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multimeter reading interpretation

k1c's picture

Hi.  I just tested the ice maker solenoids.  The meter is Ideal autoranging digital.  One solenoid that has 35v stamped on top (and supplies water to icemaker and assumed defective) reads 193.0 ohm.  Other solenoid has 15v stamped on top and reads .394k ohm.  Would you explain what these numbers mean, although I may have to know their normal resistance, which I don't have as yet.

Also why is one a whole number and the other in decimals with k after it?  K means 1000, right?  So why is the number in decimals?  Sorry but that is all the background information I have now.

The meter range/resolution for resistance is 400.0/4.000k/40.00k/400.0k ohm.

The solenoid assembly was completely disconnected from water lines and power supply.

Thank you in advance.

.394K is of course 394 ohms.  (post #192191, reply #1 of 13)

.394K is of course 394 ohms.  The reason the two readings are so different in appearance is simply that one's on the ohms range and one on the K ohms range.  If this is an auto-ranging meter, it switched to K ohms automatically since 394 is so close to the 400 ohm upper limit on the lowest range.

The numbers are reasonable for those solenoids -- I wouldn't regard either as being suspicious.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

multimeter (post #192191, reply #2 of 13)

Thank you for the reply.  That makes it clear.  Now I know the likely problem is the ice maker module.  Again, thanks.

Do spend a little time (post #192191, reply #3 of 13)

Do spend a little time checking for a broken wire or loose connection.  Especially any wires that are subject to movement or vibration.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Will do.  Thank you. (post #192191, reply #4 of 13)

Will do.  Thank you.

resistance reading (post #192191, reply #5 of 13)

Sorry but this just popped into my head.  Can the resistance reading of 193 ohm mean that the solenoid wire is loosing resistance and at the end of its life?  Just a speculation based on comparing two solenoid ohm numbers.  Again thank you for your help.

No, as the wire nears the end (post #192191, reply #6 of 13)

No, as the wire nears the end of its life (which is generally very long) the resistance will go up.  The coils have different resistance because of their power needs.  The more powerful the coil needs to be, the lower its resistance for a given voltage (or the higher the voltage for a given resistance).  Power is voltage squared times resistance.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

solenoids (post #192191, reply #7 of 13)

Thank you very much for all the help.  I will give the valve one more test to make sure it's not stuck closed.  Can't do any more tests.  I've run out of time according to my kids.  Again thank you.

Are you sure the ice maker is (post #192191, reply #8 of 13)

Are you sure the ice maker is cycling?

Try it by pouring some water in the tray from a container and see if it dumps ice.

Greg

ice maker (post #192191, reply #9 of 13)

Thank you for reply.  Exactly that was the second thing I tried per repairclinic suggestions.  The problem was in the icemaker.  Instead of trying to test the parts in the icemaker, I just ordered a replacement icemaker.  Again thank you.

Check voltage (post #192191, reply #10 of 13)

It would be useful to check voltage on both solenoids. If connection broken there is no voltage.

But when checking the voltage be careful not to touch power suply connections.

 

 

http://www.house-building-in-russia.com/

Sorry for late reply.  That (post #192191, reply #11 of 13)

Sorry for late reply.  That was third in the diagnostics suggested by the parts supplier.  But the broken connections were supposed to be rare.  Checking to see if the icemaker itself was cycling was second and it turned out the icemaker was bad.  Mine had motor and 3 switches and some other parts.  If I understood the diagnostics, the motor itself is also a timer and the price of motor and icemaker wasn't that different.  Thanks.

Multimeter (post #192191, reply #13 of 13)

I just bought a new multimeter from Fluke. It's Fluke 115. I don't have much experience with multimeter and still trying to figure out how it works. Reading here and their multimeter related old article. What does mean True multimeter? Update: I have found answer here https://bestmultimeterreviews.org

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https://www.fluke.com/en-us/l (post #192191, reply #12 of 13)