Subscribe or Renew Membership Subscribe Renew

Ideas for a 3/8" drill guide for a jig

DanH's picture

I need to build a jig to drill about 100 holes in the ends of some pieces of 1x2, and do so with moderate accuracy.

I've sort of scaffolded it with a piece of 2x with a hole drilled in it, but that does not hold the (standard twist drill) bit real accurately, and each hole I make bores out the hole in the 2x a little wider.

Anyone have an idea for a somewhat more robust guide, ideally something that just happens to be a reasonably accurate 3/8" internal diameter?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Dan (post #215227, reply #1 of 8)

DanH wrote:

I need to build a jig to drill about 100 holes in the ends of some pieces of 1x2, and do so with moderate accuracy.

I've sort of scaffolded it with a piece of 2x with a hole drilled in it, but that does not hold the (standard twist drill) bit real accurately, and each hole I make bores out the hole in the 2x a little wider.

Anyone have an idea for a somewhat more robust guide, ideally something that just happens to be a reasonably accurate 3/8" internal diameter?

Have you tried the 3/8"drill bit from Kreg?  It might work in a hardwood block guide and not cam out the hole.  The centering tip on it might be the ticket.  Or a machine shop might help you with a metal guide block.

 

heres another Taunton trick of discouragement.  Reply button don't work on this iPad so had to use the quote button.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


How about using a Vix bit?  (post #215227, reply #2 of 8)

How about using a Vix bit?  Make your guide with a countersink that the Vix can rest in.  The countersink will keep the bit centered over the hole.  Or mark your hole with a jig and use a brad point bit for pencil point accuracy. 

Hi Dan, I have an old school (post #215227, reply #3 of 8)

Hi Dan, I have an old school dowel jig that works very well.  I have made hardwood versions when I needed a different size than my jig offered.  I would use a 2" long peice of 1"x2" oak or maple.  Then block it and clamp it so you can drill a nice clean 3/8" hole right down through it on a drill press.  Then super glue (2P-10) a fence on each of the 4 sides so you have your "hardwood sleeve" into which you can put your 1x2"s to be drilled.  I have found that a decent quality brand new bit will get you a lot of holes with this set-up before the jig starts to get over-bored and lose accuracy.  I think a factor that helps is drilling into the end grain with the jig, as opposed to across or through it.  

I have two of the old Stanley (post #215227, reply #4 of 8)

I have two of the old Stanley dowel guides.  I have used them with and without special blocks to drill various projects.  The most complicated was a form with angled and flared sides to insert long dowels.  This was the form for a dough weave bread basket my chef friend was making.


They make accurate repeatable setup jigs.

Go to the hardware store and (post #215227, reply #5 of 8)

Go to the hardware store and buy a couple of bronze bushings to use in your drill guide. These are much softer than a steel bushing so you'll probably have to use two or more as they wear out. They are inexpensive things. And, if you're lucky, the store will have steel bushings.

Removable Drill Bushings (post #215227, reply #6 of 8)

Look at the Removable Drill Bushings at https://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-drill-bushings/=18wym2c

usually for that size the OD is 3/4". . Look for your ID under the .375 section.
I usually buy them in pairs at the minimum since they can be reused indefintiely. Very handy to have. 

How? (post #215227, reply #7 of 8)

How in the hell did I log in as user-933288?  

Home Depot didn't have any (post #215227, reply #8 of 8)

Home Depot didn't have any sort drilling jig, but I found a dowling jig at Menards.  It's a bit awkward, but I bolted it to a wood jig and ended up with a pretty sweet rig.  Only real problem is that it's bolted together though a relatively flimsy plastic piece on the purchased jig, so I'm really wary of breaking it while moving it around.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville