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Cutting FRP panels??

JeffHeath's picture

Hi, Folks.  I'm over from the Knots, and have a question.  I am doing a repair job at a restaurant that involves FRP panels, and I need to know what you fine folks who work with this stuff use to cut the panels.  I was told at the supplier to use a fine tooth blade.  I have the Festool plungesaw and CT-33 vac, and want to use that to keep the fiberglass dust down to a minimum, as they will be cut in the restaurant during off hours.  Can I just use the 46 tooth woodcutting carbide blade, or do I need something special?  Any help is greatly appreciated.


Jeff

(post #127225, reply #1 of 21)

are the panels preglued to osb or are you just cutting the thin ones?

October 17th, 2009


Jeremy and Lisa


Was there ever any doubt?

Wedding has been moved to November 14th. 

Doing a small ceramony now, big party in the spring!

(post #127225, reply #5 of 21)

I'm using the thin sheets, which I will apply after I re-install the 5/8th drywall.  This is in a restaurant, where a sprinkler system pipe burst, with some major water damage.  I removed all old drywall, which was covered with the FRP.  The sprinkler system company is doing the repairs to the broken pipes, and I'll be taking it from there.  The repair area is a wall, with a soffet above, so I have plenty of cuts to make.


Thanks for the help.  My guess is that the Festool saw and guide will help me get a nice, straight cut, and the vacuum attachment always provides pretty good dust control.  I'll definately be wearing my respirator for this one.


Jeff

(post #127225, reply #6 of 21)

Leave your saw in the truck....... use tin snips. Malco makes some snips for vinyl siding that works great for FRP


 


edit to add.


Edges are never exposed (covered with J, corner or splice trim) so perfect edges need not apply.


Edited 1/27/2009 4:02 pm ET by Boats234

(post #127225, reply #7 of 21)

docking shears. get them at harbor freight if you don't want to spend much.

"this dog may be old but he ain't cold. And he still knows how to bury a bone."


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"this dog may be old but he ain't cold. And he still knows how to bury a bone."

Lattimore

 

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(post #127225, reply #11 of 21)

I use my vinyl tin snips and my shear that goes in the cordless drill.


Make sure you mud the drywall or the seams will show through.


Drill bits and tin snips for small holes.


 


October 17th, 2009


Jeremy and Lisa


Was there ever any doubt?

Wedding has been moved to November 14th. 

Doing a small ceramony now, big party in the spring!

(post #127225, reply #12 of 21)

Thanks to all for the fine tips.  I have metal shears (from building my shop), grinder w/cutting disc, and the saw option.  I'll just experiment and see which works best.  I believe that since the job is only 10 minutes from my shop, I'm going to take all the measurements, and pre-cut the panels in my shop, where I'm set up for dust extraction.


Thanks again.


Jeff

(post #127225, reply #13 of 21)

I used to build bathroom buildings in a shop, then ship em out on a truck.  We would build the walls on a table, sheet'em plywood, then roll out the frp onto the sheeting, (preglue the panel).  Once the FRP was down, we would trim the edges and openings with a router, using the panel as a guide.  I can't remember if it was a bearing guided bit, or just a panel pilot bit.  But it worked slicker than snot. 


 

(post #127225, reply #15 of 21)

That's a great tip for new construction.  Unfortunately, the walls I'm working on are already up.  Thanks, though.


Jeff

(post #127225, reply #16 of 21)

I use a scoring blade and snap if not doing too much. By far the cleanest.

For those who have fought for it Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

For those who have fought for it Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

(post #127225, reply #17 of 21)

Score the back and snap, or a thin kerf CT blade 24tooth plus.

(post #127225, reply #19 of 21)

I score the back, no way would have considered scoring across the pebble grain face. 


http://www.stanleytools.com/default.asp?CATEGORY=SPECIALTY+KNIFE+BLADES&TYPE=PRODUCT&PARTNUMBER=11-942&SDesc=Scoring+Knife+Blade


Not sure what blade you are talking about for the saw.  A lot of dust unless you have geat DC.


For those who have fought for it Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
For those who have fought for it Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

(post #127225, reply #14 of 21)

Installed lots of this. Jigsaw , wood blade, beltsand if needed. Controls dust, less noise. Cuts a little slower, but you feel better at the end of the day

(post #127225, reply #2 of 21)

Use a steel plywood blade.Keeping down the dust is pretty much impossible. I used a 6" PC sawboss that has a bent pipe chute for dust contol. All it does is direct the dust in the direction you want. I tried a bag but it fills too fast and just clogs up. Maybe a vaccumn hose may work if it doesn't get in the way.What I wound up doing was vaccumning after each couple of cuts.


mike


Edited 1/27/2009 2:41 pm ET by mike4244

(post #127225, reply #3 of 21)

Aren't you limited to the propriatary blades ? Use the one with the most teeth.

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Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations


 


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(post #127225, reply #4 of 21)

I don't do much with FRP, but when I have I use a steel plywood blade - installed reverse in a circular saw. Has always worked for me with no chipping.


 


Shawn


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Checker Contracting - SE Michigan

Shawn

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Checker Contracting - SE Michigan

(post #127225, reply #8 of 21)

These are what I use for the occasional FRP install. There is no dus, ,cuts are accurate, the moldings allow a good fudge factor. Snap a line and go for it.
http://www.amazon.com/Factory-Reconditioned-Milwaukee-6852-80-Gauge-Shear/dp/B000SE6RP0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=hiqid=1233096803&sr=8-2

"Shawdow boxing the appoclipse and wandering the land"
Wier/Barlow
"Shawdow boxing the appoclipse and wandering the land" Wier/Barlow

(post #127225, reply #9 of 21)

we've always used shears with great results.


 


ML

(post #127225, reply #10 of 21)

We use a slitting wheel(cutting disk) on a grinder, someone holding the shop vac hose near the cut.

(post #127225, reply #18 of 21)

For straight cuts and no dust: USE STEEL CUTTING SHEARS!

Don't take the plastic sheet off before you cut. The static charge of the plastic will catch a great deal, especially if you can charge it up a little more by rubbing it on on any of these: Note, some work better than others!


TRIBOELECTRIC SERIES


your hand
glass
your hair
nylon
wool
fur
silk
paper
cotton
hard rubber
polyester
polyvinylchloride plastic

 

You can mark on it with a Sharpie on the finished side as long as the protective plastic stays on.  This works great when marking for sink drains and supplies. I use a fiber-reinforced cutoff wheel on my dremel for contour cuts. You aren't just stuck with orange peal for a finish either, they make bead board FRP panels now too! 

 

(post #127225, reply #20 of 21)

For cutting FRP i use a nibbler. This is fast and very litttle dust.


Smaller cuts tin snips or large snips.


 

CUTTING TOOL (post #127225, reply #21 of 21)

JEFF

 

I found the best tool to cut FRP, it an electric metal cutting sheers, i got the tool at Harbor Freight Tools for $45 bucks and it smooth, no worry about fiberglass in the air, great for cutting holes n outlets, the only draw back is that you loose 1/4 of material?  no big deal?

 

Vinny