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Shop layout tips

DanMorrison's picture

Shop layout tips (post #205334)

We're about ready to begin the serious work of setting up the garage shop at the Project House. We have replaced the overhead door with new carriage house doors, insulated and hung drywall, replaced the windows and added a subfloor. Oh yea, and we added a subpanel to power the shop along with benchtop-height outlets.

I'll dig around for our rough floor plan and post it here later this weekend, but in general we're looking for tips on setting up a remodeler's shop. Ladder and cord storage, lumber racks, tool storage, etc.

When I was setting up my own shops, I used to try to follow a workflow for cabinet making: back up my truck to the door, slide plywood off the tailgate and onto the table saw. Outfeed fed the miter saw station to cut parts to length, then assembly tables towards the back and a finishing room all the way back.

The spaces next to the overhead door were used for long skinny tools, like digging bars, long bar clamps, etc. and cords usually hung on a wall towards those front corners. Ladder storage could be difficult depending on the shop -- some of the compact garages I set up (rentals) affirded little extra room for bulky stuff like that.

Tips?

Techniques?

Tactical advice?

Dan

UPDATED: ADDED POSSIBLE FLOOR PLAN AND ELECTRICAL PLAN

[Click the thumbnail images to see a larger version]

Dan Morrison
 

Tip (post #205334, reply #1 of 14)

ALL outlets on walls, bench or not, should be placed well above 48".  No matter how neat and organized a remodelers shop, there's always temp storage of material .

Plywood, drywall, whatever sheet goods we use will always be leaned against the wall.  Either short term or a lifetime.  Remember too we usually put them on blocks, off the floor.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


In some cases it's not dumb (post #205334, reply #3 of 14)

In some cases it's not dumb to put the outlets up at about the 7 foot mark.  Or install twist-lock outlets on the ceiling and have extension cables dangle down where needed.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

We ran conduit along the (post #205334, reply #5 of 14)

We ran conduit along the slab and made a couple of floor outlets for the tablesaw and mitersaw station. The conduit was covered when we ran subfloor over foam over the slab.

For the lights, we left ceiling outlets to plug fluorescent into. I reckon we can install a few twist-lock outlets up there. We will need a lot of light for work, but also for photography and video shooting, so the extra outlets will come in handy.

Dan Morrison
 

Check, but it was dumb luck (post #205334, reply #4 of 14)

Check, but it was dumb luck -- we were just shooting for bench height. As it turns out, when we had all of the drywal leaning against the wall, the outlets were well above them.

Dan Morrison
 

Really should ask the "ideas" question in advance of beginning. (post #205334, reply #6 of 14)

That way luck won't have to step in.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Yep, don't you just hate to (post #205334, reply #7 of 14)

Yep, don't you just hate to hear that the interior designer wants to move the window over six inches hust as you are finishing the paint on the trim?!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

Thanks for the tip, (post #205334, reply #8 of 14)

Thanks for the tip, Calvin.

That was sort of my reason for asking for layout tips while the shop is still empty.

Dan Morrison
 

Use the ceiling (post #205334, reply #2 of 14)

Depending on what you have available in height - make use of the top few feet.

Mine is 10'.

I have a "mezzanine" shelf that is 30"' down from the ceiling and 2' wide running along a side and end wall. All sorts of bulky items are up there - part bags of insulation, boxes of assorted-related supplies (Boxes of electrical parts, plumbing, etc.), job site heaters, boxes of coil nails and the like. It is simple construction - cleat on the wall, threaded rod attached in the trusses and to a 2x4 for the front support with 2' x 12' temblend (Noviply) for the shelf. The only real change i would do is make the wall cleat 8" or more tall. I find that cleat handy for hanging items.

I also have a number of "H" shaped brackets that are bolted to the ceiling (with the "H" laying on its side). These hold long, light stuff that has a tendency to get lost when piled anywhere else.

My workbench is free standing and can be moved as needed - wall space is too valuable to use for it.

Terry

Got a photo of that mezzanine (post #205334, reply #9 of 14)

Got a photo of that mezzanine shelf and sideways 'H' bracket?

Dan Morrison
 

One suggestion I would make: (post #205334, reply #10 of 14)

One suggestion I would make:  Put EVERYTHING on rolling locking casters.  You really have no idea of what you will be whipping up in that shop, so flexability is everything.

YAY!  I love WYSISYG editing!  And Spellcheck!

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Sliding miter saw placement (post #205334, reply #11 of 14)

The slider is the most difficult piece of machinery to place as you need all that room behind it as well as to the right and left. Some shops pop a hole through a wall so they can get this beast up against it. I'd be interested in seeing if you have this radial arm replacement tool in the shop how you have placed it so that it is easy to use and not in the way when not being used.

Air supply outlets/couplings (post #205334, reply #12 of 14)

In addition to whatever available wall couplings, I would put some on the ceiling over assembly areas.

I have found whether hoses drop from the ceiling or are at workbench level - they still manage to be in the wrong place sometimes. Having both locations covered might save some aggrevation.

Terry

Storing plywood pieces (post #205334, reply #13 of 14)

The best way to store plywood pieces is to stand them up against a wall with the grain running vertically. Just stack all pieces together ignoring species, thickness, or width. As long as they are arranged by height you can easily see what you have.

For several years, when I was (post #205334, reply #14 of 14)

For several years, when I was doing a lot of plywood and some drywall work in the house, I had a sort of drywall trolley for storing pieces.  (It was put together from some pieces of steel angle and scrap wood, with fairly heavy-duty casters.)  It allowed the collection to be kept in a corner and pulled out when access was needed.  Greatly reduced the problems with thumbing through the stack to find a particular piece.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville