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Framing Gun - Corded or Not Corded That IS the Question

Stan's picture

Although I have seen a couple of posts similar, I am going to ask this anyway.

 
I do handyman work and do not need a framing nailer all that often...but also believe in purchasing the best tool for what I can afford...even if it means saving up for it.
 
Recently I have seen that Bostisch recently came out with a new model LPF33PT Low Profile Paper Tape Framing Nailer.  I liked the reviews because it was light and can get in between studs.  It is corded.
 
Then today I noticed that Paslode has come out with a Li-ion Cordless Framing Nailer...the CF325Li.  This gun is $81.00 more than the Bostisch...but...look ma' no compressor.
 
Can any of you veteran's out there give me some direction?  I am not in a hurry to make a purchase...just doing my due diligence before I do.
 
Thanks!!! 

"Projects beget projects and projects beget the need to buy new tools and that is what the cycle of life is all about."

The thing I would worry about (post #207049, reply #1 of 7)

The thing I would worry about is the LiIon battery loosing 40% usefullness in 2 years... and you not using the gun enough to justify spending $120 for a new battery.

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paul does make a good point (post #207049, reply #2 of 7)

paul does make a good point regarding the battery.  i own both, i have corded framing nailers and cordless.  it all boils down to how much you're going to use them.  i use my corded nailer, obviously, for the larger jobs but then i just love being able to grab the cordless gun for alot of the small jobs i do also.  the more i think about it the more i'm leaning towards the cordless because of the time and aggravation it saves.  i do use me cordless gun several times a week, even if it's for a shot or two and i can't imagine setting up the compressor that often.  it would definitely slow me down.

 

So, after 2 years or so, you (post #207049, reply #3 of 7)

So, after 2 years or so, you are HOSED!

Wow... if that comment get's (post #207049, reply #4 of 7)

Wow... if that comment get's published in the magazine, even I might cancal my subscription.

 

;)

YAY!  I love WYSISYG editing!  And Spellcheck!

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Heh Heh... (post #207049, reply #5 of 7)

Heh Heh...

Stan, I''ve been involved (post #207049, reply #6 of 7)

Stan,

I''ve been involved in all phases of residential remodeling for almost 30 years now. Most of our work is custom and I'm moving in and out of framing and finish stages daily.  I have found that fastening guns have become so wonderfully specialized that it pays to own a large variety of them. I own multiples of  framing, finish, narrow, medium & wide crown staplers, flooring, plasti-cap, brad, micro pinners, etc. guns-- and all allow you to be very productive...and very precise.

In order to be able to use any one of them (or swap out easily) I find corded the way to go; it's just so universal. I dont want to have to worry about propietary batteries, charge levels, or fuel cells. Been there, done that. My paslodes sit mostly dormant in the shop now. I  just need to remember which ones need to be oiled and which don't (now I slap a label  right on the tool as a reminder).  I always have my 1 HP Thomas (love it--super light ,super quite, and less than 15 amp draw) and a 30' light weight poly air hose in my van.  It will run any gun for any small job. Sure, I have heavy compressors and air hoses for production framing and trim; but at least with the Thomas at hand (and the guns I need with me) I know I am always operational in a pinch. It is no hassel at all to set this small rig up anywhere as long as you have a 15 amp circuit available.

FWIW, I say go corded.

Cheers!

William

There is no real substitute (post #207049, reply #7 of 7)

There is no real substitute for air. Once you get used to air tools and get the compressor you will cut the cord forever.

There are dozens of cool air tools from nailers to impact wrenches to paint sprayers. Once you separate the motor from the tool they also get cheaper and safer. Nobody ever got electricuted by an air tool.

Greg