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What about walls?

DanMorrison's picture

What about walls? (post #205466)

I remember watching an old episode of This Old House, where Norm was setting up a garage shop and he said something like:

"Rule number 1: Wood paneling. That allows me to hang cabinets anywhere I want and move them if needed."

(Sorry for the poor paraphrasing, Norm).

What you you all say?

Wood paneling (plywood)?

French cleats running the perimeter?

Pegboard with magic marker outlines of the tools that go there?

 

And on the topic of cabinets, I'm sure there are some strong opinions about what to do there.

Cabinets that were salvaged from a remodel?

Build shop-grade cabinets to the dimensions you need rather than salvaging someone else's kitchen cabs?

Cabinets are dumb, use shelves?

Dan

Dan Morrison
 

I thought cabinets for a shop (post #205466, reply #1 of 9)

I thought cabinets for a shop were stu[pid until my shelves got full of dust and more dust

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

If you have time....... (post #205466, reply #2 of 9)

wait for salvage.

If you have money, build your own.

Sure, dimensions might be different, but from what I've seen-not too darn much.  Salvaged flush bifold closet doors make for some nice light yet sturdy foot deep shelves.  Open shelves with buckets work well, big boxes of nails, screws and other heavy goods scream salvaged free standing metal shelving.

The look is rather chaotic, but if storage is needed on the cheap-salvage works real well.

 

In a shop where cabinets are built?  maybe not.  But, salvaged boxes with your own good looking or all similar doors attached-sweet.

 

Again, everything above 4' for the same reason.  I'd build movable bases geared to table saw height for the lowers.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


The main problem with (post #205466, reply #3 of 9)

The main problem with salvaged is that they're likely not built heavy enough for shop use.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

That is the wrongest statement I've ever read. (post #205466, reply #4 of 9)

You've got to be kidding?

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


You clearly haven't been (post #205466, reply #5 of 9)

You clearly haven't been watching the debates.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

That's crazy! All a cab dor (post #205466, reply #6 of 9)

That's crazy!

All a cab dor needs to do is opem and close. No need for heavy duty!!!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

Instead of Pegboad, I used (post #205466, reply #7 of 9)

Instead of Pegboad, I used 3/4" plywood everywhere.  For hanging tools, I use dowel screws - the kind that are wood threaded on one side and machine threaded on the other.  Over the exposed machine threaded side, I put on those little rubber caps that go over the ends of wire shelves.  I've got all my cordless tools mounted there, as well as the chargers for the tools.

YAY!  I love WYSISYG editing!  And Spellcheck!

____________________________________________________

Plywood or other durable (post #205466, reply #8 of 9)

Plywood or other durable surface walls make sense in a shop. In some cases, walls may need to meet fire code regulations, such as garage walls that adjoin a house.

Wood cleats, not necessarily French cleats, could be run, not only to mount cabinets and shelves on but also to provide attachment for hooks, nails, whatever you want to use for a hanger.

Peg board tool storage is pretty handy for the things you grab regularly as well as for things that don't fit in drawers or cabinets, bow saws, framing squares and such. You don't need outlines to see a tool is missing and chances are, we'll be changing things from time to time.

Recently, I'm getting rid of most open shelves and using cabinets with doors. They help keep the dust and debris out plus, they hide the clutter. I'm also getting rid of salvaged cabinets, benches and all the hodge podge of various shop stuff that doesn't meet my storage needs and just looks out of place.

Personally, I prefer neat, clean and organized. No easy task in a woodworkers shop. I've been using melamine for my new cabinets. It's inexpensive, bright, easy to clean and you can get panels with shelf holes already drilled and shelves already edge banded, no finishing. Takes no time to build the cabinets but it can take quite awhile to move and organize stuff.

We use alot of specialized tools in the trade. We have tools for construction, demolition, finish work, drywall, concrete, sheet metal, painting, electrical, plumbing, mechanic work, machinist work, sharpening, the list goes on and may include our own homeowner stuff. Not only do we have the materials and supplies we are working on but we have leftover stuff that has value and takes up space. Fasteners alone can account for quite a pile.

After years in the trade, I became an instructor and attended college to get my degree in voc-tech education. The shop at the college was set up to be the exemplary shop. They even painted every piece of equipment the same color, operator zones marked on the floor, non slip tape in those zones, emergency egress pathes marked, safety posters and operator check lists hung next to machines. Tops of cabinets were slanted to prevent use for storage. You couldn't lose a pencil in the place since it would stand out like a neon light but this was an educational laboratory, not a full time working shop. A real shop isn't going to be up to those standards but I'd like to come close. Spent too many years in shops that were the opposite. Maybe I need to slant all my bench tops, LOL.

Beat it to fit / Paint it to match

hi to all its very good (post #205466, reply #9 of 9)

hi to all

its very good idea and method you have shared here for us ..thanks ..