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nikkiwood's picture

I hate wearing gloves.

But the skin on my thumbs seems to be literally wearing out from years of doing this stuff, so I had to do something.

I've tried just about every kind of glove you can imagine -- including the kind football players wear (made by Ironclad), deerskin driver gloves, nitrile, etc.

The best I have come up with so far were recommended by a contractor friend:

PLAINSMAN: PREMIUM CABRETTA LEATHER

They are made of goatskin, cost $18.99 for a two pair pack at Sam's Club. If you size them so they fit tight, you have enough of a sense of feel so you can pick up a single 4d finishing nail -- which means you can do j just about any type of work without taking them off.

The leather is obviously thin, so they wear out in about a month, and they are not much good for cold weather. But at least the cracked skin on my thumbs is not bleeding anymore. Yeah, I have used every which kind of salve, including the stuff for a cow's udder (Bag Balm, I think it's called).

Anybody have suggestions for other gloves that might work for me????

******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-2010

(post #122639, reply #1 of 46)

Wondergloves.

They are a woven cotten - fiarly tough and close fitting, that have been dipped in liquid rubber on fingertips and palms. They look geeky, but I lovwe them. Fine feel through them and the rubber keeps them from soaking up misture from damp materials. It also wears well. I get a couple weeks out of a pair and buy them in bulk to get them for less than a couple bucks a pair.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #122639, reply #4 of 46)

I've worn similar types of gloves for about 8 years now....every day. I won't touch a thing in my truck without those gloves on. My hands are as soft as a babys #### and they don't hurt any more.


The kind I use have dots...rubber dots everywhere. I pay $10 per dozen.


blue


Warning! Be cautious when taking any framing advice from me. Although I have a lifetime of framing experience, all of it is considered bottom of the barrel by Gabe. I am not to be counted amongst the worst of the worst. If you want real framing information...don't listen to me..just ask Gabe!

"...

keep looking for customers who want to hire  YOU.. all the rest are looking for commodities.. are you  a commodity ?... if you get sucked into "free estimates" and  "soliciting bids"... then you are a commodity... if your operation is set up to compete as a commodity, then have at it..... but be prepared to keep your margins low and your overhead  high...."

From the best of TauntonU.

(post #122639, reply #6 of 46)

I would be interested in hearing about gloves that will keep my hands dry. The water from rain and snow is so loaded with acid that my hands start cracking within days of getting wet (I avoid the wet as much as possible). I now rotate as many as 10 pair of gloves in a day, but I'd like to find some other winter glove that keeps that melting snow off my skin.


For those of you with cracking problems...try keeping your hands out of city water. The bleach and flouride in it is terrible...especially when you've already soaked your hands all day in acid rain. When I moved to the country on a well, I noticed a big improvement.


blue


Warning! Be cautious when taking any framing advice from me. Although I have a lifetime of framing experience, all of it is considered bottom of the barrel by Gabe. I am not to be counted amongst the worst of the worst. If you want real framing information...don't listen to me..just ask Gabe!

"...

keep looking for customers who want to hire  YOU.. all the rest are looking for commodities.. are you  a commodity ?... if you get sucked into "free estimates" and  "soliciting bids"... then you are a commodity... if your operation is set up to compete as a commodity, then have at it..... but be prepared to keep your margins low and your overhead  high...."

From the best of TauntonU.

(post #122639, reply #21 of 46)

the wonder gloves do it. They keep water out unless you bury you paw in the bucket.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #122639, reply #23 of 46)

Thanks Piffin. I think I'm going to order a half case and give them a trial run this winter.


blue


Warning! Be cautious when taking any framing advice from me. Although I have a lifetime of framing experience, all of it is considered bottom of the barrel by Gabe. I am not to be counted amongst the worst of the worst. If you want real framing information...don't listen to me..just ask Gabe!

"...

keep looking for customers who want to hire  YOU.. all the rest are looking for commodities.. are you  a commodity ?... if you get sucked into "free estimates" and  "soliciting bids"... then you are a commodity... if your operation is set up to compete as a commodity, then have at it..... but be prepared to keep your margins low and your overhead  high...."

From the best of TauntonU.

(post #122639, reply #24 of 46)

Anything I can do to help put those hurricane clips on without frosting your pinkies!

;)

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #122639, reply #20 of 46)

My fingers used to be cracked all over the place all winter. Now, they have lost some calus but no more cracks and splits.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #122639, reply #2 of 46)

I have the same skin thing--eventually I had to go to a doctor to find out why all the skin around my right thumb was disintegrating, cracked and bleeding all the time.  They gave me some cortisone cream to get healed, then a lactose-based cream for regular use.  Best hand cream ever.  Bag balm is greasy, as is lanolin, and all the pretty-smelling creams out there.  This stuff works, it's called Lac-Hydrin.  When I got it several years ago it was only available in the US by prescription, but a friend in Canada brought me a few bottles.  Now it's available in the US in a slightly weaker version.


