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"hoseless" finish nail guns

cwc09's picture

Anyone have any reviews for cordless nail guns, framing or finish? Getting pretty damn sick of lugging around the compressor and hoses. I think its time to break down and get my self one.


I'm shopping for a finish gun now and a framing gun down the line sometime.


Any insight would be appreicated. thanks

(post #126620, reply #1 of 20)

I like my Paslodes.  I have one trim gun and a couple of framers.  Sometimes, rarely actually, they are a little more fussy than pneumatics but the convenience of not needing a compressor and not having to haul hose all over the place far exceeds the occasional maintenance needs. 

(post #126620, reply #2 of 20)

I really like my DeWalt finish nailer.  Works on the same battery platform as my other cordless tools and has served me well over the past two years.


My only real complaint is the rubber "foot" often falls off.  The gun works just as well without it but you run the risk of marring the finish.


But a great gun especially for what I paid for it.

(post #126620, reply #3 of 20)

A little background first.


If your using these guns all day long you might be better off keeping the air guns.


I have Paslode finish(16g & 18g) and the framing guns.


I use the finish guns a lot at work and they do a great job for me, I do this stuff all day long and the guns can handle it. I also have air guns as well cause there are times when I'm working with others so the air guns just seam to work out better.


I don't do any framing, or very little, so the Paslode framer is more then adequate for me but I doubt a real framer would like them, not fast enough, cant bump fire them........


What are you going to use them for?


Doug


 


 

(post #126620, reply #4 of 20)

Good point Doug.  Yeah, if you are running trim for 10 hours a day in new homes or running them in a cabinet shop, stick with the hose models.


But if you are like me and do an occassional kitchen trim out or crown molding install than the cordless is the way to go.

(post #126620, reply #5 of 20)

I couldn't do any fine kitchen work without my 23 ga pinner, so I might as well keep a coompressor and hose around for the other guns.

I did buy the Kobalt Co2 kit but haven't used it enough to guage it's usefulness.
(bought the small tanks - too small to last very long, now have some larger tanks, but haven't filled them yet to test.

JT

(post #126620, reply #6 of 20)

I'm mostly looking for a finish nailer for small remodel jobs. I usually work in all phases of the remodel from demo to finish so I wouldn't be using it all day everyday. Most of the houses around me are 900 - 1500 sq ft rowhouses so my finish jobs are pretty small.


I've got my eye on the paslodes. Any complaints or comments on them?

(post #126620, reply #8 of 20)

The Paslode finish guns are fine! I have the old black one and the newer orange model. They also have an angled and a small pinner that I don't have.

only comments are study the book and learn how to clean it. Most guys I know who've had trouble with them clean it never or very rarely.

Good to have an extra battery , but not too many extra fuel cartridges - there is a shelf life on them.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #126620, reply #9 of 20)

Paslode makes a cordless pinner?  I would be very interested if they did since I already have the 16 and 18 gauge finish nailers and I've been very happy with them.  They don't list a cordless pinner on their website.

(post #126620, reply #10 of 20)

I think Piffin's talking about the 18 ga. brad nailer.


Unless Paslode makes products for use just in Maine.

(post #126620, reply #11 of 20)

yeah

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #126620, reply #12 of 20)

Thanks, Shep.  And thanks for your support in the other thread about walking off of a job.


Hijack alert...


Tomorrow I'm driving up to Sparta to do some repairs on a customer's vacation cabin.  I haven't even seen what needs to be done, but they trust me to do what's right and charge fairly.  I have lots of great customers like this and I look forward to working for them.

(post #126620, reply #13 of 20)

That's great! I have customers like that. Some of them I barely see- they're off to work before I get there, and don't get home 'til after I leave for the day.

(post #126620, reply #20 of 20)

You guys are so lucky ... I know it's not luck but a lot of people bust butt to end up w/ clientelle like that and can't quite get there. It's HARD WORK establishing and maintaining that client base ... good hard work, but hard nonetheless. I envy you.

There ain't NO free lunch. Not no how, not no where!

(post #126620, reply #7 of 20)

"I also have air guns as well cause there are times when I'm working with others so the air guns just seam to work out better."

LOL, like when you have your face near the floor, doing baseboard, and you like the taste of sheet rock dust?
my guys have always gravitated from their Senco pnuematics to my Paslodes

your Q about how he will use them is good though. The Paslode framer will not be a good choice for production framing on new work, but back up framing and remo work are good places for it.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #126620, reply #14 of 20)

If you are using it for everyday fraing a paslode framer might not be the right tool as it is more finicky than pneumatic nailers.  However, for limited framing or small-scale nailing needs it is a fantastic tool.


 




 


I refuse to accept that there are limitations to what we can accomplish.        Pete Draganic

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I refuse to accept that there are limitations to what we can accomplish.        Pete Draganic

 

(post #126620, reply #15 of 20)

the biggest drawback to the framer compared to pnuematics is not the finicky. It is just too slow for production work

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #126620, reply #16 of 20)

Yeah... but it is slow because it is finicky.



 


I refuse to accept that there are limitations to what we can accomplish.        Pete Draganic

<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> 

I refuse to accept that there are limitations to what we can accomplish.        Pete Draganic

 

(post #126620, reply #17 of 20)

No, it is slow because of the way it is designed to work. minimum of two separate mechanical functions per shot, and add the fan cycling. Even if you nail as fast as you can work the mechanics, after a bit you come to a point where you have to wait for the fan to clear the exhaust. I came to realize that there is a reason the nail sticks and magazine are so short - to force you to re-load while it cools and cycles.

They are right up front about it in the advertising and the owners manual, explaining that you cannot fire this type gun as fast as a pnuematic.

By contast, with a pnuematic you can bump-fire all day long as fast as you can move the tip

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #126620, reply #18 of 20)

yeh and it is fun!(to nail as fast as you can)

(post #126620, reply #19 of 20)

minimum of two separate mechanical functions per shot, and add the fan cycling. Even if you nail as fast as you can work the mechanics, after a bit you come to a point where you have to wait for the fan to clear the exhaust.


Like I said... finicky.  sheesh.




 


I refuse to accept that there are limitations to what we can accomplish.        Pete Draganic

<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> 

I refuse to accept that there are limitations to what we can accomplish.        Pete Draganic