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Festool TS55 Work w/ Pergo?

10saw's picture

Hi

I've been eyeing that Festool TS 55 or 75 for a while and may have a use for it.

I have a job that will include laying down about 1600 sqft of Pergo and building some cabinets on site. Tons of crazy angles greater than 45° and plenty of rips as well.

But the kicker would be it's performance with Pergo. And will it's blade hold up or should I get one for the job and keep a nice sharp spare for finer work?

Thanx,
10saw

(post #124843, reply #1 of 97)

Not to hijack but have you considered:


www.eurekazone.com?


That's the route I went vs the Festool and couldn't be happier (as well as many others here)


PaulB

(post #124843, reply #2 of 97)

Thanks,

What appeals to me about the Fedstool is the non skid bottom which I can just slap on a line and cut without fooling with clamps. Does the EZ Guide work as fast? Looks like a clamp-on affair.

The plunge cut of the saw not to be underestimated either,

I've yet to find a portable tablesaw that I like so the price not a huge deal, I'd rather have the Festool than a Bosch TS at this point.

10saw

(post #124843, reply #3 of 97)

The SmartGuide has many advantages.  I'll grant you that the Festool saw has great dust collection but I have 2 Smart Guide systems with PC saws and they are awesome... peruse the website and check it out.


www.eurekazone.com


Lemme know if I can answer anything.


PaulB

(post #124843, reply #9 of 97)

What appeals to me about the Fedstool is the non skid bottom which I can just slap on a line and cut without fooling with clamps. Does the EZ Guide work as fast? Looks like a clamp-on affair.


How about taking a look at this.


http://www.eurekazone.com/products/detail/nst.html


 


The plunge cut of the saw not to be underestimated either, or overestimated.  While I enjoy the feature at times, I more often find it a pain and find myself using the Festool saw only for special cuts.   I don't enjoy holding down the plunge while I make all of the cuts.  It limits how far I can reach.  And worse yet it csan and occasionally does jump (that is why the saw now comes with one stop.)


 


I've yet to find a portable tablesaw that I like so the price not a huge deal, I'd rather have the Festool than a Bosch TS at this point.


Cutting narrow strips with the festool rail system is a problem.  Only the EZ Smart provides the means for repeatability with the repeaters and the means to hold small pieces with the smart clamping system.Here is another Link.


http://eurekazone.com/gallery/smart-clamping-tutorials


 


 


 


Edited 11/15/2006 1:11 pm ET by Burts


Edited 11/15/2006 1:15 pm ET by Burts

(post #124843, reply #11 of 97)

what problems have you had cutting narrow strips with a Festool?


Maybe more time consuming to do multiple thin rips as the Festool does not have a repeater system as the ez, but I've had no problems cutting small strips with the Festool.


I personally don't mind the plunge feature, as for limiting the reach, I'd say if you are not able to hold the saw head down you're over extended and have lost control and grip on the saw.


Team Logo

(post #124843, reply #12 of 97)

what problems have you had cutting narrow strips with a Festool?


Maybe more time consuming to do multiple thin rips as the Festool does not have a repeater system as the ez, but I've had no problems cutting small strips with the Festool.


I agree with your comments about the repeater making repeat cuts easier.  Also the capabilities of the smart clamping system make it possible to hold and rip a piece of wood as thin as 1/4".   


As you say a festool saw can make the same cuts but it takes making special jigs and more time to do the task.


I personally don't mind the plunge feature, as for limiting the reach, I'd say if you are not able to hold the saw head down you're over extended and have lost control and grip on the saw


Again, I understand your statement and agree  with most of it.   I just prefer a saw that I can crosscut a 4' sheet with.   Also,  I don't like the way the saw can jump.  I've heard that referred to "as the rite of initiation into the world of Festool."  That is where the mark on a lot of Festool rails comes from.

(post #124843, reply #13 of 97)

Cutting small rips with your Festool is quite easy. Just today I ripped some extenison jambs that went from 3/32 to about 1/2" over about 81"

Festool is a complete system right down to the way you carry it around. It's not just an edge guide that uses sticky tape to hold your after market saw to a plastic base.

(post #124843, reply #16 of 97)

OK/.


the question  here is:


how do you hold (clamp) a narrow piece of wood and not


how  you cut strips from a larger piece.


Can you clamp and cut a cabinet filler???   3" wide?


From 2-1/2" to 2-1/4"?


Show me how you can do that with the festool system.

(post #124843, reply #17 of 97)

YES YOU CAN would you like a video?


I've done it and it's not terribly difficult, set the filler on my made up "bench" of plywood or on the last job and old door slab.  Put the filler on it, set another filler or other scrap of 3/4" next to it so you can support the opposite side of the guide rail, line up your filler with the guide rail and cut away.  I suppose if you really wanted to clamp it down you could at that point.


