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Sawhorses, how tall?

JohnT8's picture

Title just about says it all.  I realize people's heights vary.  The question is geared towards what height do you want your sawhorses at?


Knee high, waist high, chest high?  (or somewhere in between).


 


jt8


There is no revenge so complete as forgiveness. -- Josh Billings 

jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #122885, reply #1 of 53)

WRIST WITH ARMS AT MY SIDES... OR 38"


proud member of the FOR/FOS club...


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #122885, reply #2 of 53)

how tall are you ??


Mine are 30" I think.


I cant imagine trying to use a portable table saw on a set of horse 38" high!


Eric


I Love A Hand That Meets My Own,


With A Hold That Causes Some Sensation.

 

 

"When the spirits are low, when the day appears dark, when work becomes monotonous, when hope hardly seems worth having, just mount a bicycle and go out for a spin down the road, without thought on anything but the ride you are taking." — Sherlock Holmes, 1896

(post #122885, reply #14 of 53)

tall and very long arms..


proud member of the FOR/FOS club...


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #122885, reply #3 of 53)

I have several sets. They range in height from 24" to 36".


Cutting is usually done on the 32" ones.


James DuHamel

He who dies with the most toys.... Still dies!


"For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his soul?" MARK 8:36


www.godsfreemusic.com

James DuHamel

He who dies with the most toys.... Still dies!

"For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his soul?" MARK 8:36

www.godsfreemusic.com

(post #122885, reply #4 of 53)

put your thumb in the middle of your lower back and that is the height your work bench and saw hores should be -- all the best - Dudldy

(post #122885, reply #5 of 53)

I was taught that workbench height is the height at which your arm is fully dropped but your hand is held horizontal from the wrist, your palm would be resting on the bench top.  It works well for me.


I have horses ranging from 18" on up to 36".  It depends on what you're doing.

(post #122885, reply #6 of 53)

I was taught it should be something else that rests horizontal on the bench if the height is correct but I realise it's a case of "Other countries, other ways"!

(post #122885, reply #8 of 53)

If we're talking shop here it depends on if you can even get whatever it is of yours to "rest" while it's horizontal.  With me it's never at rest when it's horizontal, and only part of the time when even I'm horizontal, at which time I suppose it would be plumb or in that ballpark.  It is then that the bench is at the perfect height for working on your wood.

(post #122885, reply #10 of 53)

take off the high heels? yer calfs are sweet without the CFM boots..Gunner said so.

 


Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Woodworks


" Let behind the eyes, that which one talks"

Rumi....

www.richmondrenovationsandrestoration.com  

(post #122885, reply #17 of 53)

say what..


you makin' a pass at me...



proud member of the FOR/FOS club...


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #122885, reply #18 of 53)

Don't mean to bud in here but does anyone have plans for a good pair of knock down saw horses? Saw the article in the last issue but those were permanent.


 

(post #122885, reply #21 of 53)

available at Menards for something just under $20 each



Edited 1/29/2005 3:57 am ET by Shoeman

(post #122885, reply #15 of 53)

works out to 38" fer me...


proud member of the FOR/FOS club...


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #122885, reply #7 of 53)

I bought a pair of the new Stanley FatMax sawhorses.


Each leg is adjustable.  I have not used them too much but so far I like them.


-Mark


 

 

(post #122885, reply #9 of 53)

It depends what you use them for.

I have a set that are about 20-22". They work fine fro cielings and crowns with a plank running across them. I can also load them with half a bunk of lumber to cut for use...

i also made up a set of four at 36" high to do a special cieling job and they became my sopecial horses. But I later cut them down to about 30 or 32". Work height is comfortable at 36" but set up a chop saw on them and then the working height is suddenly more like 40". Same if you pile material on them or plop a TS across them.

A general rule is that for tedious work, like tying flies or trim cutting, you want the wiork surface higher, butfor haevier work like kneading bread dough, you want it lower. Bakers tables are usually 28 - 30"

All this depends on you and your height, of course.

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
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Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #122885, reply #16 of 53)

OUCH!!!!


back breakers..



proud member of the FOR/FOS club...


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #122885, reply #19 of 53)

Those of mine you were cutting over were the 32" ones, with the workstation, probably up to about 36" or so.

I assume your ouch was for the 22" ones, but add a half bunk of 2x4's or plywood to them and you are still cutting starting out at around 38"

 

 


Welcome to the
Taunton University of
Knowledge FHB Campus at Breaktime.
 where ...
Excellence is its own reward!

 

 

Oh Well,

We did the best we could...

(post #122885, reply #20 of 53)

I thought I had used the 32's and I thought them to be a mite short...



proud member of the FOR/FOS club...


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!!   What a Ride!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #122885, reply #11 of 53)

Think mine are in the 36-38 range, but then again im 6'6".

