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Lubricant for vinyl windows

JIMMIEM's picture

Need recommendations for lubricating double hung vinyl windows.  They don't slide up and down very easily.


 


 


 

(post #83662, reply #1 of 18)

Sprayon S00708 dry lube.

(post #83662, reply #2 of 18)

armoural

Slipit

boeshield B9

 

 


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(post #83662, reply #4 of 18)

Is the first one the automotive product?   Where can I get the other ones?


 


 

(post #83662, reply #8 of 18)

Yea the first

The others are at woodworking catalouges and stores.

Add spray silicone to the list

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #83662, reply #3 of 18)

Pam cooking spray.


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(post #83662, reply #5 of 18)

You're kidding, right?


 


 

(post #83662, reply #7 of 18)

Not at all. I have vinyl windows and when I moved in, they were all grungy. A quick squirt did  the job. Works on hinges too.

Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations


 

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #83662, reply #14 of 18)

I'm with Piffin; Silicone spray is the way to go. Anything with even a residual amount of oil is bound to gather dust over time and will start to bind and abrade. A clear, oil free lube is best.

Paste wax or paraffin also comes to mind, but they aren't always clear.

Scott.

Always remember those first immortal words that Adam said to Eve, “You’d better stand back, I don’t know how big this thing’s going to get.”

(post #83662, reply #6 of 18)

1) Don't use oil or WD40 -- ever!

2) Either a silicone lube or a teflon lube (TriFlow).

3) Spray, stick, or gel, whichever it available and easiest to apply in your situation. The gel may collect dirt a bit more than the other options. Spray can be hard to control, and may stain adjacent surfaces.

4) The old standby -- candle wax -- will work sorta OK. Bar soap will work too, but rubs/washes off very quickly.


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(post #83662, reply #9 of 18)

We have some questionable quality (not saying yours are) windows that wife bought just before we were married (I wouldn't have bought them) that stick when the weather strip starts to slide out of the slot. Can usually shove the strip back in the slot if you take the window out of the frame. Other than that, I've never had trouble with a vinyl window  (even these!) sticking.


(Factory (made locally) has been very good though and have replaced stuff for free (re-worked screens that had the little release buttons break off) and they have even replaced weather stripping that couldn't be slid back. They also said they'd come and drill the missing weep holes (but I did it). They said the installer was working with his own crew "off the clock/books" and they had no record of his having installed our windows, but they still agreed to fix every problem we've had! So, sometimes the dear wife does okay, even though it's not my way of doing things!

(post #83662, reply #10 of 18)

The windows are in my mother-in-law's  house. She's 86 and maybe a little weak so she thinks they're sticking.  I'll check the windows and lube them.  I keep telling my wife to get her mother on a strength (weight lifting) program.


  

(post #83662, reply #11 of 18)

You might put a dab of silicone caulk on the weatherstripping to lock them in. Don't over do it.

(post #83662, reply #12 of 18)

I'll try it--it's a pain to have to keep sliding them back up into their slots.


 

(post #83662, reply #13 of 18)

Elmer's SlideAll aerosol spray.  Any decent hardware store should have it.

(post #83662, reply #15 of 18)

You can't go wrong with ArmorAll (or similar).  It's meant for vinyl and won't cause any damage.  And it's plenty slick... just ask anybody who thought it was a good idea to use it on a motorcycle seat.


The only downside is that it doesn't last indefinitely, maybe a few months.  But I still think that's better than risking using a product that may ultimately make the windows worse.

(post #83662, reply #16 of 18)

As Sledgehammer said in the second post, I use Sprayon S00708 Dry Lube as well. It is the only spray lubricant sold by Andersen for the purpose of using on their vinyl jamb liners for easier operation.

I buy it by the case from Grainger, or you can get it from Andersen.

.

(post #83662, reply #17 of 18)

Things like ArmorAll have plasticizers in them and could cause the seal to stick eventually.


Too much sanity may be madness. And maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be! --Miguel de Cervantes


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(post #83662, reply #18 of 18)

pledge or any furniture polish. When I was doing warranty work on windows we used it alot. It might not last forever but it's cheap & most people already have it


 


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"this dog may be old but he ain't cold. And he still knows how to bury a bone."

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