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Best framing hammer

Montanaman's picture
What's the best reasonably priced framing hammer? I saw one that only weighed 16 oz. but nailed like it weighed 28 oz.

Montana (post #213060, reply #1 of 14)

I'm old school.  So old trying to retire.

but, if framing houses again it would always be a wood handle.  Vaughn smooth or wafflehead.  Used to use something heavier but I think they have a 22oz.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


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Thanks for the info.  I'm (post #213060, reply #5 of 14)

Thanks for the info.  I'm checking in to the Vaughn.

+1 on wood hammer.   But (post #213060, reply #2 of 14)

+1 on wood handle hammer, waffle,  I always liked 28 oz for floor sheathing and toenails into sill plates, 22 oz for everything else.  

 

But only if the compressor breaks, otherwise N88.

I appreciate the help. (post #213060, reply #6 of 14)

I appreciate the help.

Best hammer ever is the one I (post #213060, reply #3 of 14)

Best hammer ever is the one I left hanging on a fence in Rio Bravo, Mexico about 20 years ago.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

That sounds like a good (post #213060, reply #7 of 14)

That sounds like a good excuse for a trip.

I've never felt bad about it (post #213060, reply #9 of 14)

I've never felt bad about it -- I'm sure the people there put it to good use.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

another geezer perspective... (post #213060, reply #4 of 14)

I own and haved used  wood handled hammers from 13-28 oz.  Like these other old cranks reporting thus far, my production nailing is past and if not for nail guns I'd be done with nailing.  But I always have a 20 oz. blue grass wood handled straight claw at reach.

If circumstances forced me to do any production hand nailing I would test a titanium model but they are not so hot for chisel striking or moving walls or whatever around. 

.

Thanks for the help.   I (post #213060, reply #8 of 14)

Thanks for the help.  

I can't bring myself to pay $200 for a hammer.  That's about what they get for some of the titanium models.

 

 

 

In the olden days. (post #213060, reply #10 of 14)

When I started framing the weapon of choice for most, was a wooden handled Plumb rigging axe. I think it came in at 28 oz. As I was told the blade was not for cutting wood but for cutting nails. A swift swipe with the blade would cut or knock out most bent natils. For nail pulling there was a slot perpendicular to the blade that had incredible leverage. So incredible that you could break the handle. Most guys had the handle wrapped with pipe wrap tape as a preventative measure. The width of the blade was 3.5", which could be handy. I was told that it was for spacing skip sheathing on roofs, but I never did that. Plywood was the norm. I'm not quite that old. Vaughn made an axe, too, but nobody used it. I think I used a 28 oz hammer after I gave up the axe, but not for long. When I stopped hand nailing entirely I went to a 20 oz fiberglass handled Vaughn, which I still use. I've got a set; one smooth and one waffle. 

I've got a curved claw steel handle Eastwing that's the cats [JOBSITE WORD] for stripping forms. I'd sure hate to drive many nails with a steel handled hammer. 

I use the Vaughn 24 oz mill (post #213060, reply #11 of 14)

I use the Vaughn 24 oz mill face framer. Enough heft to drive 12 and 16d sinkers in two blows (if not using a nailgun) and leverage to yank nails and studs during demo. No issues with vibration. I wrap the fiberglass shank near the head in multiple layers of electrical tape. When the tape gets scarred up, I wrap it some more. I start the tape from scratch every 5 years or so. The fiberglass shank ittself has yet to see a gouge over the past 30 years. Also, I like the fact that from tip of claw to tip of handle is exactly 16". I don't think this is by coincidence. You can  get roughly the same model I have for about $35 which is still reasonable.

Best Frame Hammer (post #213060, reply #12 of 14)

When I started framing sheathing, subfloors, walls and roofs was all 1x6 t&g. Everything ran wild and the new kid got the handsaw (the non-electric kind) to cut the wild ends. Only thing we could get was a wood handeled Plumb or a steel shank leather handle Estwing. Us real men used the steel shank until most of us destroyed our elbows. Then we became smart real men and got wood or fiberglass. I found a graphite handled Estwing with straight claw waffle face 22oz. Bought the thing on the spot. It did such a good job absorbing the shock that I was able to get rid of the band I had to keep on my forearm. I used that hammer untill I retired and still have it for my honey doos. So that's my call for the best frame hammer. Estwing Graphite. For you youngsters a bit of advice. Forget about the real man stuff. It's a long way from your 20s to your 60s. Work smart. The job can hurt if you don't.
 

It's a long way from your 20s to your 60s. Work smart. (post #213060, reply #13 of 14)

No kidding!

and, those last few years are not just another single year, the sore geometrically progresses.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Just what I needed thanks (post #213060, reply #14 of 14)

Just what I needed thanks everyone for sharing your thoughts.

Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.