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Extension ladder weight

DanH's picture

I've got a Werner 28-foot type I aluminum extension ladder, and, with my post-polio and this bad arm it's getting to be too much for me to handle.  I bought it when we resided the house 18-20 years ago, but I now use it only about once a year to clean out the high gutters.  The house is a "split entry", so the roof edge (2-foot overhang) is about 15 feet above "ground level", but on the north side the ground slopes away by about 2 feet before you're out the roughly 6 feet to the point where the ladder base must rest.  (It's always "fun" on that side -- have to set up a piece of plywood with a cleat to hold the ladder base.)  But this is probably too much information.

I'm planning to go up the north side one more time on that ladder, and will measure while I have it up to see what length I really need.  Then I'm hoping that a 24-foot ladder will turn out to be sufficient.  If so, I'd plan to buy a new ladder.

I weigh in at 230 bare naked at the gym in the morning.  A new 24-foot type I would save me close to 10 pounds from what I can figure (the current ladder weighs in at 47 pounds), while a 24-foot type II would shave off about 17 pounds.

So -- What are the arguments for picking one or the other (or is there a 3rd option)?  (I do kinda like having the stiffer ladder, but I can get used to a bouncier one, I suppose.)

(BTW, I installed screens over the south side gutter today, and plan to do the same on the north side in stages, but I'll still need to get up there on occasion.)


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

How about this for a 3rd (post #203496, reply #1 of 21)

How about this for a 3rd option:

Intall a tie offs on the roof, and put in an attic "hatch" so you can access the roof deck without a ladder.  No more difficult than doing a skylight, especially if it's high on the roof.

YAY!  I love WYSISYG editing!  And Spellcheck!

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A hatch would be exceedingly (post #203496, reply #4 of 21)

A hatch would be exceedingly impractical to install and use.  I could get up on the roof from the other side fairly easily, but I'm deathly afraid of getting near the edge of the roof -- I could probably manage with  the right harness, but the mere thought of laying head down on the edge of the roof scares the bejesus out of me.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Paul's idea sounds (post #203496, reply #2 of 21)

Paul's idea sounds interesting.


Otherwise it sounds like you're on the right track. I've got a type 2 which is OK for me. Mind you I'm 155 lbs. soaking wet. Have you considered a fiberglass ladder? (I don't know if they're heavier or lighter.)

I seem to remember you've got kids (boys?). Maybe it's time for them to get involved. My kids LOVE the thrill of getting up on a ladder.

My 33 year old son would (post #203496, reply #3 of 21)

My 33 year old son would drive down from St Paul if I asked him, but it's not terribly convenient for either of us.

From looking at the Werner web site it appears that fiberglass is heavier than aluminum, for the same size ladder.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

For rare use (post #203496, reply #5 of 21)

I would buy the lightest ladder of the shortest length that will reach. As you know all the specs are on Werner site. I'd wager that there is a 50-100% safety factor built into the weight limits they publish. You are not going to break a 200# or 225# rated ladder unless you carry a massive glulam on your shoulder and then start jumping around.

I have a 28' Werner 300# fiberglass ladder and it's quite unwieldly. I can raise it alone, but I don't know if I could do a 32'.

I guess another (post #203496, reply #6 of 21)

option is a Telesteps or Extend-n-climb ladder. Not sure if they make one that reaches your gutter. Very easy to carry around...

Those ladders top out at (post #203496, reply #7 of 21)

Those ladders top out at about 15 feet, and if one were made to reach 20 feet it looks like it would be over 40 pounds.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

busting a gut (post #203496, reply #8 of 21)

Dan,


At the risk of offering a rather demoralizing suggestion... what about hiring a big, strong kid to help you wrestle that thing around?  I weigh in at 130 and I'm pushing 60.  So when I encounter a sack of cement that needs lifting or some other not-so-smart thing to lug, if there's no wheel to somehow help me out I try to calculate what's left on my medical insurance deductible and weigh it against what It would cost to have someone help.  I'm not always so disciplined about this and I have an upcoming hernia operation in September to prove it.  I hate reality as much as the next guy... but sometimes you just have to defer to it.

One problem is that most of (post #203496, reply #9 of 21)

One problem is that most of the guys on the block are older than I am, and all the kids have flown the nest.

But, yes, if it gets much worse I'll hire a handyman to take care of stuff like this.  It's just that I know they won't do as good a job.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

The type II or III is more stable (post #203496, reply #10 of 21)

It sounds like you are uncomfortable at heights. 

Remember that the higher the load rating on the ladder, the stiffer it is, and thus not a bouncy. 

Remember that the higher the (post #203496, reply #12 of 21)

Remember that the higher the load rating on the ladder, the stiffer it is, and thus not a bouncy.

Yes, that's a tradeoff I'll need to consider.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

What is the actual length (post #203496, reply #11 of 21)

What is the actual length ladder you need?  I had a 40' aluminum extension ladder and one section got used for something other that a ladder . . . which left me with a nice light 20' ladder.  I find it useful for lots of stuff.  Would something like that fit the situation?

What is the actual length (post #203496, reply #13 of 21)

What is the actual length ladder you need?

I plan to measure it when I get up on the north side.  I originally bought the 28 because it could reach the highest part of the house, back when we were residing.  I no longer feel the need to, eg, reach the fascia at the peak of the gable end.  (Which is to say if work is needed there it either gets hired out or I rent scaffolding.)


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Try Refit My home. We have (post #203496, reply #14 of 21)

Try Refit My home. We have more tools there.

Visit my website about laminated [url=http://refitmyhome.com/kitchen-worktops/]kitchen worktops[/url].

Hey buddy. (post #203496, reply #15 of 21)

Didn't look like you had any tools on that website-

Spam as far as I can see-you care to reply?

 

 

NOTE:  Do not even go to REFITMYHOME-this squirrel dog probably gets a quarter every time someone hits on it.

[JOBSITE WORD] them

and [JOBSITE WORD] him.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Hahahaha... Calvin the Spam (post #203496, reply #16 of 21)

Hahahaha... Calvin the Spam Slayer, aka "Squirrel Dog Slayer".

http://refitmyhome.com = spam spam spam spam

James, you are a brainless spammer replying to threads that have no relevance to your (so called) business.

Send corrective comments to:

sales@refitmyhome.com
 

Scott (post #203496, reply #17 of 21)

Do you think those people ever see the light of day?

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


>>>Do you think those people (post #203496, reply #18 of 21)

>>>Do you think those people ever see the light of day?

Nope. And the website is one of those cheesy boilerplate concoctions that is like a pox spreading over the web.

Oh well, move on...

You know what? (post #203496, reply #19 of 21)

If they were handy on site repair, maybe we could enlist their services to fix this stuff that's been suggested for well over a yr and a half.  As it is, I think any plea in Forum Suggestions is not even getting read much less instituted.  Perhaps Dan Morrison has even been deep sixed, unlike his to not respond in some way.

 

It's just a damn shame.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Yup. Two tune titles that (post #203496, reply #20 of 21)

Yup.

Two tune titles that typify my feelings about this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSqCkDgI8...

and

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxwvOncHVbQ

Extension Ladder weight (post #203496, reply #21 of 21)

Instead of buying a new ladder why don't you just cut the 28 footer to the length you want.  I had a similar situation...my roofer told me to buy a 36 footer, which I did.  It was never fun to move around by myself but it got to the point where I no longer wanted to use it.  I took out the jig and recip saws and cut it down....even reinstalled the plastic ends.  It's now a 30 footer and much more manageable.  Would this option work for you?