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Fence for Multimaster?

DanH's picture

Has anyone seen such a thing?  I'm thinking of situation where you need a clean, square (or perhaps beveled) cut, and relying on a steady hand is not sufficient.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Since the tool doesn't spin, (post #206231, reply #1 of 10)

Since the tool doesn't spin, it only oscillates, it's pretty easy just to line it up and hold it steady, it doesn't jump around. You can use the same techniques you might use with a hand saw or chisel. Score a line with a knife and under cut it to form a small V for the blade to register in. There is often a waste side when using the tool, so a wood guide could be attached to the waste to act as a straight edge guide. It's an unusual tool as is somewhat limited in what you might cut with it. Is there a particular application you have encountered where you have trouble keeping it straight? I'm not envisioning a situation where the tool wants to wander or a fence might be needed or usable but that doesn't mean there isn't one.

Beat it to fit / Paint it to match

I was just thinking of an (post #206231, reply #2 of 10)

I was just thinking of an application where you might want to maintain, say, a 25-degree bevel angle.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Hammer is right. (post #206231, reply #3 of 10)

Over the years using the MM for a whole variety of cuts, the only "fence' I've used has been the flooring when undercutting casings etc.

But, if you could affix a 25 deg block to whatever you are cutting, you could use it to "guide" a free hand cut.

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I cannot think of ANY (post #206231, reply #4 of 10)

I cannot think of ANY situation where even my spastic hands would need a guide of any sort for a multimaster.

My uses for the Multimaster (post #206231, reply #5 of 10)

My uses for the Multimaster are generally on materials that are fixed in place. Whether that is cutting a baseboard to install a cabinet or rasping out old grout. It's uses are similar to what I would have done with a chisel before I had the tool. One of the most common things I use the MM for are trimming off shim shingles when hanging doors. It doesn't matter how thick the shims are, it walks right through them with no pounding, breaking or slip of a knife. If a material is free to take in hand, then carrying it to a saw of some type is usually easier and more accurate. I wouldn't use the Multimaster to cut a piece of baseboard that I could take to my miter saw, for example. A fence attached to the tool, such as you might attach a rip fence to a circular saw works in situations where the work is free. We often use fences or guides on the work to guide various tools. I think that would be more appropriate in Multimaster use, particularly since a fence on the tool wouldn't be useful until the blade was taken to depth.

Recently there was a post where the person had rotted post coverings. I could see trying to cut those in place and adding a bevel to fit new pieces to and eliminate water infitration such as you could have in a straight 90 degree cut. In a case like that, a beveled guide could be used with the MM to facilitate a consistent cut. A fence on the tool wouldn't be of much use.

I try to be cautious when going by my own limited experiences. There are always situations that I may not think of or have had need for. Fein and others have added a lot of blades and other accessories for the MM since I first bought mine. They even have a depth stop now but I haven't seen a fence. If there are uses for one, it probably won't be long before they are available. Maybe one with a sliding feature that allows guiding the blade as it enter to depth. For now, I could accomplish that with a guide block in any situations I may encounter.

Beat it to fit / Paint it to match

I was thinking more of a (post #206231, reply #6 of 10)

I was thinking more of a guide than a conventional fence, I suppose.  Particularly given the odd angle you need to hold the MM at to use it, it's not always easy to eyeball how square you are to the workpiece, etc.  And if you need to make a bevel cut that's even harder.

Just thinking out loud, though, not really any immediate need.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Dan (post #206231, reply #7 of 10)

Really, free handing with a guide line (knife or pencil) for square and a good eye or perhaps a beveled block to serve as something to parallel from-all you need.

or, find a different tool or remove the pc.

 

Making finished cuts with the MM is something that can be done free hand.

Don't know about the knock off brands.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Dan, I use guides all the (post #206231, reply #9 of 10)

Dan, I use guides all the time. My Fein burnt up it's 2nd switch, so I now use a couple of Okays... Harbor Freight 20 buck knockoffs. I can get 3 for less than a replacement switch.

Anyway, for something like cutting a bevel when cutting out a piece of rotten corner board, we just cut a bevel on a 2x, fasten it to the waste piece, and cut away. It's not a perfect cut, but it's a lot better than me free handing.

When I do a set of stairs, I usually have to cut back the flooring for the nosing. Getting a straight, clean 3 1/3 foot cut right up to a wall is a pretty long challenge for me without a guide.

Cutting base in place for a new cabinet is easy if I just hold a square something against it, and run the blade along that.

We just found 2 more uses for the things last week when we put on a new porch roof. Cutting shingles to a line, both on cut valleys and overhangs. A worn out blade works great if you don't have a slicer... plus it will cut thru flashing. That gave us the idea to try to cut the gutters and downspouts. I'll never use a hacksaw for that again!

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We'll have a kid Or maybe we'll rent one He's got to be straight We don't want a bent one He'll drink his baby brew From a big brass cup Someday he may be president If things loosen up

I waited 10 threads to see if (post #206231, reply #8 of 10)

I waited 10 threads to see if anyone else would say this..

 

Most pawn shops dont find it worth the risk to fence Feins anymore after the $20 HF models hit the market!

There's a reason they don't (post #206231, reply #10 of 10)

There's a reason they don't let you live in town!

 

:)

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