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Bosch 4000 finish blade?

PeterJ's picture

Since I bought the 4000, I've been using the blade that came on the saw...40 tooth combo.  Not bad, really, but I'm thinking I need a finer blade for prefinished ply and melamine every once in a while. Local tool peddler is has Tenryu and CMT. The CMT he showed me actually says it's for a compound miter saw.


Did a little research and looks like blades for sliders and miters have less hook angle than similar "all purpose" blades. Not sure how that  would affect it on a tablesaw.


So here I am, asking for reccomedatiions on combo/finish blades. I'll use the stock blade for the rougher stuff. Thin kerf for sure, probably 50-60 tooth.


What are you using and liking?


PJ


Everything will be okay in the end.  If it's not okay, it's not the end. 

 

Everything will be okay in the end.  If it's not okay, it's not the end. 

(post #123688, reply #1 of 3)

http://www.1blades.com/products.ecs/list/130/1403/0/5/


FS Tool. Awesome table saw blades.


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(post #123688, reply #2 of 3)

Peter


Well God bless you for using that Bosch blade! I hate the one that came with my 4000.


I use a couple different ones, a Freud and Amana rip blade( I think about 20 teeth), a couple combo blades, one Freud and a Sawyer(50 tooth), and every once in a while a 60 tooth cross cutting Amana blade.


All work well as long as there sharp and I use the blade for its intended purpose.


Doug

(post #123688, reply #3 of 3)

Did a little research and looks like blades for sliders and miters have less hook angle than similar "all purpose" blades. Not sure how that would affect it on a tablesaw.

The hook angle is a safety feature. Using the wrong blade can cause problems.

SCMS blades have 0 or negative hook angle while table saw blades have positive hook angle.

Reason is that the table saw cuts down to the table. The positive hook angle on the teeth pulls the workpiece onto the table. A blade with 0 or negative hook angle is likely to try to lift the workpiece or throw it.

Chop saws or sliders, OTOH, work the other way, cutting UP from the table through the workpiece. A positive hook angle here will try to lift the workpiece off the table whilst a negative hook angle is more likely to keep the workpiece on the table.