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Door maker's vice / bench

Huck's picture

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7QT6PbQ1dc


I was introduced to this vintage video here at BreakTime.  In the part about millwork (4:51 - 4:58) there is footage of a really cool door vise.  I would love to make something like this, can't think of the number of times I could have used one.  Anyone have any insight into making one of these?


(post #127670, reply #1 of 13)

I bet Dino could come up with a modern version.

"Put your creed in your deed."   Emerson


"When asked if you can do something, tell'em "Why certainly I can", then get busy and find a way to do it."  T. Roosevelt

"Put your creed in your deed."   Emerson

"When asked if you can do something, tell'em "Why certainly I can", then get busy and find a way to do it."  T. Roosevelt

(post #127670, reply #2 of 13)

I noticed that fixture in that video as well.  Strange as it sounds I watch & rewatch that vid on an almost regular basis (that & the 3 Stooges).  The fixture doesn't look that difficult to build but it seems we're missing the critical view and that's the far side where the guy is doing soemthing with his foot.  Most of what I see there should be off-the-shelf stuff. 

(post #127670, reply #3 of 13)

I have an antique book press that looks similar to the screw vise on the end.  On the side, there are two screw vices that seem to operate simultaneously.  That thing looks like it could exert some monster torque - which is what is needed to pull together a large unit like a door or gate.  I have, in a moment of rising panic, when clamps failed me as my glue dried inexorably, been known to pick up my project and slam it on the concrete, which tends to drive it together efficiently, even if being somewhat hard on the edges.  That door vice just looks so much more sophisticated!


Edited 8/3/2009 10:13 pm by Huck

(post #127670, reply #4 of 13)

for the screws my bet is you cna find them (Acme) at McMaster Car, probably the handles as well.  Synch the 2 side handles with a bicycle chain & sprocket.  Getting a flat bed to mount it all on is the trick and key to success. 


Do you see the guy doing something with his foot?  What's that doing?

(post #127670, reply #5 of 13)

"for the screws my bet is you cna find them (Acme) at McMaster Car,"


Or Lee Valley, which are probably cheaper ($32 for the screw, $5.80 for the handle):



 


Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

(post #127670, reply #9 of 13)

I'll see what I can find at mcmaster tonight but I'll be looking for the individual pieces to build up and add sprockets to synch the side clamps.  Not sure how easily sprockets can be added to the Lee Valley Acme screw. 

(post #127670, reply #6 of 13)

I'm betting he's pumping a hydraulic jack or a ratchet doo dad for side ways clamping, while the tail screw does the end clamps.


There are tables with grid holes that small air jacks fir into for squaring up face frames, usually on a tilt against the wall. Set the air clamps in the right holes, lay in the frame parts and step on the switch...all the clamps acuate at once and square it up, then ya pin the tennons.  30 second job.


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations


"If Brains was lard, you couldn't grease much of a pan"
Jed Clampitt



www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #127670, reply #7 of 13)

I just saw this infomercial for what's called, "Jawhorse."  Made by Rockwell.


Looks like it's about perfect for holding up a door.  One of their skits showed it holding a vertical post in place while the hole was backfilled.


http://www.rockwelltoolsdirect.com/jawhorse.html


 


Edited 8/4/2009 7:54 am by peteshlagor

(post #127670, reply #10 of 13)

Saw that too..I don't have the $$$ or room for anything else, I spent most of the day yesterday finding the floor in my shop and every flat surface becomes a saw horse or bench, I'm pathetic.

Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations


"If Brains was lard, you couldn't grease much of a pan"
Jed Clampitt



www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #127670, reply #8 of 13)

I've used the clamp up tables for RP doors but the piston aren't strong enough, I'd think, to do what is needed for large, full sized doors.  Maybe the ones I was using were worn out too, dunno, but I still don't think those little psitons would have enough force to work well. 

(post #127670, reply #11 of 13)

Coulda been weak , I liked air asst. hydraulics.


In guitar work, we did a LOT with vacuume jigs, man I got hooked on the possibilties.


Natch, everything has to fit right, clamps that are forced means something ain't right and needs investigation.  I've bulled stuff that was fighting and wind up with a bigger problem most of the time.


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


Repairs, Remodeling, Restorations


"If Brains was lard, you couldn't grease much of a pan"
Jed Clampitt



www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #127670, reply #12 of 13)

believe it or not, we did a lot of vacuum bagging on aircraft sheetmetal and now the composite repairs are nearly all vac bagged.  But i'm still doubtful of those little pistons, even brand new, having enough umph to push a door together. 


Another possibilty I thought of on that table is that the force doesn't come from the screw jacks at all and comes from whatever he's pumping to push the straight edge opposite of the screw jacks. 


where's an old timer when you need one? 

Hi.  I just saw your post (post #127670, reply #13 of 13)

Hi.  I just saw your post even though it is several years old.  I have actually worked with one of these door clamps, in fact I think it is still at Boise Moulding in Boise, Idaho. The step pedal is no more than a ratcheted gear that pulls the two sides together fir clamping. Only if your tenons/dowels/copes are VERY loose do you have enough push to actually squeeze it together for a proper joint. It might work if it had hydraulics, as it is (was) it was worth only about what you could get for scrap metal.

Thanks for letting me spew.