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Hey Pro-Deck, how big's yours?

Ken_Layfield's picture

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Bob, whats the biggest deck you've built? Here's one me and two other guys built about 8 years ago. Its 8 feet wide and 1764 feet long.

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I not sure the attachment came through last time

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Here's the starting section

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The PT lumber alone cost 64k

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It took 6 weeks of 12 hour days to complete

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Its built on the shoreline of Lake Ontario in Burlington Bay

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I threw this up a few years back. Took me a month or so. I had to work a couple of weekends too. It is about 18 feet wide and 3100 miles long. Man those stones were heavy! I was ready for a beer and a backrub when this was done.

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Nice job Ken- The biggest deck I've built was a 1600 sq ft. deck and it took a month.
Bob

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Bob: Again, superb work. I am glad I am not trying that. I would probably be trying to build it in my shop and then hire 142 guys to load and set it in place. Ha

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Bob, Here's the smallest deck I've built. A mudroom entrance on a historic home.

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Here's a detail. Gee, I love having a scanner now!

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Really nice work Bob! It's a shame those steps only lead down to 10sq ft of yard.

The deck IS a beauty though.

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Thanks Mike- Actually this guy didn't want any yard to mow. He just wanted to look out at the other mowed lawn.This deck was a scorcher.It faces West so you got the sun all day.
Bob

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Great work Bob. Are most of your decks your own design? You seem to have a signature deck seat.

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Thanks Ken- Yes, I design all my decks to suit the customers needs.These people had the need to throw big Parties.
I take all the wall dimensions and sit down at my computer on floorplan plus 3d and design a 3d and scale drawing to show the customer with my proposal.
After they sign the proposal the real work begins.
Take out!-of materials(not food)
layout!- of piers
dig!- holes for piers
packin lumber_ from the front to the back
"you know the drill"
Bob

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I think CAD is great. I designed and built an octagonal and rectangle combination deck for some friends a few months ago. The ability to get precise measurements off the plan was invaluable. I also like how you can change dimensions quickly.(the octagonal part was enlarged to fit new table)

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Hows this for size....

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two decks in Philly.

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This deck is attached to the back of a row home. For head room the beams are at the sides and the joists run side to side. PT framing and decking grade cedar for flooring and railing.

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Nice Deck Wooddoctor- Tell us about the post caps. Did you make them or buy them and install.
Good job!
Bob

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Nice work Nigel-Building that fan rail design must have been fun.Is that a code to put a railing around the hot tub where you are or are you just keeping the kids out of there?
Bob

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Does that fanrail meet code? Looks great but I can see a little bugger's head getting stuck in the vertice

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Here's a little balcony....

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Nice deck Mike-When it starts to age like this I think it is a good idea to paint all the rail and fascia the trim color(white)and leave the decking natural.This ties the deck to the house visually.I put one coat of oil base primer and two coats of latex over that.
Bob

(post #127856, reply #24 of 37)

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That deck with the fan railing is about 10 years old and at the time passed fine. The way things are going railings will be solid walls soon. The inspector wanted the hot tub gated before he would sign off on it.

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This shows the style of bench I like to build.

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Thanks Bob. Means something coming from you. I like your painting idea, but the owner stained it this past summer. Maybe the next one....

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Nigel-You spent alot of time on that deck. Looks great! What fastening system did you use on the decking? The bench is very unique and inviting to sit on. How did you fasten the diagonal posts supporting the back of the bench?
I like the herring bone design of the decking as well.
Good Job.
Bob

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The decking is face screwed with stainless because of the cedar. The rail posts are rabbited and bolted/lagged to the rim joist. for the benches the rabbit is angled at 15 degrees and to get the position right installed when the top rail is run. I run a 1" wide dividing strip between the herring bone sections because of alinement of the 45 degree mitres. Another reason is no 'inline joins' in the decking. I do get a little nuts when building a deck. I router all the edges and sand many areas that most leave.

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That cozy corner bench is "just right" in the words of Goldilocks

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This is one of my more difficult three level decks.