Either way it's not impossible and the easy smart is not the end all be all god's gift to carpenters tool, and neither is the festool.  From what I've heard they are both good systems, owning the Festool I have a bias, but I've heard the EZ is a good system too, only different.  Each has capabilities the other doesn't.


This whole EZ/Festool "debate/argument" is getting old and I can't believe the ferocity that the EZ supporters go through, what's with the extra tall letters anyway?


Chill out people it's a freaking tool, you people make it out like someone is insulting your mother when the festool is suggested over the ez guide.


 


 


Team Logo

(post #124843, reply #22 of 97)

 


...what's with the extra tall letters anyway?


 

I've done it and it's not terribly difficult, set the filler on my made up "bench" of plywood or on the last job and old door slab.  Put the filler on it, set another filler or other scrap of 3/4" next to it so you can support the opposite side of the guide rail, line up your filler with the guide rail and cut away.  I suppose if you really wanted to clamp it down you could at that point.


not terribly difficult ... .


find a bench or an old door....find another filler of same thickneess... to support the other side.... find another scrap to support both the filler and the s.crap...and find another scrap to clamp the firstr scrap and the filler. Then you can ..cut away.


Either way it's not impossible ....


Nothing is impossible.


This cut was done without scraps, old doors or tablesaw.


 


 


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david


 


 


 


 


 

(post #124843, reply #23 of 97)

And what Davidwood didn't show you is that when you clamp the piece in and turn the rail over, the clamps form feet to support the rail so you can do the cut on the top of a marble counter top and not damage anything - No need for benches or scraps.

(post #124843, reply #29 of 97)

Burt,

I hope you are feeling much better nowadays.

Having said that, You have continuosly dogged everyone everywhere on the EZ gaget(Just like Dino). I'm happy you like/love it and there is never a reason not to say so, but like CAG said you think it's the end all to all things and it's not.

One of the simplest reasons a bought the Festool and not the EZ was that I was able to see the tool in action in real time. I was able to see just how long it took and how easy and safe the tool was to use.

Dino has no such video to view and I wonder why that is. It looks to me that the EZ takes some time to "setup" and to use with all it's componets and attachments.

Within 3 mins of taking my TS55 out of its case the first time I was using it.

(post #124843, reply #33 of 97)

Joe, 


Over the past few months, Dino has added several short video's.  He has also shot a longer video that  should be out any day.  I'm in total agreement that the video's are helpful.  DIno is also in the process or remodeling the web site. 


Enjoy!


Burt


 

(post #124843, reply #37 of 97)

Dino has no such video to view and I wonder why that is.


 


cabinetmaker


cabinetmaker take two 010
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cabinetmaker 2


cabinetmaker take two 017
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the SRK


Rout EZ flutes.



transpixel

transpixel  the repeaters.


Even thru the knots.
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enjoy.


david.


Edited 11/17/2006 10:20 pm ET by davidwood

(post #124843, reply #30 of 97)

"the clamps form feet to support the rail so you can do the cut on the top of a marble counter top and not damage anything - No need for benches."


No offense Burts, but this is probably the worst piece of advice I've read in a long time. Using someone's countertop or floor as a workstation is begging for trouble. Not using a secure and stable workbench - whether it's Festool or EZ - is irresponsible, people get hurt that way.


Seems we've lost sight of the OP's question - Yes, the Festool will work with Pergo.


-Norm


 

(post #124843, reply #31 of 97)

The EZ is interesting, but since I have a bunch of guys using my tools, safety is a big concern, and I really like the plunge feature of the festool saw.

From what I can tell, the EZ Guide is a bit more useful than the festool setup--being able to clamp small pieces to the rail is pretty slick. That said, I've never had any particular problem doing that w/ my festool.

We do a fair amount of punch work in high-end occupied apartments, so the dust collection/storage advantage of the festool system was a tipping point for me. I also like the simplicity of the rail--there ain't a whole lot to cypher about how it works w/ the saw.

(post #124843, reply #32 of 97)

The comment about being able to safely cut on a marble counter top was in no way meant to suggest that anyone do that. It was meant to show the cut could be safely made on any surface.


And I also agree that the Festool could cut pergo and from what I've heard of pergo, I also think the purchase of an extra blade would be wise.


Burt

(post #124843, reply #25 of 97)

well isn't that just spec asz tacular...


I could give a ####.


and by the way, I don't have to "find" a scrap, or a door and I don't bother clamping it.  The bench is set up as a work table, so it's always there, the scrap or other filler is more then likely with in arms reach... It doesn't take any longer for me to make a single thin strip then it takes you to do the same.


