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Outside Corner Cedar

Design2Reno's picture

Outside Corner Cedar (post #215178)

Hello there,

I've been asked to change the the exterior stain.  The corners in the pictures are approx 7 years of age and the corners are starting to open up.  Are there any solutions for fixing besides replacing all the siding?  Epoxy fillers, external wood glue with sawdust, etc...

Thanks, Dennis

 

Can't see your pictures, but (post #215178, reply #1 of 9)

Can't see your pictures, but if you can find them "tin corners" are an old-timey solution.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

OK, tin corners won't work (post #215178, reply #2 of 9)

OK, tin corners won't work very well on that style.  The common solution is to overlay the corners with two pieces of 1x fastened together in an L shape.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Dan is right, the common (post #215178, reply #3 of 9)

Dan is right, the common solution is to overlay with 1 X 4's. Like many common solutions it's a terrible idea that will lead to even worse rot.

A proper fix would be to cut the corners back and make a new corner from 1 x 4 PVC trim boards.  Cut the front side back 2 3/4" and the other side back 3 1/2'  so the 1 x 4 s will overlap. Prime the cut ends of the cedar, twice preferably then use a poilyurethane caulk to seal them to the wall. Add your 1 x 4"'s properly caulked and you'll have a corner that will last longer than the cedar.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 45 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

Preformed PVC outside corners (post #215178, reply #6 of 9)

Preformed PVC outside corners are even better- there is no joint or ripping of pieces.

Let's Just Say (post #215178, reply #4 of 9)

I totally agree with the comments posted, BUT the owner isn't in favor the overlapped corners as the home has a modern design.  I was thinking I could use a two part epoxy, fill a syringe and fill the cracks?

Thoughts or solutions? Thanks.

That will last at least until (post #215178, reply #5 of 9)

That will last at least until your check clears. On the bright side it's steady work if you do their way.

You can use a razor knife to slice the tongue off the bad boards, cut them down the middle, pull them out and install new ones, properly backprimed.  That would be a  quality repair  that will last and look good. 

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 45 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

Advice Please (post #215178, reply #7 of 9)

I guess I have three options:

  1. My way (which your not fond of :-)
  2. Taking out some of the boards your way and trying to place some new ones in their place.
  3. Placing a corner piece over top (like two 1x3's configured as a lap joint)

If you were do to an outside mitred corner what would be your method of construction?  (i.e. wood glue, brad vs pin nailer, etc..)  

I'm in Vancouver Canada and there are A LOT of new homes built with this type of construction as it is suppose to look all modern like.  I'm not sure how they are going to stand up in the ling run though.

Thanks,

I've done your way many times (post #215178, reply #8 of 9)

I've done your way many times and had pretty much total failure. Not right away but over the ensuing months so that it looked terrible. 

Taking out boards and replacing them would really be my first choice and is neither hard to do and doesn't take that long. When you install the new boards cut off the inside of the groove so the board can be pushed up from the bottom and nailed in place. I'd use Gorilla glue on the miters. Also make sure you've primed every spot of raw wood before you install the boards.

I didn't recommend corner boards over the top. That's a hack repair. My suggestion is to cut the cedar back and install vertical PVC so the cedar butts into it. 5/4 would look even better.

Whatever repair you make eventually you'll probably end up doing all the corners and maybe the windows. Down here in south Florida we call cedar " job security." as it needs constant repair and replacement.  We installed millions of BF of it in the 70's and early 80's and it's provided constant work ever since. Most of it is gone now and you'd be hard pressed to buy a piece of cedar except by special order at a lumber company.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 45 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

What is behind this cladding? (post #215178, reply #9 of 9)

What is behind this cladding? Specifically, is it part of a rainscreen system? If so, and there are many of these in BC, then the gaps at the corners are irrelevant to the longevity of the structure. My own house has such detailing with purposful gaps between horizontal cladding boards (cedar) and gaps in the corners. 

If you don't know what a rainscreen is, then you need to find out. If this house doesn't have a rainscreen, then what is your proposal for dealing with the apparant horizontal gaps between the cladding boards? 

Notice that I keep calling it cladding. To me, there is a difference between the terms: cladding and siding. Siding is used to keep out the elements, cladding is merely there for aesthetics and to protect the underlying wrb.