Subscribe or Renew Membership Subscribe Renew

C-O-N-C-R-E-T-E

Lewis.Alison's picture

Hi, I have an inquiry to make about some construction I’m about to do on my house. I recently decided that it is time to renovate my home and among the things on my to-do list is setting up a floor heating in the living room and in the bathroom. I have read some stuff on the topic, but I would still like an expert opinion on how to do it in the best way possible. I am mainly wondering what material should I use to cover the heating pipes? I heard about his thing called screed but I am not sure what it is or is it any good.

Hi! I'm not an expert, but I (post #213853, reply #1 of 5)

Hi! I'm not an expert, but I finished my renovation last summer. I used Tube Pipe Insulation. 

Hey Tina (post #213853, reply #2 of 5)

he wants to heat his house with radiant hot water, you don't want to be insulating the pipe from the concrete.

 

And his cpl month old post rcvd no reply nor follow up by the original poster.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


It is not necessary to (post #213853, reply #3 of 5)

It is not necessary to completely isolate the pipe, they must always be available. Otherwise, one would be a water leak, and you have to break all.

Generally, an in-floor pipe (post #213853, reply #4 of 5)

Generally, an in-floor pipe array intended for floor-based radiant heating is covered with some sort of cement-based product (though I have seen mention of using a plywood "subfloor" above the pipes, with bits of lath between the pipes to keep the plywood from rubbing on the pipes).

I would assume that books and web sites on the topic would explain your options reasonably clearly.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

To give better suggestions, a (post #213853, reply #5 of 5)

To give better suggestions, a little more information is needed.

  • What is your current floor construction?  Slab on grade, or joists / subfloor / finish floor?
  • What is your curent heating system? 
  • Where are you located, and why do you want in floor heating?  To heat the house, or keep the floors warm to touch?