(post #122885, reply #12 of 53)

I want to be able to put my knee on the material to hold it, and be able to reach across a 4x8 sheet without climbing up on the sheet. 24" is good for me. I also like the legs to splay out wide 20°, so if I hit them when loading, they don't tip over.

Beat it to fit / Paint it to match

Beat it to fit / Paint it to match

(post #122885, reply #13 of 53)

John , Ive heard and been a part of big arguements over this issue. I dont know if it will ever be settled. I put it in the same category with relegion and politics.


Tim Mooney

 

(post #122885, reply #22 of 53)

Ok, here's a question...

Sawhorse leg... 70 degree cut at the top, 20 degree at the bottom.

What length do I cut the long side to, to obtain 34 inches height when the top of the leg is at the top of the sawhorse ?



The person you offend today, may have been your best friend tomorrow

.

It's a small world. Until you have to walk home...

(post #122885, reply #23 of 53)

Sawhorse leg... 70 degree cut at the top, 20 degree at the bottom.


What length do I cut the long side to, to obtain 34 inches height when the top of the leg is at the top of the sawhorse ?


Ahhh, the things that people think of at 2AM... I think Luka was having a geometry or trig flashback.



jt8


Our lives improve only when we take chances -- and the first and most difficult risk we can take is to be honest with ourselves. -- Walter Anderson


Edited 2/2/2005 9:50 am ET by JohnT8

jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #122885, reply #25 of 53)

So you don't know the answer either ?

;)



The person you offend today, may have been your best friend tomorrow

.

It's a small world. Until you have to walk home...

(post #122885, reply #27 of 53)

Well I assume your angle from ground to bottom of the leg isn't 20 degrees, cuz that would about 3X as long as tall.  :)

jt8


Our lives improve only when we take chances -- and the first and most difficult risk we can take is to be honest with ourselves. -- Walter Anderson

jt8

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
-- Carl Sandburg

(post #122885, reply #24 of 53)

36-3/16"

(post #122885, reply #26 of 53)

You formed a right angle triangle ?

My head hurts thinking even that much about math right now. Let alone 2 inna am...



The person you offend today, may have been your best friend tomorrow

.

It's a small world. Until you have to walk home...

(post #122885, reply #28 of 53)

>> You formed a right angle triangle?

Yep. I couldn't figure out exactly what you meant by the cutting angles, so I made the same assumption as JohnT8, that you wanted the leg at a 20 degree angle from the vertical or 70 degrees from the horizontal. So the right triangle has a vertical side of 34", your specified height, an undetermined horizontal side, and a hypotenuse of the length of the leg, a 20 degree angle at the top, and a 70 degree angle at the base. The 34" vertical side is adjacent to the 20 degree angle at the top. The cosine of an angle is equal to the adjacent side divided by the hypotenuse. So the equation is:

cos (20) = 0.93692621 = 34 / length of leg (ridiculous number of digits indicates use of calculator)

Rearrange the terms and you get:

length of leg = 34 / 0.93692621 = 36.18204426 =~ 36.1875

Of course that's just the mathematical length. Depending on the actual shape of the leg, you might have to start with a slightly longer board to get the right result.

That also only accounts for the splay in one dimension. If you want the legs to splay 20 degrees in both dimensions, the leg needs to be 39-3/4". [Edit: should be 38-1/4.] Again, that's only the wireframe length. An actual leg with actual width and thickness may need to be a little longer, depending on how you cut it.


Edited 2/2/2005 6:15 pm ET by Uncle Dunc

(post #122885, reply #29 of 53)

ROFLOL

Ouch, my brain hurts.

Simple...

Sawhorse leg. 2x4 (Ok, technically what is it now ? 1.5x2.75 ???)

70 degree cut at the top, so it goes up against the cross member of the sawhorse, and sticks out at an angle.

20 degree cut on the bottom in the opposite direction so the leg sits fairly even on the ground.

Here, I drew a purty pitchure...

Yeesh, I coulda already cut one er a couple a hunnert, and figured it out by now.

;)



The person you offend today, may have been your best friend tomorrow

.

It's a small world. Until you have to walk home...

(post #122885, reply #30 of 53)

Luka,

It's just like cutting a rafter. Your top cut is 70°. So that's like saying your rafter would have a 33/12 pitch.

With your 34" height that you want with a Construction Master you can do this.

70 [Pitch]

34" [Rise]

Press [Diag] Returns = 36-3/16" (Length of Horse Leg)

Press [Run] Returns = 12-3/8"

View your Horse leg as a rafter and the 2x4 you nail it into is the ridge. Your top plumbcut cut would be cut at 70° and the bottom level cut would be cut at 20° as you have in your drawing.

It's nothing but a Triangle a Run, Rise and Hypontenuse.

I guess I look at everything as if they were rafters and I'm just crazy...........

Joe Carola
Joe Carola