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Raised grain on stained oak after applying waterbase varnish - help!

Marymoy's picture

We have stained some unfinished oak posts for a new railing with Saman brand water based wood stain - they looked great after this step.   The we applied a 1 st coat of Samon brand waterbase varnish. The vanish has really raised the grain in the oak. It said to sand between coats of varnish& I thought this might help but it looks like the stain is being sanded off where the grain is raised so I quit sanding.  Now what? Should I keep sanding, and will be able to restrain areas where stain is removed (there will still be varnish on many places) . Or do I apply another coat of varnish & will the raised fibres still sand out then?  0r is there something else I could do?

thanks...getting a little stressed  . This wood is expensive!

You apply shelac -- before (post #207390, reply #1 of 6)

You apply shelac -- before the first layer of varnish.

Or just put another layer or two of varnish on it (after very light sanding) and hope for the best.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

I recommend using  #0000 (post #207390, reply #2 of 6)

I recommend using  #0000 steel wool (super fine) rather than sanding.  Make sure that the  coat has dried before trying to abrade it down and then finish it off with varnish.

When you plan to begin a remodeling project, it's best to do your research so you will have the best results without going broke.

[Dupe] (post #207390, reply #3 of 6)

[Dupe]


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

I would sand then reapply a (post #207390, reply #4 of 6)

I would sand then reapply a light coat of stain.  Make sure to remove ALL the excess stain!  Then varnish again.

This is a great reason to not (post #207390, reply #5 of 6)

This is a great reason to not use water-based stains on bare wood.

Having said that, if you would have wetted the wood with water it would have raised the grain prior to the stain, which can be sanded smooth once dry leaving a surface much less prone to raising with additional treatments of water-based stuff.

 

Beer was created so carpenters wouldn't rule the world.

Yeah, this is the sort of (post #207390, reply #6 of 6)

Yeah, this is the sort of thing you learn by screwing it up once.  Or twice. Or three times.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville