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What do you use to *extend the tip* of the caulk gun

mobiledynamics's picture

I think I'm going to have to give it a try, but I need to go into a very tight cut out....and try to fill up at least a 1 1/4" hole with some  uretane caulk (NP1). Not sure if it will hold, but it's at least  15inches of depth so I just plan to use a copper piper and attempt to fit it into the nozzle of the caulk tub and trigger squeeze from there...hoping it works.

 

What's you tactic for something like this...

15" (post #191266, reply #1 of 6)

That's a long ways.

Have sucessfully extended caulk tubes with drinking straws and plastic tubing - never tried copper tubing - that would be handy for you because of rigidity.......

In both cases the caulk tube-to-extension  joint was made with Tyvek seam tape - very stick stuff.

As an aside, the Tyvek seam tape is the best tape I have found for sealing the end of an open caulk tube -- caulk remains usable for at least a couple of months, you will have to re-stab the end of the tube but the "plug" is generally very shallow and clears easily by wasting an ounce or so.

Jim 

Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

As an aside, the Tyvek seam (post #191266, reply #4 of 6)

As an aside, the Tyvek seam tape is the best tape I have found for sealing the end of an open caulk tube -- caulk remains usable for at least a couple of months, you will have to re-stab the end of the tube but the "plug" is generally very shallow and clears easily by wasting an ounce or so.

You're not doing it quite right.  When you seal the tip, fold the tape around the tip loosely, then seal off the sides and pump a small blob of caulk into the area just above the tip.  Then when you remove the seal, most of the cured caulk is outside the tip, in that blob.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Thanks (post #191266, reply #6 of 6)

I'll have to try that!

Jim

Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

1 1/4" x 15" deep? (post #191266, reply #2 of 6)

Are you trying to fill the full 15" of depth?

If so, a better solution would be to pack the hole most of the way with some type of backer rod then caulk the last 1/2" or so.

Or how about using a expanding foam and just caulk the last 1/2"?

 

Terry

It's a 2 1/2 hole filled with (post #191266, reply #3 of 6)

It's a 2 1/2 hole filled with electrical control cable, condensate line and HVAC linesets with insulation...


The goal is to just *seal* the hole from weather and bugs...
 When you look at it from the outside of the hole, due to how the copper takes a bend with the insulation, it appears to be failry snug. However, when looking at the hole from the interior cutout, there is definately sunlight, and room in the 2 1/2" hole.


My plan is to 1st fill the brick portion of the hole with NP1. Then the cinderblock which I am still debating...probably will either pack it with (duct putty) or jam backer rod and then caulk the enterior end.

 

I plan to shoot some of the low expanding foam and see how good or bad this stuff if (Hilti gun with their 812 foam). The last time I used expanding foam, it was the Greatstuff about 10 years ago, and it was quite a BEAR to remove or cut. This was not their Low Expanding Foam. If I was to use foam, it would need to have some give, bearing the fact that there is hvac and electrical lines in the hole...

I plan to shoot some of the (post #191266, reply #5 of 6)

I plan to shoot some of the low expanding foam and see how good or bad this stuff if (Hilti gun with their 812 foam). The last time I used expanding foam, it was the Greatstuff about 10 years ago, and it was quite a BEAR to remove or cut.

Lemme get this straight -- you don't like foam because it's a bear to remove, but you're going to fill a hole to a depth of 15" with caulk??


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville