam, you can get it in any species.  You can prefinish it before you put it up to any color or stain you wish.  There are also real wood post covers that can be painted or stained available, I've seen them advertised in Fine Woodworking Magazine.  You are doing so much worrying and asking for solutions and not getting anything accomplished.  Cover it and finish it to your satisfaction........done.

Wally

wally (post #207046, reply #3 of 6)

The downside to any sheetgoods is the limit of 8'.  Fine for post covers, but the seaming on a longer beam that will look good is a big problem.

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What about the veneer rolls? (post #207046, reply #4 of 6)

What about the veneer rolls?  I don't know if gluelam is flat enough though.

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You could use prefinished (post #207046, reply #5 of 6)

You could use prefinished hardwood flooring (real or simulated).  Then the joints would look "normal".


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Yes you could use prefinished flooring....... (post #207046, reply #6 of 6)

But it would look like prefinished flooring slapped up on a beam and to me that's a bogus look.  Much like using flooring as stair treads.   Ug-ly!

But to each his own.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/