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Need advice on amount of jack studs needed

Jas135's picture

We are putting in a passthrough on a weight bearing wall in a one story home with basement. The opening is 5'.6" wide and the headers are two 2x8's. There are two sets of jack studs and two king studs. Would like to make the opening a little wider and wondered if we can eliminate one set of jack studs on each side for the opening size. From what I've read thus far one set of jack studs and one king on each side should be enough but need as many opinions as possible as it's my wife that needs convincing  We just had a builder here that didn't put any jack studs in it all at the beginning and we were fortunate that my wife was taking pictures of them building it and when she showed me I knew there was no support.Anyway,  I feel I overbuilt it but she still wants the extra jack studs....Really need those opinions/discussions so we can move forward in the building process.

 

What's overhead?  Is this a (post #214622, reply #1 of 19)

What's overhead?  Is this a load-bearing wall, and, if so, what sort of load?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

It's a load bearing wall with (post #214622, reply #2 of 19)

It's a load bearing wall with a roof overhead ....is this what you are asking?

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So there is a gable end above (post #214622, reply #3 of 19)

So there is a gable end above the wall?  No occupied floor?

What about snow load?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Pass through not on gable end (post #214622, reply #8 of 19)

Thank you for the data and specs. The passthrough will be built between the old part of the brick house and the new addition with siding(included picture in this post). It won't be on the end of gable. We live in high altitude area in WV and see our fare share of snow and the ground snow load is 30. There is no occupied floor above. Was hopping to take out one inner jack stud on both sides which would leave just one jack stud on both sides and two king studs. We have the majority of the studs in the original picture covered in drywall but the original posting pic shows them well. 

West Virginia

Use IBC 2003—20 psf-30 psf with Case Study Areas at higher elevations —And—

Contact Local Building Officials for determining required snow loads

There the the span tables for (post #214622, reply #4 of 19)

Here are the span tables for headers:

https://archive.org/stream/gov.law.icc.i...

EDIT:

Number of jack studs required is also listed in the tables.

span tables (post #214622, reply #9 of 19)

thank you for the span tables

Here is a simple solution that adds 3" of space (post #214622, reply #5 of 19)

As a general rule-of-the-thumb a single shoulder stud is fine. This gives you 1.5" of bearing on each end of the header. A second shoulder stud on each end gives you three inches of bearing, which is preferred for large clear -spans such as a garage door.  

My suggestion is very simple, and meets your wife's need: Put in a new header that is 3" larger than the existing one. Here's how it works:

Add two king studs; one on each side of the existing king studs. Screw temporary support 2x4's to the other side of the wall's top and tie plates. These studs will help to temporarily bear the load whle you work. Remove the header. Remove the two innermost jack studs; one from each side. Now you have increased your opening width by 3". Now cut the inner two king existing king studs (one on each side) so they become jack studs; points of bearing for your new header. In this manner you have achieved 3" of jack bearing on each end of the header. You have added 3" to the rough opening. You have added two king studs. You have not compromized the integrity of the design.  Good luck...and...um...pass me a Bier! :)

Mel Fros froscarpentry.com

Jas, (post #214622, reply #6 of 19)

Two jacks are perfectly fine. If you want to compromise replace the extra jacks with 1x4s or use some Simpson header hangers. KK

Is that real brick back (post #214622, reply #7 of 19)

Is that real brick back there?  Assuming that used to be an exterior wall and you've since added on to make it interior, are we looking from the "outside in" or the "inside out"?

I'm guessing "outside in", since the brick joints are cleanly struck, so the stud wall we're looking at is only "load bearing" to the extent that it carries some sort of roof load that is not born by the original structure.  This would be pretty much nothing at all, in most situations.

I suspect the framing you have is way overbuilt.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Yes it's real brick and exterior wall (post #214622, reply #10 of 19)

You were correct in guessing you are outside looking in. New additions were built on both ends of the old house. I've included a pic of the old house in this post. Lots of pictures if you check out each post. What happened was is that we had a carpenter come in to install a pass through, my wife took pictures of the building process and when she showed me that days work in the photo (included) I noticed there were no jack studs under the header and it was merely framed in. We had to tear out the drywall and install a set of jack studs under the header but they at least had the king studs installed. My wife insisted on an additional king stud at each end and an additional set of jack studs. I too feel it's over built and want to reclaim a little space and wonder if just one jack stud under each end of header and the 2 king studs at both ends will suffice. 

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Without knowing the details (post #214622, reply #11 of 19)

Without knowing the details of how the roof works overhead it's hard to say for sure, but I suspect it was fine the way it was originally built.  I don't think it's a load-bearing wall, and the header isn't really required.

But note that if you are intending to widen the brick opening you may need to install some sort of new header in the brickwork.  And the framing on the other side of the wall may be load-bearing and require careful consideration if you widen the opening.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

found a pic with the rafters (post #214622, reply #12 of 19)

Thank you for the energy that you have put into this post. I came across this pic and think it might be helpful. Ive circled the area that we are working on. we wont be widening the brick portion.

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OK, it's carrying a roof (post #214622, reply #14 of 19)

OK, it's carrying a roof load, but nothing extreme.  The opening on the far left is about as wide, and you need not do any more than you have there.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

so, obviously it's weight (post #214622, reply #13 of 19)

so, obviously it's weight bearing and you need the header (the trusses are loaded onto the top plate above, so the studs you removed were carrying load). If you look to the right, the other, larger opening is framed with one jack stud on either side.

Hi there, The rule of thumb (post #214622, reply #15 of 19)

Hi there, The rule of thumb (which is very conservative) says a header 6' or less in length needs one jack per side, over 6' needs 2 jacks per side, over 12' needs 3 per side.  You need one per side in your situation.  Again, if you want some extra peice of mind add a Simpson header hanger and you have your belts and suspenders..

We measured the board at being 8" wide (post #214622, reply #16 of 19)

Since the board is 8" wide but only 5'.6" (under 6 feet) would we need 2 jack studs on each side or just one on each under the header? 

If it makes you nervous just (post #214622, reply #17 of 19)

If it makes you nervous just screw through the king studs and into the header with some 8" Timberlok screws. I'd use 4 on each end and never think about it again.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 45 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

One on each side is all you (post #214622, reply #18 of 19)

One on each side is all you need.  

One on each side is all you (post #214622, reply #19 of 19)

One on each side is all you need.