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Piers at corners of 10'x15' shed

damunk's picture

Double 2 x10PT frame.  Where should corner of frame land on pier?  It's a simple gabled shed. 8' walls w/ 9/12 roof.  Corner posts centered on pier or corner to outside edge of pier?  Or maybe it's fine either way.

It depends on whether you (post #207499, reply #1 of 10)

It depends on whether you want to trip over the pier while you're inside the shed or outside.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Huh???  Shed sits on top of (post #207499, reply #2 of 10)

Huh???  Shed sits on top of piers. Ur corn-fused

(There's a slight advantage (post #207499, reply #3 of 10)

(There's a slight advantage to having as much of the pier under the shed as possible, since that reduces the surface that can collect and hold rain/snow and promote rot in the framing.)


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

The rim joist should land on (post #207499, reply #4 of 10)

The rim joist should land on the outside edge of the piers. If it were my shed I'd want some intermediate piers in there as well.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

I was just thinking that (post #207499, reply #5 of 10)

I was just thinking that perhaps load would be transfered "better" if corner posts were centered on pier, rather than outside edge. You are not comfortable with double 2 x 10 spanning 15'? No live load, really...

Not comfortable is a good way (post #207499, reply #7 of 10)

Not comfortable is a good way of putting it. The Span tables may say it's okay but that's a long way to support any kind of load.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

there are some details missing but, (post #207499, reply #6 of 10)

If it will store much weight at all I would want at least a center pier as well.

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center pier as well,  and (post #207499, reply #8 of 10)

center pier as well,  and other sturctural concerns ,

HUH, This is a 10 foot wide SHED!!

 It 'ah piers' folks dont really read the OP?

I have sheds that have been standing for 35 years (including thru a 7.2 earthquake) that only have 4x4s sitting right on the ground.  No concrete or footing even, perfectly good for keeping the rain off stuff. 

PS: also have a 14 x14 'shed' that has over 10 yards of concrete - has my 5HP 3 phase 2-1/2 ton knee mill in it -- most of the concrete as a stability base for the mill.  Do not really think the OP is building that type 'shed' ?

 Closest to what the OP talks about is a 9 ft by 14 ft shed (from the days of 120 sq ft max without a permit days), That does have 6 chunks of old sidewalk laid on the ground spanned by half-rotted old RR ties and 4-1/2 ft pallets laid over those for the floor, has held up right nice for decades also.   

 

Maybe he should use ONLY a (post #207499, reply #10 of 10)

Maybe he should use ONLY a center pier, and cantilever the thing.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

double 2x8PT perimeter (post #207499, reply #9 of 10)

double 2x8PT perimeter framing seems fine for this shed.  It's just for garden junk.  There may be a few 100# bags of lawn care stuff but.....have 2x6 joists......The concrete piers are for leveling more than anything else 'cause grade falls away quite quick from "front".  I was mainly wondering about how corners should land on the piers.  And you're correct, this is the max. our town allows w/o permit.  10x16 requires one.