 



Team Logo


Edited 11/16/2006 10:34 pm ET by CAGIV

(post #124843, reply #39 of 97)

That's a hell of a tooth pick. EZ tools are prob good for make'n 'em

(post #124843, reply #24 of 97)

I've noticed that in these discussions of Festool vs EZ Smart, almost without exception, Festool supporters come up with remarks like yours here about "chilling out" while the EZ Folks just keep on talking about tools.  

(post #124843, reply #26 of 97)

no, Burt, you don't keep talking about tools, you keep pushing ONE tool, the EZ, and grant it, it may be a fine tool but it's not the ONLY tool.


Nobody supporting the EZ answered the guy's question, you guys just jump in start talking about how great the EZ is.  Which is fair, up to a point, but let it go after you tell him about it, there is no reason to keep pushing and pushing.


It get's old.


I'll apologize now, I'm in a piss asz mood and the constant EZ cheerleading irritates me


Team Logo

(post #124843, reply #27 of 97)

I think Burt is repping EZ...


Dino's helper or partner maybe..


 


 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!


Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #124843, reply #28 of 97)

Let me explain   a little of my enthusiasm for the EZ Smart.  First of all I'm a full time woodworker primarily because I enjoy woodworking.


In March 2004, I had prostate cancer and had the prostate removed.  In July 2005, I developed an incesional hernia along with a groin hernia and had that repaired.  In December of 2005,  I had open heart surgery - 4 by passes plus a valve repair.  All of this led me to look for an easier way of doing things.  Following the heart surgery, I could handle a circular saw before I could move a sheet of plywood.  My employee would put the sheet of plywood on the table and and I could make it into cabinet parts. 


I own both Festool and EZ Smart equipment.  I find that I like the EZ Smart equipment better.  The use of the EZ equipment allows me to do far more than I would be capable of doing with conventional woodworking equipment.  The ease of use of the EZ equipment helps to over come my physical limitations.


 

(post #124843, reply #51 of 97)

And the winner is...drum roll...envelope please..

I bought the Festool!

Frankly mostly based upon availability as a dealer is nearby. I love the idea of no clamps and plunge cuts.

I'm sure the EZ is a fine tool and am willing to bet one could not determine which was used on a project but my decision was the Festool.

Thanks all,

oh yea I guess I'm a Festool guy now so uhhh.......

chillout <G>

10saw

(post #124843, reply #18 of 97)

Wow!

Thanks all!

BTW if I had to cut a 2 1/2" board to 2 1/4" with a Festool I'd just slap along side another peice of stock the same thickness but wider as a platform to use the rail system and have at it. This illustrates the appeal of the Festool to me; it takes a downward pressure to plunge the saw and hold the stock.

But I've not used one yet just seen others use it.

Of course for a scribe strip like that I use a TS or a planer to get it just right.

Lot's of ways to skin a cat. I like to have good tools that I can depend upon.

Thanks again,

10saw

(post #124843, reply #20 of 97)

David,

What's with the Big letters? Are you trying to compansate for the lack of something?

With the use of some simple aids, pieces of 3/4", 8" wide 48" and 96" long, I can cut anything with my Festool easily and safe. I use one great saw and different sized rails.

Burt,

Since your Festools are not doing it for you I'd be happly to take them off your hands.


Edited 11/15/2006 11:07 pm ET by Joe

(post #124843, reply #21 of 97)

Joe,


I didn't say that the Festool equipment is useless.  I just said that overall it isn't my favorite.  There are those places where it performs well.  I don't use it often but as a full time wood worker, I'm in no rush to get rid of it.   Occasionally it is the perfect tool for a task.  In my "buffett" of circular saws, it has it's place. 


 

(post #124843, reply #14 of 97)

The EZ guide has a "process" of how you go about "attaching" the strips to their guide. You can read about the "downside" to using it here. http://www.eurekazone.com/products/detail/nst.html

(post #124843, reply #52 of 97)

I've cut laminate with the stock blade that comes with the 55 and I'm a diehard Festool fan.

However, with laminate floors you lay them so the cut ends are against the wall.
Rarely you will need to join cut ends.
This means any decent saw can be used for shortening a board.

usually an entire floor can be laid with only factory edges joining.

(post #124843, reply #4 of 97)

With out turning this into yet another debate of the Easy Smart vs Festool I'll say I love my Festool TS 55. 


They do make a speacial blade for laminate flooring


http://www.festoolusa.com/ProductDetails.aspx?ProdID=489457&ID=3


The plunge cut is a great feature in my opinion.


I'd suggest buying an additional guide rail and the connectors as well as the clamps.  They're not "necessary" but they are nice to have.


I'm sure quite a few EZ guide folks will be along in a short while to tell you how great the system is.


Team Logo