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Custom Built Mitersaw stand

CarpenterJC's picture

I am in the process of building a mobile Mitersaw stand..I am looking for some ideas or better yet pictures of some you all have built..I am not real impressed with the commercial ones I have seen..something unique and mobile is what I am leaning towards..any ideas or photos would be great...


                                                                   JC

(post #121806, reply #1 of 17)

Don't kill yourself for nothing; the best mitre-saw stand I've ever used is an ordinary Black and Decker Workmate. Screw the saw to a piece of ¾ ply and screw a 2x2 lengthwise to the bottom of that, so the jaws of the workmate can grab it. Solid as a rock, plus you've got an auxiliary table/clamp/whatever on site if you need it. Hold up the long end of the board with a portable roller stand, or make a roller out of 2x4 and a closet pole, and clamp it in another workmate.


 


Dinosaur


'Y-a-tu de la justice dans ce maudit monde?


Dinosaur

How now, Mighty Sauron, that thou art not brought
low by this? For thine evil pales before that which
foolish men call Justice....

(post #121806, reply #2 of 17)

JC,


I wouldn't make one either and I make a lot of stuff.  I have the dewalt.  Love it.  $199 at hd.  If you make it yourself can you really beat that price or capability?  I got an extra pair of feet and attached a piece of countertop and edged it with pine.  Made a very nice auxiliary work table and coping platform for short trim pieces.


Rob Kress

(post #121806, reply #3 of 17)

Issue 65 page 46-47 has an interesting design for a roll around chop saw work station.


There is an article on different stands in issue 99  pgs. 44-49.


Then theres the ultimate workbench, issue 91 pages 63-65. This bench is a work of art .


ANDYSZ2



I MAY DISAGREE WITH WHAT YOUR SAYING BUT I WILL DEFEND TO THE DEATH YOUR RIGHT TO SAY IT.


Edited 12/28/2003 8:38:40 AM ET by ANDYSZ2


Edited 12/28/2003 8:54:18 AM ET by ANDYSZ2

WHY DO I HAVE TO EXPLAIN TO FRIENDS AND FAMILY THAT BEING A SOLE PROPRIETOR IS A REAL JOB?

REMODELER/PUNCHOUT SPECIALIST

 

(post #121806, reply #4 of 17)

I built the following table for my scm using 2 pieces 14" Trus-Joist with 1/2" top on them.  The pieces are 6' 4" long so they fit nicely in my F-150 with 6' 6"  box.  The main table is large enough because of the base config of the Hitachi.  The tables make for a long work surface so I can cut base, crown etc easily without the cut end falling all over the place.  The stands collapse so all is quite moveable and all fits in the truck for transport to new job.  If I'm at a job for a period of time I can screw the works together for a real solid work station.  At night I just take my scm and leave the tables.  By the way there are blocks on the center table that fit the base of the scm so it is always in the same spot on the table.  I think it is a good system for my work (trim carpenter) and it is mobile without too much grunt work (I'm basically lazy!!)

My DW says I'm a tool head with a sawdust brain !!

First we get good- then we get fast !

(post #121806, reply #5 of 17)

I like the simplicity of the small table with wings but the carrying the saw back and forth can catch up with you. I like the delta stand because i can wheel it around it folds up nicely and has good support wings.


Has anybody made improvements to there stands I would like to see them?


ANDYSZ2 


I MAY DISAGREE WITH WHAT YOUR SAYING BUT I WILL DEFEND TO THE DEATH YOUR RIGHT TO SAY IT.

WHY DO I HAVE TO EXPLAIN TO FRIENDS AND FAMILY THAT BEING A SOLE PROPRIETOR IS A REAL JOB?

REMODELER/PUNCHOUT SPECIALIST

 

(post #121806, reply #6 of 17)

Ya, the delta stand has the stuff but needs to be upgraded a step with it's hardware.


I mean I've dragged that stand up/down hills and steps and tho' it's there in durability it doesn't give you the assurance that it's tough.


I've been thinking of going thru it and adding some strength.


 


 


 


 

 

(post #121806, reply #7 of 17)

My handle bolt is broke off and now the handle is bent so i am going to beef that up. I think i will put some pipe insulation at the bottom  shafts to keep the support stands from sliding into the wheels.I marked the supports so that when I set up I can put them at the right height every time.


ANDYSZ2


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


I MAY DISAGREE WITH WHAT YOUR SAYING BUT I WILL DEFEND TO THE DEATH YOUR RIGHT TO SAY IT.

WHY DO I HAVE TO EXPLAIN TO FRIENDS AND FAMILY THAT BEING A SOLE PROPRIETOR IS A REAL JOB?

REMODELER/PUNCHOUT SPECIALIST

 

(post #121806, reply #8 of 17)

<to keep the support stands from sliding into the wheels>


yep, that's the voice of experience talking. Roar!


<I marked the supports so that when I set up I can put them at the right height every time.>


Ya know I tried to do that and ended up with abunch of lines on the stem. I think that the unlevel flooring and the tension on the legs changes the ability of preset for me since I always have to end up fine tuning anyhow.


