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Is this ok? Water intrusion between footing and foundation

NWCarpenter's picture

This is by a private home inspector. The crawl has a drain to daylight from the lowest point and gravel on top of the grade.

Do you see any reason for concern?

Thank you!

 

NW (post #215855, reply #1 of 4)

NWCarpenter wrote:

This is by a private home inspector. The crawl has a drain to daylight from the lowest point and gravel on top of the grade.

Do you see any reason for concern?

Thank you!

 

 

Yes, to the question of concern.

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It means that the house needs (post #215855, reply #2 of 4)

It means that the house needs downspout extensions.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Maybe but (post #215855, reply #3 of 4)

the house was designed and approved for downspouts to splashblocks and is built that way. 

Did I say it wasn't? You (post #215855, reply #4 of 4)

Did I say it wasn't?

You have fairly minor water intrusion.  You need to make sure that rainwater doesn't stand near the foundation.  Mostly this is a matter of properly grading around the house, and using other measures (the extensions) to assure that water doesn't stand nearby.

What usually happens with a new structure is that the foundation is built and the soil is backfilled around it.  Things look good.  But a few years later the backfill has settled down, and low spots develop.

One way or another -- adding soil, mud-jacking slabs, adding downspout extensions or underground drains for the downspouts -- you need to assure that water never "stands" within about 10 feet of the foundation.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville