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Wet Stamp?

florida's picture

Wet Stamp? (post #83843)

35 years I've been in construction and never heard the term "wet stamp" until I came here. I understand what it is but here in Florida we get engineers to "seal" plans which means they put there state embossing seal on the plans for the building dept. Why not just "stamp" the plans since all stamps are wet or at least damp.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

(post #83843, reply #1 of 12)

Not exactly sure because I've never heard the term. But I have my architects seal in my computer and print it out with the rest of the plan on the plotter. When he gets them he is required to initial them all. So it saves time stamping when he may have to do it thirty or forty times to go into permitting.

(post #83843, reply #2 of 12)

That's not legal everywhere.


Jeff

(post #83843, reply #3 of 12)

wet stamp is the ink stamp. there is also the press stamp that leaves marks in the peper. the press stamp will not show up on copies.

(post #83843, reply #4 of 12)

Believe me, I know exactly what is being referred to.


At lease some states require the original wet stamp - not a scanned reproduction.  


Jeff

(post #83843, reply #9 of 12)

I think it still requires a wet signature ... should be good to go then.

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #83843, reply #11 of 12)

Okay, I can see where my question wasn't clear. I understand what the term means I just wonder how the word "wet" got attached to "stamp." Wouldn't "stamp" be understood to be wet? Is there a type of stamp that isn't wet? When you talk to your engineer or building officials do they refer to it as a "wet stamp?"

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

(post #83843, reply #12 of 12)

Yes, we call it a wet stamp.  The idea is that it's wet ink freshly applied by hand (either with a rubber stamp or an ink pen), instead of a signature or stamp that's part of the drawing itself as it rolls out of the printer.

(post #83843, reply #5 of 12)

We have to submit one set to the city/county that has an original stamp.  the others can be part of the cad program, or copied on the plans when they are printed.  So one set that goes in for permit will usually have two stamps, the copied one that shows on all the sets, and an orriginal.


"Put your creed in your deed."   Emerson


"When asked if you can do something, tell'em "Why certainly I can", then get busy and find a way to do it."  T. Roosevelt

"Put your creed in your deed."   Emerson

"When asked if you can do something, tell'em "Why certainly I can", then get busy and find a way to do it."  T. Roosevelt

(post #83843, reply #6 of 12)

To others and OP,


Depending on what your AHJ (authorities having jurisdiction) require there are a lot of minor variation in what is required and accepted.  And many places say one thing and accept others not really knowing what there getting.  When a AHJ says wet stamp they usually an original stamp which may or may not be a stored image of a stamp.  They may also want an original signature and dated in ink that is a different color than the stamp.  Depending on how good your copier or scanner is, you may see coped images that are almost indistinguishable from wet stamped and signed originals.  What they are saying is they want an original stamp and signature and will not accept a copied stamp and signature, they they may accept a printed stamp field that is then signed.


There are as many variations on these rules as there are jurisdictions.  Don't even get me started on embossed stamps on mylar or velum and/or stamped and signed cover pages versus stamped and signed every page.  Sealing (stamping) and signing every page gets to be a real pain when you need multiple copies and there are hundred pages and you have separated engineers for the mechanicals, electrical, plumbing, civil, and/or structural.


Good luck in getting the AHJ's to give you a clear statement of what they want.


Jim H


Edited 9/9/2008 12:08 am by jvhannah

(post #83843, reply #7 of 12)

I know what you mean about getting the right thing to the building department. It took me 7 trips to get a set of plans through for a simple 350 sq/ft addition, no HVAC, no plumbing.
I thought I was going to have to get the check I gave them for the fees "stamped and sealed".

Greg

(post #83843, reply #8 of 12)

I've had building departments and architects who insisted on wet stamps. But it's been a while.

I've never heard a real good reason for it - They generally just have too much time on their hands and are dreaming up things to be picky about.

.

The past few years we've gone to sending in drawings electronically and getting the seals back in PDF files. Then we can send the layout and drawings to our customers in PDF format. Sure is nice.

And a heck of a lot faster.

I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man. [Thomas Jefferson]

(post #83843, reply #10 of 12)

As others have said, it means an original stamp (or signature, depending on the state) done with real ink and not an electronic one.  They may want the stamp or signature done in a different color ink than the drawing so that it's obvious it's an original.


We were just talking about this yesterday here in my office (I'm an engineer.)  The last time I checked our state engineering/architecture board specifically says electronic signatures are not allowed, but plenty of people are doing it anyway.  It can be a pain but personally I get nervous about the idea of an electronic copy of my signature floating around out there where anyone using Autocad could cut and paste it on a drawing I didn't do.  Sure, it would be easy enough for someone to scan my signature or photocopy it and do the same thing, but I still feel better not doing it.