You make a little catch table on the left under the extension piece? Handy for tapes and pencils.


Been thinking of putting an outlet strip on the stand somewhere.


Before I load it to the truck I like to invert the shopvac and blow the snot out of the saw.


 

 


 


 


 

 

(post #121806, reply #9 of 17)

I do a lot of crown, and I like a continuous material support on both sides.


I Like to be able to fasten a crown support to the base for cutting crown that will fit upright.


Boss got the trac-rac stand .....CRAP, over priced, supports don't stay where you want, no way to fasten stops or such.


We also have a Stablemate that I built plywood wings for one 8' one 4'


Saw should come of and on easy for transport.


Mr T


Do not try this at home!


I am an Experienced Professional!

. .

(post #121806, reply #10 of 17)

Hey tickyboy, I like your setup!   It's a good workable table that breaks down easily and quickly and as you said goes into the truck without too much of a fight. I think I'm gonna have to copy your design for my next saw table. (you're not gonna charge me a design fee are ya?)   The one I have now is a 16' 2x12 with a 1x8 raised surface blocked up to the height of the saw, a space in the middle with a piece of plywood screwed to it for the saw to sit on.  It works pretty well, but really puts up a fight during transport and setup, especially in tight areas.


 I too like to have a nice "table" as a work surface, something that most of the store bought saw stands do not have.

(post #121806, reply #17 of 17)

YOu're lucky I'm in the Christmas spirit today-  no charge for the design. (LOL) I use the tables everyday that I work.  One other advantage that I forgot to mention is that I often will put a bundle of baseboard (or crown, casing ) on the horses that jut inside of the tables making it easy to grab the next piece to cut. (it's right there in front of you)  I also like the solid portion of the table because I often use a stop block to precut my "legs" of casing (for doors) all to 1 length which I can do on either side of the saw.   If I were doing it again I might be tempted to use the 12" TJI for the table (I'm constantly trying to lighten my load !!) but I picked up the 14" at a reduced price at the yard because it was weathered (belt sander fixed that!!)


Anyway- good luck and any questions you can e-mail me.


Joe


 


My DW says I'm a tool head with a sawdust brain !!

First we get good- then we get fast !

(post #121806, reply #11 of 17)

Hey CarpenterJC,


I built two, one out of aluminum and one steel and they both got ripped off with all the rest of my tools couple of years back when they ripped off my truck and cut and sawed all the chains and cables off and left truck abanded with smashed up steering wheel column.


Since then I came up with another one. This one also works great. I rescued it out of a dumpster on a job site. Some building maintenance people had tossed an old steel cart. The frame and two steel shelves were still in good shape but wheels were shot. I had a full set of locking 5" swivel casters, and mounted those, then added more bolts to  tighten it up. Looks like hell, but just right for me. Fits through doors real good. Added MDF board to top to mount 12" miter saw. Bottom shelf big enough to hold Dewalt/Emlo compressor and guns, and spare tools. Add bucket of tools on top shelf to saw, toss on tool belt, stack extension cords, and air hoses on top, then stack 2 folding adjustable material support stands on top of all of this. Stuff lunch box down below, lock van, set alarm, and just walk away with all the tools and equipment I need for the job. No more multiple trips to van to set up.


I've seen lots of folding work stands with wheels that work great but none of them carry all the rest of your equipment and tools.


The "looks like hell, dumpster diving cart", is the way to go.


Cork in Chicago 

(post #121806, reply #12 of 17)

hey j;


if your taking your saw to the job just build one there.  its cheaper than buying one. when your done with the job just throw it away and build a better one for the next job.  it gets better as you go along.

(post #121806, reply #13 of 17)

Carp.... we had all kinds of jury rigged  chop say stands..


 then i saw Pro-Decks Dewalt.. went right out and bought one.. best i've seen. carry it in one hand.. rock solid.. stops... extends  right and left..


 easy set-up...


 do yourself a favor.. save your creativity for something else.. get the Dewalt


Mike Smith   Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith   Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

(post #121806, reply #14 of 17)

carp.. this is the DW....

Mike Smith   Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith   Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

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(post #121806, reply #15 of 17)

hey mike my brother in-law has the same stand but different saw,(dw 12" double bevel sliding compound mitre) but a pain to put in the truck every day. lots of thieves around here.  build your own and just take the saw home

(post #121806, reply #16 of 17)

I have the dewalt as well. One of their better tools. It always seems when whatever i've got has wheels, the path is too muddy/rutted/snowy/tight/has steps, or whatever, to roll it, and I end up carrying it anyway! So the DW works out well. You can make neat "wings" with backs for extended support if you need them, and get even more utility out of it.


 


I like the flip up stops.  Very versatile.


I actually have two, and mounted my DW 13" planer to the second with in/out feed surfaces I made that rest on the extentions,  for doing long thick sticks alone without sniping.


Rated for some ridiculous weight as well.


Jake Gulick


Lateapex911@optonline.net


CarriageHouse Design


Black Rock, CT

Jake Gulick

Lateapex911@optonline.net

CarriageHouse Design

Black Rock, CT