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Hanging Drywall - placement of tapered edges

byrd48's picture

Hi,

I will be hanging drywall soon on a refurb and was wondering, in cases where you cannot use a full sheet and have to rip it lengthwise, where would you want to or not want to have cut edges joining.  I presume you want to use the tapered edges in the field as much as possible and use the cut edges in inside corners.  Do you use tapered edges for outside corners?  Just trying to get a rule of thumb to help me layout the pieces for installation.

byrd (post #207217, reply #1 of 17)

Sounds like you are going to hang the board vertical?

If so ,  sure, keep the bevels butting on themselves.  However, not at the expense of continually adding framing members to catch the edge.

It's ok to start a corner or finish one for that matter with a bevel.  You shouldn't have any problem.

 

There are those that swear by the butt taper (letting ends of board fly by framing, installing a wood "lath catcher" the has a taper behind the board-joining on that, the next board.  Supposed to make butting cut ends of board easier to tape and make disappear............

Millions of hangers and finishers don't think it's worth the time or effort.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Don't butt cut edges together or to the tapered edge. (post #207217, reply #2 of 17)

Keep the cut edges in the corners, whether wall to ceiling, wall to wall or wall to floor corners.  As Calvin says, tapered edge in the corner isn't a problem.

when hanging horizontally .... (post #207217, reply #3 of 17)

When hanging drywall horizontally on 9 foot walls, where do yo place teh one foot wide stripe?  In teh middle or at teh floor?

I have seen it mostly placed in teh middle.  I suppose that you can mud over the entire area (about two ffet wide) to blend it all in.

Howvever, I was wondering if you really want a tapered edge along the floor.  It seems to me that could be a pain when running base boards as they would tend to tip in toward teh wall at teh bottom.

.

do (post #207217, reply #4 of 17)

When hanging 9' walls, buy 54" board.

Yes, tapered on the bottom kicks in the base, but it's done EVERYWHERE.  I use a large dot of adhesive in the corners so that when the carpet guys stretch it, they don't push in the corner behind the cope.

If the bevel doesn't show on the surface, no one muds it flat.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


What do you mean? (post #207217, reply #9 of 17)

If teh bevel doesn't show on the surface,no one muds it falt?

.

do (post #207217, reply #12 of 17)

please type in english.

 

If teh bevel doesn't show on the surface,no one muds it falt?

 

What I mean is, if the baseboard covers the top of the beveled edge (which it usually does), then no-they don't mud that beveled area so it's flat and in plane with the surface of the drywall.

 

comprende'

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


What I've done in a couple of (post #207217, reply #13 of 17)

What I've done in a couple of cases is to drive a few drywall screws so they're proud the 3/16" or so needed to hold the base out.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Dan (post #207217, reply #14 of 17)

There's a bunch of tricks, most of which are a waste of time in the field of the wall-

the corners are the deal breakers-that's where I concentrate my fixes whatever method.

The bevels make up maybe an 1/8th inch hollow, but the finishers often start their corner tape/mud up off the floor (to keep from picking up "hitch-hikers" that pollute the mud and leave scrapes and lines in the finish) and this adds mud thickness well off the floor at about the top of the base.

So, even an eighth or the built up additional, leave the potential of either changing the angle of cut or backing up the base in the bottom corner.

Your screw system works, there's even some backer screws sold for that purpose (that you can draw out the base to tight fit the cope after it's set).  A blob of adhesive behind the butt cut 1st pc of base, will dry firm and keep that base tight to the cope.

Whatever it takes to keep the joints tight and eliminate the ugle gap or the finger pointing after the fact.

 

I've worked behind good finishers that take the extra seconds to run the corner to the floor and keep it sweet up the wall.

They're the same guys that build out the O.S. corners flat to the bead.

Absolutely hate to finish after the bogus guys-hell, the hangers don't bend over enough to get screws at each stud nor place any in the corners so that joint flops around...........

Good is good, bogus needs work to disguise.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Amen. (post #207217, reply #15 of 17)

Bad outside corners are worse to deal with than bad inside corners, IMHO.

Here's my take on the whole thing. (post #207217, reply #17 of 17)

Maybe it makes sense, maybe not.

Like in many things, if one part of the puzzle knew what the other part knew,

the end result would be better.

The demeanor of all parties would be better.

A true team effort.

 

Example-and there are many.

That outside corner............ if the finisher had framed corners before, maybe ran base at one time, and had laid down  floor..........yet still became very proficient at his / her craft and could finish like Michaelangelo.

The same applies to the rest of the crafts-know your part well, better than anyone else, but have the educational exposure of the rest of the house.

From foundation to final-the best of each trade, with the knowledge of the others involved.

Nir-stink'n-Vanna.

 

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Comprende (post #207217, reply #16 of 17)

Comprende.

.

I do have 9' walls in most of (post #207217, reply #5 of 17)

I do have 9' walls in most of the house, and that was going to be my next question, hang vertically with a 1' strip at the bottom, or horizontally with two horizontal seams, and still the 1' strip at the bottom.  I did not see any 54" drywall at the big box, maybe it's special order.  Most of the rooms in the house are less than 12' and I was considering getting the 12' drywall to limit the number of seams to mud.  But now I'm thinking it might be more trouble to hang and handle and I might be putting too much effort into avoiding some mud work

Definitely if you were a crew (post #207217, reply #6 of 17)

Definitely if you were a crew of pros doing a whole house you'd get the 54 and hang it horizontally.  But a 12' x 54 is heavy and awkward -- even with a lift it's too much for one man to handle in many cases.

(But do get the lift.  10' x 48 will be bad enough.)


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

We move a lot of the 54" (post #207217, reply #7 of 17)

We move a lot of the 54" drywall.  But I work as a "real" lumberyard. It doesn't fit in the racks at the bix box stores, so they don't keep it.

Personally, I would go with the 54" by 12' sheetrock. (post #207217, reply #8 of 17)

It's a two person job, and may be slow-going if you're not experienced, but it's definitely doable.  Order from a real lumber yard, if possible, and see if they will place it inside for you.

If using 4' sheetrock, consider installing the 1' piece next to the floor.  The real issue is the finishing.  An experienced finisher can make a butt seam or a cut-edge to tapered edge  look good, but it's a challenge for a newbie.  On the other hand, taping and floating a seam one foot off the floor is going to be hard on the back and knees.

  On a typical 7' 6" (post #207217, reply #10 of 17)

 

On a typical 7' 6" ceiling I always rip 2" off one tapered edge and install that edge down (to the floor ) then trim the top (butting the ceiling) as needed , this addresses the baseboard issue and leaves one taper to taper seam in the middle of the wall....or, on a taller ceiling (like yours)  I would rip the "filler" (12" approximately ) piece and install it cut edge down to the floor and finish with taper to taper up to the ceiling where you would cut the top tapered edge off and butt to the ceiling ......or rip the 2'' off the bottom taper (48" sheet) installing cut edge to floor, install second sheet (taper to taper ) and then cut filler (12" ) piece with cut edge to ceiling....it's  a choice of whether you prefer taping the second seam at the ceiling or at the floor .....your choice.
 I always rip the bottom edge taper off to get the flat surface for baseboard install ...but that's just my preference....

Geoff

Ceilings are pretty much all (post #207217, reply #11 of 17)

Ceilings are pretty much all 8-foot or better around here.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville