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Concrete Sealer Sprayer

JLazaro317's picture

Has anyone found a good sprayer for spraying concrete sealer. I currently use a "commercial grade" Hudson sprayer. I religiously clean it after every use with Xylene and I still have to put rebuild kits in the pump after every 3-4 uses. I was wondering if anyone makes a sealer can that I can hook compressed air to and forget the pump.


Thanks,


 


John


J.R. Lazaro Builders, Inc.


Indianapolis, In.


http://www.lazarobuilders.com

John

J.R. Lazaro Builders, Inc.

Indianapolis, In.

“You can either wait for the storm to pass, or you can learn to dance in the rain.”

"I'll be long gone before some smart person ever figures out what happened inside this Oval Office."—Washington, D.C., May 12, 2008

(post #120674, reply #1 of 12)

We roll it on flatwork as soon as it can be walked on, helps it stay moist for better cure time,  Are you talking about flat work or other?


                                               Miami

(post #120674, reply #2 of 12)

It is for flatwork. I currently spray the sealer on with a pump up sprayer. I like spraying over rolling. Our driveways are typically 1000-1400 sf. I was basically looking for a better sprayer alternative.


 


John


J.R. Lazaro Builders, Inc.


Indianapolis, In.


http://www.lazarobuilders.com

John

J.R. Lazaro Builders, Inc.

Indianapolis, In.

“You can either wait for the storm to pass, or you can learn to dance in the rain.”

"I'll be long gone before some smart person ever figures out what happened inside this Oval Office."—Washington, D.C., May 12, 2008

(post #120674, reply #3 of 12)

You might look at some of the smaller AG sprayers. The types used by landscapers. Some of them have battery powered pumps.

Northern Hydrayics used to have some, don't know if they still do or not.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe

(post #120674, reply #4 of 12)

Your best bet might be a cheap airless, next cheapest would be a pressure pot system. I suspect either of those will cost more than what you are using now, but they could be useful for other jobs.


I just wonder why you are cleaning with xylene, leaving the xylene in the sprayer is what is probably eating the seals. If you can't clean the sealer with a milder solvent, maybe you could just rinse with one after cleaning. If I leave a sprayer sit I clean with diesel.

(post #120674, reply #5 of 12)

I don't leave xylene in the sprayer because it will eat the seals. Diesel cleans up sealer in sprayers?


 


John


J.R. Lazaro Builders, Inc.


Indianapolis, In.


http://www.lazarobuilders.com

John

J.R. Lazaro Builders, Inc.

Indianapolis, In.

“You can either wait for the storm to pass, or you can learn to dance in the rain.”

"I'll be long gone before some smart person ever figures out what happened inside this Oval Office."—Washington, D.C., May 12, 2008

(post #120674, reply #6 of 12)

Then why are you rebuilding so often?  Even if you clean with xylene and empty the sprayer, the solvent needs to be neutralized to prevent further damage.


Diesel should clean the sealer you use, (but I don't know what product you are using), and is a heck of a lot cheaper than xylene. The benefit of diesel is that is is an oil, and safe for the various seals.


As for using a pump type sprayer, I don't see why you couldn't add a fitting to the tank to supply air, but you should add a pressure relief valve as well, and be able to regulate the compressor to the rated pressure of the tank, (whatever that is). Seems like a good idea that I haven't seen on small tanks, and you might even get rich off of it. You still have to hook up the comp and airline, but you don't have the fluid supply lines to clean like you would with other sprayers.


 

(post #120674, reply #8 of 12)

After I clean the sprayer, I leave it open overnight with the pump taken apart to dry out. I assumed that the xylene evaporated. I'l try the diesel for cleaning and see how it does.


I may try drilling and tapping a hole in the side of the steel tank and adding an air hose fitting. Then I could set the regulator on the compressor at about 20psi and inch my way up until I get the performance that I did with the hand pump. With the low regulated setting, I shouldn't have to worry about a pressure relief valve.


Thanks,


John


J.R. Lazaro Builders, Inc.


Indianapolis, In.


http://www.lazarobuilders.com

John

J.R. Lazaro Builders, Inc.

Indianapolis, In.

“You can either wait for the storm to pass, or you can learn to dance in the rain.”

"I'll be long gone before some smart person ever figures out what happened inside this Oval Office."—Washington, D.C., May 12, 2008

(post #120674, reply #7 of 12)

You might try the Q&A section of www.acid-stain.com

Sealers and equipment are always a topic of discussion there.

Paula, a.k.a. PDF from the old board.

I use a Chapin Extreme (post #120674, reply #9 of 12)

I use a Chapin Extreme concrete sprayer to apply my sealers. It is equipped with viton seals so  the xylene doesn't seem to affect them even though it's left to sit in the sprayer. I've had pretty good luck with this type of sprayers..

Two wild ideas .... 1) (post #120674, reply #10 of 12)

Two wild ideas ....

1) Wagner makes an $80 corded airless sprayer. HF sells a clone for half of that. Can't hurt to try them; and,

2) Xylene is very soluble in alcohol. After your xylene rinse, rinse it again with alcohol, the a final rinse with water.

I'm not sure I understand why (post #120674, reply #11 of 12)

I'm not sure I understand why you're cleaning your sprayer with xylene; your frequent rebuilds suggests you're killing the seals with your method.

I looked at the product data sheets for two Sherwin-Williams concrete sealing products - an oil-base and and a water base. The oil base says to clean up with mineral spirits, and the water base says to use soap and water.

Xylene has its' uses. An oily aromatic solvent, it is superb at dissolving wax. No concrete sealer should be based on wax, simply because wax breaks down quickly in sunlight. Xylene is hard on common nitrile rubbers, tending to 'dry' them out.

If you absolutely feel you must use xylene, flush it out afterwards with alcohol. Xylene is very soluble in alcohol.

Otherwise, I'd change my cleaning procedures.

I used a concrete countertop (post #120674, reply #12 of 12)

I used a concrete countertop sealer before and it really works out well.