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Valhalco LifeTime Wood Treatment

ArtiSand's picture

Greetings folks,
I am looking for anyone who has had any experience with a product called LifeTime Wood Treatment made by a Canadian company (Valhalla i think). The claim is that this is a 100% non-toxic one time wood treatment that protects and preserves the life of the wood (i think i saw some mention of petrification on the web site). I am in the middle of using it on a project for a friend of mine who found it online. I am applying it to White Cedar for an arbor, spiral stair, and ramp. Once applied the wood takes on an aged grey-brown patina (certainly not the look for everyone but i can appreciate it). It seems to be a very benign product, looks like a mix of herbs and minerals that you mix with water...so the question is can this not be too good to be true? I can't find any customer reviews online. Anyone heard of this? Oh, one other thing i noticed is that some of the cut ends (end grain) of the White Cedar turned a bright magenta-like color about 20 minutes after application of LifeTime...

(post #157766, reply #1 of 23)

I have used this product. My understanding is that it is one of the few allowed in the National parks.

I thought I'd give this (post #157766, reply #2 of 23)

I thought I'd give this thread a bump since I'm also interested in this product. I haven't had any sucess with Cabot's Bleaching Oil even though it says it will turn wood gray. I'm trying to acheive a barn wood look.

On their website they refer (post #157766, reply #3 of 23)

On their website they refer to it as a stain and I also notice that none of their recommended uses include ground contact so apparently it isn't a wood preservative. I'd be very skeptical that any spray on product would be doing much more than staining, especially at that price.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

On their website..... (post #157766, reply #9 of 23)

their website, with respect, does NOT refer to it as a woodstain, you can buy stain from them OR you can buy the wood treatment with a stain already added to it. I did not know you could spray it on  - is that correct, it would make the job easier.By the way The Canadian National Parks Authority ues this product on log cabins, fences, benches etc

Regards

Well yes, actually that's the (post #157766, reply #13 of 23)

Well yes, actually that's the only way they do refer to it. They cal it a "wood treatment" but make reference to it as a stain. Here are some quotes from their website.

 

"This product is unique to the world of stains. In this age of concern about our environment, both consumers and contractors are very receptive to products that are low-toxic and friendly to nature."

 

"........LifeTime is priced below several nationally advertised stains....."

 

"Q1: What is LifeTime Wood Treatment?

A: LifeTime is a highly effective wood treatment which beautifies ourdoor wood for a LifeTime of enjoyment"

 

"Unlike some wood stains, LifeTime contains no poisons or toxic ingredients"

 

"LifeTime is priced below several nationally advertised chemical applications and stains"

 

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

There's not a wood (post #157766, reply #4 of 23)

There's not a wood preservative made that lives up to its claims.  Sikkens and, IIRC, Cabots make some of the best, but they are really stains.  (And even those need to be reapplied every 5 years or so.)  Any "clear" product lets to much sun through and the sun, as much as the, rain, does the damage.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Any "clear" product lets to (post #157766, reply #5 of 23)

Any "clear" product lets to much sun through and the sun, as much as the, rain, does the damage.

 

It's the UV rays from the sun that do the damage, and some clear products do block them.  A product does not have to be opaque to protect from the sun.

lifetime wood treatment (post #157766, reply #6 of 23)

i bought some of this , and it looks like it has some sort of basil and maybe dried mushrooms in it,if this is a preservative for wood why would it have this in it .?anybody know whats the deal here?

ECO WOOD TREATMENTS BETTER (post #157766, reply #7 of 23)

hello  i think youll find eco wood treatment works much better than the other product , we bought some at home depot.ca and it works great  doesent have all the funny particles in it and turns the wood a nice silvery colour , it looks great on our house  we just used a pump sprayer and it went on very easy   andy99  colorado

Maybe a good dose of (post #157766, reply #8 of 23)

     GOOGLE SPAM ! ! !

                                                              Courtesy of Jason Revson.

Joe H

My first experience with (post #157766, reply #10 of 23)

My first experience with Lifetime was about ten years ago. I build a small deck with SPF, using pressure treated for posts and washed everything with LifeTime.

This past summer, I returned to that house to build another little deck and had a chance to inspect the old one. It is in perfect condition barring a few splits and cracks. The owners applied a couple of coats of a solid stain since I built it, but nothing else.

I did put tar paper on the tops of the joists so they would be OK anyway but the decking and many of the joints would normally be half rotted by now. That stuff works.

