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Truss repair needed in Chicago

GadgetGal's picture

South side of Chicago. Garage, 26' x 40' 8/12 roof, built in 1928.

I need experts please. I know I'll need a structural engineer, but I'm interested in getting the best crew to do the work correctly. Any recommendations are appreciated.

One sagging roof truss and another truss has stress fracture along one of the bottom cords and some intermediate rafters are sagging.


Thank you for any info!

I'm guessing the main problem (post #188061, reply #1 of 8)

I'm guessing the main problem is the 3/4 ton of lumber that's likely been stored up there for 50 years.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

There is lumber up there that (post #188061, reply #2 of 8)

There is lumber up there that was never safe to walk on in many areas. Some of it is only 1/4" thick.  I removed a large amount and was going to take the rest down but some of it that is 2x8x8' is nailed to the bottom cords of the truss and I was afraid to remove it in case it was some kind of lateral bracing.


Hack work was also done years ago to the rafter and truss tails that were rotting away from water damage.

I know I shoud not have let it go this long, but can't change that!

It may well be that the most (post #188061, reply #3 of 8)

It may well be that the most sensible thing to do is to take the roof off and install new factory trusses.  You could sister new pieces to the ones pictured and take care of most of the immediate structural issues (probably what I'd do), but it wouldn't do anything for the rot and other issues, and it might not pass inspection in Chicago.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

(BTW, is that the baddest (post #188061, reply #4 of 8)

(BTW, is that the baddest part of town?)


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

And I'm meaner than a (post #188061, reply #5 of 8)

And I'm meaner than a junkyard dog! Ha, ha

Inspection in Chicago could be a breeze if the son of a local union official is the inspector.

I was thinking of sistering  the bottom cords and putting some plywood gussets at the tails. The hips that are stick framed are in excellent shape. I was wondering if just a partial roof removal would work so I could save the hips.

 

 

Can't help you there.  My (post #188061, reply #6 of 8)

Can't help you there.  My hips went a long time ago.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

I agree with DanH (post #188061, reply #8 of 8)

I agree with DanH, the cheepest/fastest thing to do is to sister to existing. 16" deep LVLs would be my choice for 26' spans but that might reduce useable interior ceiling height . If the buget allows, tear it off and build a new roof structure and go to your maximum height of 15' ...or  do whats popular on the northside and make a rooftop deck. A 26x40 rooftop deck is a huge plus for resale! Think about it.

You could give these folks a call. (post #188061, reply #7 of 8)

http://manorredevelopment.com/

If they can't get to it they will probably know someone who can.