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Streaks from paint brush

bluewhale's picture

Hey question how do i not get paint streaks when painting doors and trim.  I seem to get thin lines from the brush. 

(post #75331, reply #1 of 21)

Better brushes, better paint, better conditions, better techique...buy a sprayer.


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


I have irriatable Vowel syndrome.

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #75331, reply #2 of 21)

I am going to use Ben moore paint before i used Behr paint so when i start i dont want to see the brush streaks can you be a little more specific about which paint brushes are better?  Would i use a foam brush instead?

(post #75331, reply #3 of 21)

I hate painting and as such do very little, but Purdy makes a damm fine brush. I spray whenever possible and back brush to just tip off the final look.


I'd say I spray 10 time more paint/varnish/shellack/lacquer than I ever brush.



Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


I have irriatable Vowel syndrome.

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #75331, reply #11 of 21)

Purdies, SW Contractor's line, etc.  I get good results on flat surfaces with the mohair & foam flat pads in various sizes.


With latex paint, stir in a shot of Flotrol (found near the spray equipment at HD); with alklyd, use Penetrol. These additives improve the handling without diluting the color.

(post #75331, reply #4 of 21)

Paint when/where it's warm, and keep the paint warm before opening the can. If you're working in the garage where it's 40 degrees, the paint will not flow out as well.


You can experiment with thinning the paint very slightly. I have been doing some door with Moore semi latex and the paint has been too thick, like spreading honey. A very small amount of water helps quite a bit.


You can also experiment with a flow additive like Floetrol. This retards the drying of the paint and allows it to flow out more. Be careful, once you add the stuff you need to use the paint up, so just add it to what you are using now.


Purdy brushes are good. There are quite a few types that all look about the same to the untrained eye. I have a nice new 2.5" that has a very thin tip and a thin handle. Good for finish work. They make others that are better for slopping it on. Ask at a good paint store and expect to pay $15-20.

(post #75331, reply #7 of 21)

Why do you need to use all the paint once Floetrol has been added?


I looked on the container and it does not mention this.


 

How do we dance while our world keeps turning? 

 

How do we sleep while our beds are burning?

 

 

"I wanna be a race car passenger.  You know, the guy that bugs the driver.  Say, man, can I stick my feet out the window?  Do we have to keep going in circles?  Mind if I turn on the radio?  Boy, you really like Tide."

(post #75331, reply #12 of 21)

I've never had a problem storing it...some for 4 years.

(post #75331, reply #5 of 21)

What everyone said above.

Also, work quickly. Get the paint on and then leave it alone.

Rich Beckman

This signature line intentionally left blank.

(post #75331, reply #20 of 21)

There's the key, Rich - well said.  I just replied so this appears more than once.


Apply, spread, tip, move on . . . .


Most people just keep futzing with the stuff for too long and don't let it flow out.  The "feel" of the brush should not be under-rated.


The trick is enough paint so it flows, not so much that it runs or sags.



http://jhausch.blogspot.com
Adventures in Home Building
An online journal covering the preparation and construction of our new home.

http://jhausch.blogspot.com 
Adventures in Home BuildingAn online journal covering the preparation and construction of our new home.

(post #75331, reply #6 of 21)

Spray.


I love brushed trim and doors.  It just looks so much better, like it was applied by hand, by an actual human being, and not finished by some machine in a factory.  Sprayed is nice, but it leaves me wanting.  The only doors that look better sprayed are simple flush doors IMO. 


Floetrol will help, paint will keep a wet edge longer, allowing you to cleanup sloppy brushstrokes, and the paint will level itself a bit.


 

How do we dance while our world keeps turning? 

 

How do we sleep while our beds are burning?

 

 

"I wanna be a race car passenger.  You know, the guy that bugs the driver.  Say, man, can I stick my feet out the window?  Do we have to keep going in circles?  Mind if I turn on the radio?  Boy, you really like Tide."

(post #75331, reply #8 of 21)

All really good advise. I might add that tempering the brush first by soaking it in water for waterborne finishes or thinners for oil base finishes,helps. After soaking shake the excess out so the brush is damp. If its important to you or a client not to have brush strokes, I say this because I live in an area where people expect to see product with slight imperfections as if it were done by hand and not a machine. Any way, lie the piece flat, if possible and after laying the paint down, smooth it once or twice in the same direction, then stop, don't over work it, let it rest, good paint will level out by itself. any attempt to work it after a certain point, will only pick up impressions.

(post #75331, reply #9 of 21)

buy a good brush, the more expensive the better. if using oil,soak the brush in paint thinner to condition the brush, water if oil base. give the brush a good spin, then paint away. you might do this a couple of times during the day, this will prevent the brush from becoming a club. and if using latex, get it on and then LEAVE IT ALONE. oil will take longer to set upset up  and I use oil 99% of the time latex, imo, is an inferior product.

(post #75331, reply #15 of 21)

I don't agree with the more expensive the better. I bought a 25.00 Prudy brush in a SW store and hate it. I like the 14.00 Purdy from HD that's made just for latex. I use the minimum amount of Floetrol that's recomended. The moulding comes out great. Just my .02

 


 


 


Headstrong, I'll take on anyone!

(post #75331, reply #16 of 21)

>>> I don't agree with the more expensive the better. I bought a 25.00 Prudy brush in a SW store and hate it.


Was it by any chance a natural bristle used on latex paint? Not ideal.


The one thing I didn't see in the responses is to make sure one uses natural ONLY on oil base, use synthetic (nylon or poly or hi-tech mix) on latex. Throw away foam brushes are good only if you don't care about the looks of your results (IMNSHO)


Also the comment from someone on Floetrol mix needing to be used promptly: as others have pointed out, not necessarily true. Not my experience anyway, can you please point to a reference or was just an opinion.

(post #75331, reply #17 of 21)

Re floetrol, just something I thought I remembered reading on the container, could be entirely wrong. Naturally if you are using the stuff you will read the instructions, so what I say won't matter much.

(post #75331, reply #18 of 21)

I use that same brush for oil, for a couple of reasons.


1. the bristles don't fall out


2. the finish can't be matched by the bristle brushes


3. clean up is a breeze with thinner


4. the brush holds its shape better


5. costs less then a bristle, and you can chuck it after a job!

(post #75331, reply #10 of 21)

I often use a small (3") roller--either regular nap, or the foam rollers with the rounded ends. Just use a good brush (Purdy) for stuff I can't get with the roller.  When painting doors that are hanging and not on saw horses, I use the brush at the edges near walls, hinges and floors and to touch up bottom corners of panels where excess paint gathers.

(post #75331, reply #13 of 21)

I use brushes only where I cannot use a roller. I brush rounded stuff like moldings and finish every where else with fine rollers. The rollers are 3 to 6 inches long with naps a fine as 1/16 of an inch.

Before I hang a door I will finish them in my shop, if not staining the door I will prime with an oil base. You can sand an oil based primer smooth as glass and the finish coats go on really well.

The same goes for trim, prefinish then install.

(post #75331, reply #14 of 21)

I recently did a trim job, and was amazingly impressed with the paint job that  the H.O. wife did. I asked if she had it sprayed, she said no, she used a good paint brush and Benjamin Moore Oil.


this was a retired couple, but she sure knew what she was doing.

                                                 

(post #75331, reply #19 of 21)

Pretty much everybody has assumed you are using a latex paint. Is that right?

Brushes do matter. I've noticed that Purdy (one of the best) is now selling some brushes in the home centers. But if you go to a real paint store, you will find the higher end of the Purdy line -- which is what you want. Wooster is another good brand.

********************************************************
"It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts."

John Wooden 1910-

******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-2010

(post #75331, reply #21 of 21)

As Nikkiwood said, the difference between a $14 Purdy and the top brush they make is significant in both usability and finish quality.


Flotrol is a must. 


 


Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.