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SAE 30 - oil for small engine

plantlust's picture

So I got a new/used tool on Saturday (8HP chipper/shredder, still not big enough but YIPPEE anyway<G>) and I noticed that I'm supposed to check the oil after every 5 hours of use and add only SAE 30 oil.

Well, I stopped in a gas station yesterday and there is SAE 5-30 and a couple of other types. The bottle didn't give any real info.

So which SAE 30 oil should I use?

Oh the details, MTD 8HP chipper/shredder. Can handle up to 3inch diameter branches and bought it thru Craig's list.


Kitty has progressed from Hunter to Serial Killer.

Thanksgiving - a holiday for side dishes.

(post #86829, reply #1 of 22)

who made the motor???

 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!



Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!


 



"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #86829, reply #18 of 22)

If I remember correctly, it's a Tec something.  American Indian.  Darnit, there was a "U" in the word too...


Kitty has progressed from Hunter to Serial Killer.

Thanksgiving - a holiday for side dishes.

(post #86829, reply #19 of 22)

Glasses, check.
Leather gloves, check...(found THAT out the hard way)
First time I got it started the dogs took off into the house, so Animal safety, check!


I have to remember not to get all enthusiastic and exceed the design limitations on this one either...



Kitty has progressed from Hunter to Serial Killer.

Thanksgiving - a holiday for side dishes.

(post #86829, reply #20 of 22)

that would be a Tecumseh...


http://www.tecumsehpower.com/CustomerService/BSI.pdf


 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!



Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!


 



"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"
"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #86829, reply #21 of 22)

I'm pretty good with engines, but those that design them know a whole lot more about them than I do. If they say to use 30W, that's what I use, and that's what I'd recommend others to use.

My current choice of 30W oil, though, is Shell Rotella, which is for diesel engines. Gas-engine motor oils have had zinc and phosphorus removed from them in recent years; these were very good lubricants for surfaces such as camshaft lobes and lifters. Diesel oils still have these compounds. Most auto parts stores, such as Pep Boys, carry this oil.


Edited 6/13/2009 9:34 am ET by OverKnight

All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. - Edmund Burke

(post #86829, reply #22 of 22)

If it's a Tecumseh, use whatever oil you like; they won't honour their 'guarantee' anyway. Buncha crooks....


 


 


Okay, that's just my angry oozing out; chintzy bastards refused a legit warranty claim for a snowblower engine they manufactured which allowed rain water to enter the crankcase. 


Use SAE 30 summer, SAE 5 or 10 in cool (under 32F) weather.


The reason for the thinner oil in cold weather is twofold: (1) it'll be easier to start, and (2) the thinner oil will splash up onto the cylinder walls better on start-up at cold temps than thicker stuff, helping prevent scoring.



Dinosaur


How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....


Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #86829, reply #2 of 22)

Both will work just fine. The main thing to do is maintain the oil level and change it now and again as the mood strikes you. Keep the air filter somewhat clean and if you want it to start every time, drain the carburetor every time you use it before storing it away. If you don't have a fuel shut off valve, drain the tank each time and then restart the motor and let it run at half speed till it quits from gas starvation. Don't store gas for long periods of time and get fresh fuel each season.

I've got a chipper/shredder too. Makes fantastic compost. I don't use the chipper portion often but the flail shredder is a real winner. Keep your clothes tight, hold the material loosely when feeding and don't wear a watch or ring while feeding the small stuff,,,man does that thing suck the small branches in fast once they're caught by the mechanism! Getting your arm caught would be ugly. Be careful!

(post #86829, reply #4 of 22)

Good points, woodway.  I have a 8Hp top load shredder with a side chipper.


Let me add:  Wear eye protection, as it can kick out some odd size pieces and use ear protection, too.  Do what the directions say as far as the material's diameter on the shredder side.  They say it should not be exceeded.  Usually, it's limbs that are 1/2" in diameter or less. Use the material stuffer/rammer to push the limbs down, not your hand.  Sometimes I'll keep out a 3' long limb that nice and straight to poke the stubborn stuff into the shredder when the factory rammer won't push it far enough.  I try to make this long limb a soft green one in case it goes into the flailers.  You'll know when you find the right one.


Know that when the shredder side with the flaillers grab the stuff, it rips it out of you hand, so use tight leather gloves and a somewhat loose grip, especially when shredding limbs that have dried and become hard. 


Sometimes, it's good to recycle the chipped/shredded stuff through the shredder again, so spreading out a 10'x10" tarp on the ground the first time as you go will not only help you run it through a second time, but also will allow you to pull all the shredded material to your garden or dump site. 


Plus, QVC sells a green metal rake that is round and has a pull handle on the long metal handle that closes the long rake tines around large amounts of dried leaves and twigs.  You open it up and let the stuff drop into the shredder.  Not much as a rake, though it will rake things into a pile, but sure is good for grabbing, lifting and dumping into the shredder or open garbage bag.  It sells for about $25.


Remember to keep the kids away, too.


Bill

(post #86829, reply #5 of 22)

I tried the rake feed too and opted for a hay fork (pitch fork) to drop small loads into the top of the shredder. A lot faster and it allows me to stand back a ways too. I know what you mean about catching hold ...man does that ever get sucked in fast! I use a three foot long old branch about 1 1/2 inches in diameter to stuff the material down into the hopper with ... you've got to watch just where you push otherwise it gets caught and in it goes. I had one for about three months till I messed up and it got caught at the last minute...now I need a new push stick.

(post #86829, reply #3 of 22)

go to wally world....


if you have a Briggs in that chipper pick a straight 30 wieght oil from well known brand of USA manufacture...


Valvoline, Kendall, Quaker... etc...


you do need to know if yur engine specs non-detergent or regular oil....


easiest to find non-detergent oil (if that is what you nee) at an auto parts strore... 


stay as a far away from J&K Chemical as you can....


found this...


http://www.briggsandstratton.com/maint_repair/routine_maintenance/BS_routine-maintenance_schedule.pdf


 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!



Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!


 



"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"
"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #86829, reply #6 of 22)

SAE 30 simply means straight 30 weight oil.

5-30, etc... is not straight 30 weight.

Just look for SAE 30 on the bottle. That's all. Nothing else.

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Something is only impossible... Until it isn't..

.You are always welcome at Quittintime

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It's a small world. Until you have to walk home...

(post #86829, reply #7 of 22)

5-30w is not the same oil as 30w.


Most, not all, air cooled engines specify a straight viscosity oil like 20w, 30w or 40w, depending on ambient operating temperature. Cooler the ambient temperature the lower the viscosity (weight), higher temps - higher viscosity.


Detergency is another specification for the oil, for example, Quaker State HD 30w is a 30w, high detergency oil.  Again, most, not all, air cooled engines specify a detergent oil.  Detergency is a measure of how much crud the oil will hold in suspension, since most air cooled engines do not have an oil filter, they spec a detergent oil so the crud drains out with the oil.


If you cannot locate an engine manual from either the shedder manufacturer of the engine manufacturer: Given the 30w oil only tag, I would use a high detergent 30w.


Suggest an auto supply store, farm / tractor supply store or any truck stop as a supplier.


Does not surprise me that you could not locate a 30w oil at the gas station since the vast majority of cars / light trucks have been using multi-viscosity oils since the '70's at least. 10-30w, 5-30w, 15-40w, etc.


Jim


Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.
Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

(post #86829, reply #9 of 22)

That's good information on oil, but I've got to wonder if it really matters.


Although I use the correct oil in my vehicles and change the oil and filter every 5,000 miles, I am very careless about which oil I use in my small engines.  My riding mower burns oil so I add as needed without ever changing, but my regular mower has never had an oil change since I bought it 10 years ago and it still runs fine.  I think I topped it off a few years ago.  I'm not recommending that anyone else run these long-term oil tests, maybe I've just been lucky.


There's an ad by some oil company to the effect that, if you use their oil and maintain it properly, they will guarantee that you will never have an oil-related engine failure.  When I heard the ad, I couldn't help but think that I have NEVER, EVER heard of oil-related engine failure... that is, other than actually running out of oil.


In fact, I know someone who seized their engine because they ran it without oil.  It was taken to an auto repair shop where they somehow managed to free it (without disassembling anything), put oil in it and got it running again.  It does burn a little oil now, but otherwise it's running fine.

(post #86829, reply #12 of 22)

>>My riding mower burns oil so I add as needed without ever changing,<<


I think you are now pumping a fine slurry of bearing, cylinder wall and piston ring filings through the engine - which will shorten the engine's life.  Is the amount of oil consumed gradually rising? Oil pretty black and smell kind of burnt? Might want to watch that consumption rate.


>> but my regular mower has never had an oil change since I bought it 10 years ago and it still runs fine.<<


Let me guess, the main body of your yard is cut with the riding mower and the regular mower is only used to trim a few select areas around trees or planting beds perhaps?  If this is the case, in 10 years, your regular mower probably has less than 20 operating hours on the engine, maybe less. It is probably due for an oil change, most mower manufacturer's recommend an oil change interval of 10-20 hours.


>>.. maybe I've just been lucky.<<  so far, so good.


For many people the preventative maintenance on small engines is a very casual thing primarily because the small engine tools are relatively cheap to replace.


I am cheap! I can buy a whole lot of clean oil for the price of a new mower or snowblower. Oil change once a year in the fall for mower, spring for snow blower, handle it the same time I drain the gas from the tanks and run the engine until the fuel system is empty.


Jim 


 


Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.


Edited 6/10/2009 9:07 am ET by JTC1

Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

(post #86829, reply #14 of 22)

JTC1

My Honda mower shows 5-30 is OK.

I use synthetic in all my motors.

Pete

(post #86829, reply #15 of 22)

I am in Florida where it seldom ever gets cold so I use 30HD in everything. Sam's usually has it by the case or I get it from an auto parts store

Greg

(post #86829, reply #16 of 22)

>>My Honda mower shows 5-30 is OK.<<


I am not saying you are making a mistake there.......but (there's always a but right?)


Your post got me curious as I also have a Honda mower - great mower!  The use of 5w-30 in the mower would simplify my oil "inventory" as I have a car, truck and snowblower - all of which recommend 5w-30.


I do not know what model / year oh Honda you have.  I did a little research and found the answer for my Honda mower - 2007 or 2008, Honda HRX217 mower - all from page 11 of my owner's manual:


Ambient temperature / oil viscosity recommendation chart shows:


5w-30 for 30*F. and below.


10w-30 for 0*F. to 100*F.+


30w for 50*F. to 100*F.+


"SAE 10w-30 is recommended for general use. Other viscosities shown in the chart may be used when the average temperature in your area is within the recommended range."   [I selected 30w since I always fall within the 50 - 100 F. range.]


.......


"Use 4-stroke automotive detergent oil."


.......


"Honda recommends API SERVICE category SJ or later oil with the ILSAC "starburst" certification mark displayed on the container."


.......


"NOTICE: Using non-detergent oil can shorten the engine's service life, and using 2-stroke oil can damage the engine." [Honda's italics]


I use 30w in my mower since I can't ever remember cutting the grass at below 50*F., but, unfortunately, do remember cutting at temps approaching 100! I suspect you are cutting in about the same temperatures in TX.


I suspect the 10w-30 recommendation appears to provide easier starting - though mine has always started on first pull with 30w. Or perhaps it is an "inventory" consideration for the owners.


I also discovered that the recommended change interval is longer than I thought - every 50 hours (I thought it was 25), or yearly, when the mower is prepared for winter storage - so the reality is - nothing changed for me.


>>I use synthetic in all my motors.<<


Probably good thinking!


Jim


Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.


Edited 6/10/2009 3:58 pm ET by JTC1

Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

(post #86829, reply #8 of 22)

A multi grade oil will work in air cooled engines but will be consumed faster. Like the others have said , many manufacturers reccomend single viscosity for this reason.


Rich

(post #86829, reply #11 of 22)

The only air cooled engine which I have seen which recommend multi-weight oil is on my snowblower - 5-30w.


I think they are pretty sure about the maximum ambient operating temperature  for these.


Multi-vis when straight vis is recommended?  There is the old (and true) mechanic's saying:


"Any oil is better than no oil."


Jim


 


Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.
Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

(post #86829, reply #10 of 22)

I would not use a multigrade oil above 40º, stick with straight 30W that is made for
4 cycle air cooled engines, and change to the 5W-30 in the fall

you can get yellow 48oz. bottles of Briggs & Stratton oil at Wally world for around $4, it's over by the lawn mowers and patio furniture on a shelf along the wall.... or go to Farm and Fleet in Montgomery where it's by the Ag stuff and replacement small engines.

goto Sears at FV

or find a outdoor equipment dealer like ...... Russo on N Aurora Rd in Naperville between Ogden and 59, ........ this would be my first choice, as they could provide knowledge, service and parts for you, if they're still in business !!!! and while you're there ask them about SeaFoam for your engine very good stuff IMO

There has to be a lot of small engine repair shops out that way too

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(post #86829, reply #13 of 22)

You need to go either to a hardware store or an auto center and ask for 30 weight non detergent

(post #86829, reply #17 of 22)

You can get Castrol SAE 30 oil at Wal Mart. I have been getting it there for years.