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Framing Nailers--Paper or Plastic

TJW's picture

I expect to have to build a deck and possibly a shop when I move in the next year or so and because I have to replace a porch on my current house I thought I'd get a framing nailer now.  I am considering one of the Bostitch framers that has an attachment to allow it to handle metal connector nails in addition to the normal framing nails.  They offer two versions: one that uses 33-degree, paper-collated nails and one that uses 22-degree, plastic-collated nails.  Question one: is there an advantage to one method of collation over the other?  I've read that the plastic ones sometimes suffer from flagging, i.e. leaving pieces of plastic stuck under the nail-head.  This would be a problem on visible surfaces, such as railings and decking, wouldn't it?   How big of a problem?  On the other hand, plastic-collated nails seem to be more readily available in the local big boxes.   Question two: is one angle significantly better than the other?   Thanks.


Tom

(post #125647, reply #1 of 10)

Welcome to Breaktime!  You've been lurking a long time.


I cannot speak to the Bostich nailer or the viability of the metal connector nailing attachment as I have no direct experience.


I have a Hitachi framer and a Bostich palm nailer which I use for the metal connectors.


Your questions: paper vs plastic collation - I think only clipped head nails use paper collation (and some Paslode "RoundDrive"?), full round head nails use plastic. The collation techniques doesn't really matter. Paper is more compact. So the nail head style becomes the real issue - full round heads can be used anywhere, clipped head use is restricted in some building codes. My opinion is that exposed clipped head nails look nasty - deck and rail consideration for you.


flagging - yes it is unsightly on an exposed surface. The plastic can usually be removed from a "just set flush" nail with fingers, knife point, or needle nose pliers. Not a big deal.


>> plastic-collated nails seem to be more readily available << - this is probably the most important consideration for you - the nailer won't help much if you cannot get the nails you need.


Collation angle - no big difference as far as I know. 33 degree collation will mount the nail magazine to the nailer at a sharper angle which would allow the nailer to get into a tighter opening.  Hitachi is 22 degree and usually will fit where it is needed - if not I use the palm nailer or a hammer for those few places the nailer won't fit.


Others will chime in soon.


Jim


Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.


Edited 7/19/2007 7:39 am ET by JTC1

Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.

(post #125647, reply #2 of 10)

Ease of picking up the fasteners locally is a major deciding factor. I've never had any problems with any collation method, just problems picking up nails. It's a royal pain to have to order online when they have cartons of nails in the local stores that are fine, but they won't fit your gun.


Oh, now that I think of it, there is one collation issue that I've dealt with. Plastic collated coil nails for my Max tend to pop out of the plastic "belt" if you don't handle them with extreme care in storage and loading -- causes feeding to come to an abrupt halt until you remove the offending section. Minor issue, but an issue just the same.


Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA

Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

(post #125647, reply #5 of 10)

Hartman Independent Co. on Mayview Road probably sells the nails you need since they are a large Nail supplier and also a Max Dealer. 

(post #125647, reply #6 of 10)

VERY cool. Thanks! Never used them, but I'll look 'em up. (They are nearby, too.)


Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA

Mike Hennessy
Pittsburgh, PA
Everything fits, until you put glue on it.

(post #125647, reply #7 of 10)

All:


Thanks for the info.  I think plastic wins out.  If flagging isn't so bad I can live with it, and nail availability is important.   Regarding round vs. clipped heads, both the Bostitch's I'm looking at, the F21PL and the F33PT, use round-head nails.  The F21PL uses plastic and the F33PT uses paper.  Thanks again.


Tom

(post #125647, reply #10 of 10)

I was wondering what you was talking about becuase I had only heard
about the N88RH

http://www.bostitch.com/default.asp?CATEGORY=BOS%5FFRAM%5FNAILER&TYPE=PRODUCT&PARTNUMBER=N88RH-2MCN&SDesc=Industrial+Round+Head+Framing+System

But it looks like they have come out with two new ones.

http://www.bostitch.com/default.asp?CATEGORY=BOS_FRAM_NAILER&TYPE=PRODUCT&PARTNUMBER=F21PL&SDesc=21%26%23176%3B+Industrial+Framing+Nailer+System
http://www.bostitch.com/default.asp?CATEGORY=BOS_NEW_PRODUCTS&TYPE=PRODUCT&PARTNUMBER=F33PT&SDesc=Paper+Tape+Framing+Nailer

.
.
A-holes. Hey every group has to have one. And I have been elected to be the one. I should make that my tagline.
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe

(post #125647, reply #3 of 10)

Call the local building inspector and ask if they allow clipped head framing nails.  Regardless of what people say about holding power and such, it's his call.  Some places require full head nails, and that might sway your decision.

"Put your creed in your deed."   Emerson


"When asked if you can do something, tell'em "Why certainly I can", then get busy and find a way to do it."  T. Roosevelt

"Put your creed in your deed."   Emerson

"When asked if you can do something, tell'em "Why certainly I can", then get busy and find a way to do it."  T. Roosevelt

(post #125647, reply #4 of 10)

the little plastic pieces will shoot all over when using plastic collated nails.  Especially in tight quarters.

(post #125647, reply #8 of 10)

If you get plastic be sure and wear eye protection. I have a bostitch and will sting ya pretty good with a stray chunk of plastic every once in awhile

(post #125647, reply #9 of 10)

Craig:


That's good info to know. Thanks, I'll remember do that.


Tom