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Is anybody still there?? Miter saw problem.

mike mahan's picture

Is anybody still there?? Miter saw problem. (post #215930)

I recently tried to cut oak base shoe on a Makita sliding compound saw. The saw grabbed the moulding and tore it apart with such force that it was scary. It continued to do this. I switched from a 50 tooth Diablo blade to a 90. Same problem. I tried my DeWalt no problem. I tried a Ridgid basic 10" saw no problem. I finished the job with the Ridgid saw using the 90 tooth blade. I checked and the Makita only turns 3200 rpm; the Ridigid turns over 5000. Could this be the problem? Any body else experience this? I didn't much care for the Makita before this (It liked to grab Trex). No I kinda hate the saw. Did I do something wrong? I've been using miter saws for over 40 years and never had this problem.

how'd you get in here? (post #215930, reply #1 of 4)

I thought the doors were welded shut here...

Is the space between the 2 halves of the fence wider on the Makita than the other saws ? I have that issue from time to time with

my Makita nonslider when cutting small sticks. For best results the workpiece must bridge the fence gap or be backed up with a

sacraficial piece.

.

I've seen similar problems (post #215930, reply #2 of 4)

I've seen similar problems (though not on a sliding miter) when everything wasn't quiet square and the workpiece danced around a bit.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Mike (post #215930, reply #3 of 4)

Does this happen when bringing the blade down into the work, or returning the blade up?

On both my old Hitachi slider and Kapex the shattering of small trim sometimes happens.  Letting the blade come to a stop b/4 moving anything usually eliminates the problem.

Slight misalignment of the back fences could also contribute.  A sacrificial fence to straighten and narrow the gap as old suggests helps.

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Glad somebody's still here. (post #215930, reply #4 of 4)

This happened on both slide and chop. It happened during the cut. The gap in the fence was no different with the Makita than the other saws. It happened with such violence that it actually bent the Makita fence. The pieces I was working required constantly changing the angle so the smallest gap practical would be from one 45 to the other. There was no bevel.