As for gloves, I like both the CLC and Ironclad gloves.  They only last a couple of months, and don't like solvents, but are still worth the price for the combination of dexterity and protection they allow.


Last winter I used up a couple pair of Ironclad's Cold Condition gloves; I heard they have a new version this year that I will have to pick up soon. 

 

 

(post #122639, reply #3 of 46)

I have been wearing Kinco pigskin gloves for several years.  My greatest fear is that they will stop making them.  The pigskin is as supple as high quality leather, but holds its shape better.  They are tougher than goat skin, deer skin, and leather.  There is a summer version which I wear until it gets to about 28 degrees.  The winter version has worked fine to around zero.  I have not tested them working below that.


The summer version is thin and gives a great sensitivity that has not hindered me in any way on any job.  The winter version is insulated and much thicker with an elastic seal.  You can still handle all framing tools with these gloves on.


The summer glove has a bright orange perforated section on the back of the hand with a fluorescent yellow stripe.  It is cooled well and comfortable even in hot weather.  I have not had a splinter when wearing these gloves.  The only place here in the Kansas City area that carries them is the Jeffries Ace Hardware farm store.


The summer gloves cost $6.47 and the winter version is about a buck more.


I framed an 1800SF house virtually alone on one pair of gloves this spring.  I have never had a splinter while using these, although a sharp metal splinter from a valley W flashing did get me about three weeks ago.  I plan on wearing out one pair per month when I am continuously employed.  The winter gloves last about three times as long.  I keep four or five pair as backup.  At about $2.00 per week for the summer gloves, this is one of the best investments I have ever made.


Les Barrett Quality Construction

 

(post #122639, reply #5 of 46)

I second the wondergloves.  For $2 a pair, they still last a while.  Not too hot in the summer, but still decent for winter.  The rubber coating tight on the skin actually helps keep body heat in.  Even in the really cold I've worn those under a heavier pair for added insulation.

ADH Carpentry & Woodwork


Quality, Craftsmanship, Detail

Neither cold, nor darkness will deter good people from hastening to the dreadful place to quench the flame.  They do it not for the sake of reward or fame; but they have a reward in themselves, and they love one another.

-Benjamin Franklin

(post #122639, reply #7 of 46)

The absolute best gloves that I have ever used as a framer are these  http://www.lfsinc.com/atlasgloves/graphics/370.black.large.web.jpg  They are made by Atlas Work gloves (which also make a white cotton blue palm glove that we also used to really like and use).  These things are great in the winter.  They aren't designed to keep your hands warm (but if you have the right thermals and are wearing a hat, your hands are more likely to stay warm), but for framing they are amazing.  I used them a few weeks ago to set up a footing and we use 6d duplex nails to nail our footing boards together and to the stakes.  No problem grabbing and holding the nails.  The other guy working with me has been framing for 25years and tried the gloves for the first time and couldn't belive how nice they are.  I stole a pair from his van today :-)


Everyone on our crew uses them now and loves them and they are about $5 a pair.  I keep a pair for about a month before the coating starts to rub off and they stink.  I haven't washed them yet, I just use the stinky ones when it rains. 


Here is the website that I found them on today, our lumberyard carries them. 


http://www.lfsinc.com/atlasgloves/work.htm

www.pioneerbuildersonline.com From Lot 30 Muirkirk

http://picasaweb.google.com/TimothyUhler                                     

(post #122639, reply #8 of 46)

I don't use gloves that often, but when I do, I also like the rubber coated cotten gloves - actually I think some of the ones I have are some type of kevlar - not sure


I really like the added grip.


Haven't settled on a specific brand yet, but, when I have to lift a bunch of cabinets into a house or carry sheetrock - the rubber grip makes the job much easier,


and I don't have to spit on my dusty calloused hands just to get a grip

(post #122639, reply #9 of 46)

I'm with tim on the atlas nitrile gloves... except for welding or keeping your hands dry, these gloves are about all you need.  Atlas also makes a "thermal" glove (quite a bit thicker) which are quite warm.  Of course, I'm in western washington where it rarely gets below freezing, just rains alot.  The atlas nitrile gloves are made from some kind of synthetic cloth which wont soak up water like cotton does.


Ian

(post #122639, reply #30 of 46)

Gotta love western WA eh?:-)  I'm in Port Orchard, near Bremerton.  Where are you located?

www.pioneerbuildersonline.com From Lot 30 Muirkirk

http://picasaweb.google.com/TimothyUhler                                     

(post #122639, reply #32 of 46)

Just north of Olympia, In Boston Harbor (about 60 inches of rain a year.)

(post #122639, reply #10 of 46)

I can get a 1/4" long screw out of that tiny change pocket in my jeans, while wearing those things. Or out of the regular pockets...

I can pick up a dime.

They are VERY good gloves.

The coating on mine always turns yellow and red, and then starts flaking off. I think it's the acids in my skin. But they do last for at least 6 months before that happens.



The person you offend today, may have been your best friend tomorrow

.

It's a small world. Until you have to walk home...

(post #122639, reply #11 of 46)

Thanks to you all.

A few questions:

PIFFIN / HOOK: I did a google search and found the Wonder Gloves, but they have many different models. Which have you found the best for your work? Do you mail order them or buy locally?

MIKE MAINES: Is the OTC Lac-Hydrin better/stronger than Cortaid, which I understand is also a cortisone cream? Cortaid seems to work better for me than any of the lanolin based stuff.

LES: turns out I am familiar with the Kinco thermal lined gloves for winter use; but do you have a model number for the unlined Kincos you use during the summer?

TIMUHLER / LUKA / IAN: Is it the AtlasFitâ„¢ model 300 you are talking about (first glove on the website Tim linked?

Thanks again for your help.

******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-2010

(post #122639, reply #13 of 46)

The next time I get down to Jeffries, I will buy a few more pairs.  I'll get the number then.


I tend to organize things in my shop to the point where the labels get stripped off of what I have and dumped.  This is so that when I need a pair of gloves, all I have to do is put them on.


 


Les Barrett Quality Construction

 

(post #122639, reply #14 of 46)

They are at the bottom of this page:


http://www.lfsinc.com/atlasgloves/BreathablePalmFitAtlasWorkGloves.htm


They're model 370 "nitrile tough."   They really are just a good as everyone is saying, especially when you need to work with small parts.

(post #122639, reply #15 of 46)

Ian,

Thanks for info.

Apparently, they don't sell direct to consumers; I emailed asking who sells them in my area. Do you have a favorite mail order source?

******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-2010

(post #122639, reply #16 of 46)

You should be able to find them at most feed and farm supplies.

I have yet to see a lumberyard without a display of them.

And they are also in big stores like Fred Meyers.

I get mine at the lumberyard or farm supply.



The person you offend today, may have been your best friend tomorrow

.

It's a small world. Until you have to walk home...

(post #122639, reply #17 of 46)

BTW: On my cardboard tag it says 370BK X-LARGE.



The person you offend today, may have been your best friend tomorrow

.

It's a small world. Until you have to walk home...

(post #122639, reply #18 of 46)

Yep -- that's the model # I wrote down (from the link).

Strange, I guess, but most of the yards I frequent have a very thin-to-none supply of non-building materials. I live in the middle of MSP, so there aren't any farm stores in the vicinity. I drink milk, though.

They're probably around here somewhere; I'll just have to start opening my eyes more.

thanks again.

******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-2010

(post #122639, reply #19 of 46)

If I recall correctly, the doctor I went to said it's not good to use cortisone-based creams any longer than necessary because it can actually make your skin thinner. 


I haven't used Cortaid so I can't say how well it works; the cortisone cream I had was by prescription, and I only used it until my hand was healed.


Now when my skin starts to get rough I use the Lac-Hydrin and they're healed in a day or two. 

 

 

(post #122639, reply #22 of 46)

Here they are.
http://www.wondergloves.com/prod01WG.htm

That quarter case price of $40 + 9 for shipping is better than I remember.
Only works out to $1.25/pair.
The full case works out to 94 cents /pair.

One of the best values I've ever seen in work wear.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #122639, reply #27 of 46)

Thanks a lot. When I did the Google search, this site must have been buried at the back of the line.

Ordinarily, I wear a large in gloves. but I assume you want these things to fit tight, so I will try the mediums. Does that seem right?

******************************************************** "It is what we learn after we think we know it all, that counts." John Wooden 1910-2010

(post #122639, reply #29 of 46)

I just read the label on mine. I normally wear a large glove in leather. These are large too and fit fine and snug with no slippage.

That rubber coating is labeled a Latex, so I guess that means for anyone allergic to latex, they should look elsewhere.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #122639, reply #44 of 46)

Those types of gloves are also great when you are working in a wood shop handling slipery sheet stock like MDF or melamine. You can push it across the table saw a lot easier.

(post #122639, reply #12 of 46)

During my time as a machinist we used to use a specialized tape.

Gloves were seen, rightly so, as a hazard as they could easily get caught and pull a hand into a machine. Also gloves, even the ones touted as allowing 'good dexterity' are pretty poor on this count when dealing with small parts.

The tape would be applied to the flats of the fingers, between the joints. The tight material didn't offer much chance of being caught. The tape wasn't very strong tensile wise and if a strip got caught it tore off easily. In this role they worked well in protecting the fingers from cuts and cuts from cutting oils and metal shavings.

Seeing as that you only mention a localized problem, your thumbs, this tape would seem to be a possible solution.

A lot of people mention skin drying. Used to get this a lot when I worked as a laborer pouring concrete by hand. A solution that worked for me was to get a pair of cheap cotton gloves. Leaving the job I would wash my hands and slather on a thick coat of Bag Balm or Corn Huskers lotion.I then put on the gloves for the drive home. By the time I got home the lotion had mostly been absorbed.

Seemed to help a lot.

(post #122639, reply #25 of 46)

Have you purchased any of the Plainsmen gloves lately? I loved them but Sams stopped selling them in Maine. Get them while you can.


t