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height of vanity countertop

hammer's picture

After years of living with a low countertop in the master bath I started to fix the problem. First removed the 3'X5' mirror. used the trick mentioned here about using shims around the edges. Slow but surely it popped from the mastic.


The real problem is raising the vanity to block underneath it. One edge is tight to the corner and the other edge butted against the tub cabinet (2' tall) The kickplate has 1" of concrete then tile up against it. I removed the kickplate and had to cut all the screws on the ledger board and removed screws on the sides of the cabinet. Removed all the chalking around it and cut between the DW and backsplash. This vanity will move only 1/4" at a time but BINDS up on the opposite end. I'm levering it with 2X4's and can't believe the fight.


Any ideas how to raise it all at once (it's 6' long)


What is the standard height of a bath counter. I heard 32-34", is that what people are doing.

(post #80970, reply #1 of 11)

34" in higth...


lift it from the front and back instead of the left and right..


 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #80970, reply #2 of 11)

cut the drywall away from the binding points...

 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #80970, reply #3 of 11)

"Standard height is 32" - 34", but I make most vanities 36".  We older folks appreciate not having to bend over so much to brush our teeth - or at least those that we still have. - lol


You're fighting with the vanity and countertop and it's entirely possible that the wall slopes in which will bind you up as you try to raise it.  When (if?) you get it raised, you'll have to replumb the water lines and drain.  And, you'll have a pretty high toe kick area to cover up.


Are you sure you really want to raise the vanity?  Unless it's something really special, you would probably be better off replacing it.

(post #80970, reply #4 of 11)

I think part of the problem was the tile and base raised the floor higher and put the counter at 30" and with the mirror above the backsplash I can't see above my eyebrows. No more excuses to DW for not brushing my hair. I'll block it up at different heights and set it lower if it looks odd.


The vanity is nothing special, but replacing might only start a snowball for a full bath remodel.


 

(post #80970, reply #5 of 11)

I had one that the customer HAD to have moved up.  Cabinet was trapped by alot of nice tile work.  The top could be removed, and the couple extra tile they had could clean up below the new top.  But, not enough tile to patch in the rest around the cabinet.


Pulled the top and built up the lower and unmovable vanity.


Customer happy.


Tile happy.


Me?  Happy as I could have been.



A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



http://www.quittintime.com/


 


Edited 1/22/2008 4:38 pm ET by calvin

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


(post #80970, reply #6 of 11)

What is the standard height of a bath counter. I heard 32-34", is that what people are doing.


"Standard" vanity height cabinets are generally 30.5" tall, so an 1.5 countertop "hits" 32" AFF  It's an "industry" standard in the cabinet biz, so many use that.  Another "biz" convention is that vanity cabinets are either 21" or 18" deep, too.


A "base" height cabinet is 34.5" so that a 1.5" counter top "hits" 36" AFF for the same reason.


Now, some cabinet lines offer a 34.5" tall cabinet that is 21" (or 18") deep, giving a higher box to put the counter top on.


It's possible with some casework, to take a saw to it to adjust the depth and/or height to what ever you need, too ("flat pack" can be very handy that way).


Any ideas how to raise it all at once (it's 6' long)


Nope. 


I'm not sure I'd have gone to the effort you have so far--but a decade in the casework biz left me with no overwhelming "reflex" to save cabinets.  I'd likely just left the toe kick and dropped another new cabinet in the place of the old.  But, that's me, I'm jaded and cynical, and detailed one too many cabinets in my day.


Occupational hazard of my occupation not being around (sorry Bubba)
I may not be able to help you Occupational hazard of my occupation not being around (sorry Bubba)

(post #80970, reply #7 of 11)

Starter homes or kids bathrooms: ~32".


Mid priced homes: ~35 or 36"


High end homes - any darn height that the man/woman with the $$$ wants.

Matt

(post #80970, reply #8 of 11)

Raise it till you're happy and give your wife a stool for her birthday.

Bob's next test date: 12/10/07

(post #80970, reply #9 of 11)

Thanks for the suggestions.


I have it temporarily blocked up at 35". Will see if that works before I permanently install it. Extended the water supply lines and waste slip pipe. Also used a scissors jack and some blocking to raise and position it. So far it works well .


Need to re-invent the tall kick plate. Make it look intentional. Maybe a reverse cove and undercabinet light, etc.

(post #80970, reply #10 of 11)

On vanity heights, I generally think 34" to the top is the most comfortable for most of my customers. It's what I recommend in a master with a double-bowl vanity where you can't set his and hers at different heights.  For spec homes, my builder generally puts in 32" in guest baths and 36" in the masters.


I think 36" is just a bit high for the average woman. I'm not comfortable when I have to use that height on a daily basis. Plus, unless they're styled to look like furniture, those tall suckers can look really out of place in a smaller space.

(post #80970, reply #11 of 11)

Welcome to Breaktime.  Stick around.  We need some more design expertise.


thanks.


Please fill in your profile, it'll help us to understand where these ideas come from.



A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.


Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.



http://www.quittintime.com/


 


Edited 1/24/2008 6:54 pm ET by calvin

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/