I'm guessing it is mainly borax salts, but I do not know.

Ron

lifetime wood treatment (post #157766, reply #11 of 23)

what a scam this product is , we had some lifetime wood treatment anaylized and founf dried flowers.dried mushrooms. dried basil, and dried oregano. what king of wood treatment is this, ? class action on the way

Care to expand? (post #157766, reply #12 of 23)

And what brand was this lifetime you had tested?

Nothing wrong with organic ingredients if they work.

thanks.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Lifetime wood treatment (post #157766, reply #14 of 23)

This is far more than just a stain. The treatment kills the sugars in the wood leaving no way for molds to grow, hence no rot. Also works extremely well to age lumber to obtain the look of old barnwood.

I have used this product in an extreme environment in Colorado with temperatures from 90 deg. to - 35 deg. and snowfall acumulations upwards of 500 inches in a season. The melting season ruined untreated decks and caused little to no damage to deck lumber treated with Lifetime.

As far as contact with the ground goes, ask any professional carpenter what he thinks of that and DO what he says!

Which "natural " ingredient (post #157766, reply #15 of 23)

Which "natural " ingredient is it that "kills the sugars"  and prevents mold from growing? It's pretty hard to believe that we've all been led a merry chase with having to use redwood, cedar or PT wood to get rot resistance when the answer was in our spice cabinet all along.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

This makes me shake my head. (post #157766, reply #16 of 23)

This makes me shake my head.

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

Really! Which way is it (post #157766, reply #17 of 23)

Really! Which way is it shaking and why?

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

I should have said THIS (post #157766, reply #18 of 23)

I should have said THIS PRODUCT makes me shake my head - I agree with you that it sounds like informercial bs.

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

We told you not to sniff the (post #157766, reply #19 of 23)

We told you not to sniff the stuff!!


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

It's just oregano. Really. (post #157766, reply #20 of 23)

It's just oregano. Really.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

That's what you tell the (post #157766, reply #21 of 23)

That's what you tell the narc, anyway.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

love this product - I've used (post #157766, reply #22 of 23)

love this product - I've used in on three house projects now, and hate it whenever I have to use another stain product. Take lifetime over any other. No thumbmarks, no multi coat hassle, no toxic nasty chemicals. Love the silver patina. It really works. Also tinted it grey and black with a water based tint for an open joint rainscreen. It all looks good. Highly recommend to anyone! Why doesn't everyone use this? I have no idea! Skeptical folks, give it a go (it's only 20$). I think you'll be pleasantly suprised. 

Secret ingredients of Lifetime/Eco, etc. (post #157766, reply #23 of 23)

I checked out Lifetime at the Home Hardware the other day and it looks like green powder mixed with tea and a white powder. So, my suspicions are that a $20.00 packet contains 20 grams of the following:

  • Ferrous Oxide - a green powder, used to turn wood grey by reacting with the tannins
  • Tea - to boost the tannin levels on the wood surface
  • Baking Soda - also turns wood grey, might help bring out the tannins in the wood

You can buy Ferrous Oxide just about anywhere for dirt cheap (Garden Supply stores, or how about this: http://www.artantiquequebec.com/en/cadre.htm?http://www.artantiquequebec.com/en/product-maintenance.htm - and find it by going to Products > Powder Pigments > Ferrous Oxide -- they sell the stuff for $16/kilogram which is the same as buying 50 packets of Lifetime if they were pure Ferrous Oxide, or 32 cents a packet). I suspect Ferrous Oxide first because it's a green powder, second because the MSDS for Lifetime (which doesn't reveal the chemical name) is very similar to the MSDS for Ferrous Oxide. Compare: http://www.loghelp.com/images/document/MSDS_LifeTime.pdf (Lifetime MSDS) with http://www.teck.com/DocumentViewer.aspx?elementId=115492&portalName=tc (Ferrous Sulphate MSDS).

As for the tea, with certain woods, like cedar, it would be unnecessary. See http://www.woodfinishsupply.com/Tannin.html for some ideas on this one.

Baking soda, everyone knows where to get that and how expensive it it.

So I'm guessing for about 20 cents you can make your own home brew (pun intended) and spend the rest on a real brew at the pub.

Any other attempts at reverse engineering this 60 year old family recipe?

Here are some other brews a lot older than 60 years: http://www.woodfinishsupply.com/FrenchPolishBookPreview.pdf