Subscribe or Renew Membership Subscribe Renew

Truss to Girder Connection - Retrofit Support Strengthening?

NateHowie's picture

My home has long trusses with an offset vault that connects to a girder truss on one side.  The girder is a 3 ply 2x6 assembly.  It looks like the 3 ply girder was installed 1 ply at a time.  The trusses that connect are not supported/connected with hangers.  Instead there are 3 nailes nailed in through 1 of the 3 ply girders (the one closest to the trusses obviously) into each truss end.  Then the other 2 ply of the girder was nailed to the first.  I can tell by viewing the nailes through the small gaps that exist between the girder plys and feeling the nails with a shim. 

I have had some issues with settling and it appears that the trusses that connect to the girder sit about an 8th inch to 3/16ths maybe below the girder.  I can't tell if they dropped/settled or if that's the way they were installed. 

I am wondering if I should and how I could perhaps jack up the large trusses at the connection point such that the bottom of the trusses become flush with the bottom of the girder and then I would install proper girder-to-truss hangers for extra support.  Would that make sense?  How could that be done if so?

. (post #214578, reply #1 of 6)

It really pisses me off to see such stupidity in construction.  But I've seen that done before.

 

You're on the right track in what you're thinking.  But I'd wanna see the situation myself before I gave any specific advice.

Do you know where the trusses came from?  The manufacturer could advise you as to what hanger to use.

Thanks.  I don't know the (post #214578, reply #2 of 6)

Thanks.  I don't know the manufacturer, but could try and find out.  I had an engineer give me recommendations on hangers to use, however I don't know how to go about adding them "if" i wanted to attempt to lift up the trusses to make them flush with the girder.  If I put the hangers on as-is, I would just cut the drywall celiing and start adding them, but I would like to see if there is good way or ideas to lift them up to remove any stress from places that shouldn't have that stress and then put the hangers on.  If I put the hangers on now, the trusses would be lower than the girder (by about a 1/8 to 1/4 inch or so). 

Lifting it a little wouldn't (post #214578, reply #3 of 6)

Lifting it a little wouldn't hurt anything.  (If you can get solid support below)    But 1/8" to 1/4" isn't enough to make me lose any sleep.

Thats the way we used to (post #214578, reply #4 of 6)

Thats the way we used to build truss roofs. Now days you'd have to use buckets on the girder for the trusses to sit in.  Typically trusses aren't very accurate and typically the trusses won't line up perfectly with the girder. We almost always strapped our ceilings so it didn't matter.  In your case, since you're going to have to repair drywall either way, I'd do something different. I'd cut an 18" wide piece of 3/4 ply 4' long and screw a 4' piece of 4 X 4 in the middle. I'd put that on the drywall ceiling right where the trusses connect to the girder  but not under the girder and try jacking. If that works use some 8" or 10" Timberlok screws through the girder and into the ends of the trusses from the attic.  However, there is a danger that you may push  the top of the trusses up enough to spring the roof.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 45 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

What do you mean "spring the (post #214578, reply #5 of 6)

What do you mean "spring the roof"?  Thanks!

When you move the bottom up (post #214578, reply #6 of 6)

When you move the bottom up the top will want to go with it. If you're only moving 1/4" it may not matter.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 45 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.