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Skil saw dado kit

hughmus's picture

I saw this saw in Larry Haun's Efficient Framing book and was wondering if anyone has used one of these saws. The look like they cut the birds mouths fast. If i were to get one of these, is there anything important to know about using it... Safety for one.

(post #126308, reply #1 of 67)

Is this what you are talking about?


 



 


 


Gord


                        


 


 

 

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(post #126308, reply #2 of 67)

Man... that looks like something from "Texas Skilsaw Massacre, Pt. V".


I'll take a pass.


 


PaulB


 

(post #126308, reply #4 of 67)

DW called it the "Freddy Kruger Saw"

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)


                        


 


 

 

(post #126308, reply #12 of 67)

'nuff injuries for a while eh?


 


 

 

"When the spirits are low, when the day appears dark, when work becomes monotonous, when hope hardly seems worth having, just mount a bicycle and go out for a spin down the road, without thought on anything but the ride you are taking." — Sherlock Holmes, 1896

(post #126308, reply #13 of 67)

Pretty soon I'm going to start going to work in medieval chainmail armor...

PaulB


 

(post #126308, reply #3 of 67)

scary

 


"I never met a man who didn't owe somebody something."

 

"I never met a man who didn't owe somebody something."

(post #126308, reply #5 of 67)

A fella could have a lot of fun with the new guy and that saw.

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)


                        


 


 

 

(post #126308, reply #15 of 67)

what??? you don't like the new guy????

 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #126308, reply #16 of 67)

Just because I want to scare the #### out of the new guy doesn't mean I don't like him, his new truck, 20 yr old gf, and his full head of hair.


All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)


                        


 


 

 

(post #126308, reply #17 of 67)

a new truck and that full head of hair is pushing the limits...

 


Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming


WOW!!! What a Ride!
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!

"Some days it's just not worth chewing through the restraints"

(post #126308, reply #9 of 67)

Who needs that when you could have this?


(post #126308, reply #7 of 67)

Yeah, thats the one... I recently bought a used one online. I hear that they've been taken off the market. Its a product of Pairis Enterprises. I've googled it and have found very little information on it.

(post #126308, reply #11 of 67)

How do you use one? Clamp a guide along a series of rafters and go to it?


I could not imagine freehanding with that saw.


 


All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)


                        


 


 

 

117 Groover on eBay (post #126308, reply #67 of 67)

Though

 

you guys might be interested, just saw a 117 groover on eBay. It's in great condition.

(post #126308, reply #6 of 67)

Great tool.


Hard to find these days. if you find a source let me know.

(post #126308, reply #8 of 67)

Have you used one? Any safety tips?

(post #126308, reply #10 of 67)

I used them in the late 80's , when I was doing piece work out in the valley. Seemed like alot of guys had them,I was pretty young and was spending my money on beer and new hammer handles. At that time I was rarely on the trigger , I was usually up on the plates getting yelled at for f ing up layout or nailing stuff on the wrong side of the x. Good stuf


As far as safety goes,dont drop it.


Do you have a connection for them ? Where did you get it?

(post #126308, reply #35 of 67)

I don't have a connection... I just found it on kregs list. I'm hoping that it will bolt right on to my magnesium skil saw.

(post #126308, reply #36 of 67)

Hope it slides on for ya....I saw one for sale in kansas craigs list but it was already sold , mabye that was you.


safety first

(post #126308, reply #39 of 67)

Got it in the mail today... Bolted right on. I have yet to try it out. That stack of dado blades really hums when you pull the trigger. -h

(post #126308, reply #40 of 67)

Right  on .......Post a pic if you get a chance.

(post #126308, reply #41 of 67)

Here it is... I still haven't had a chance to try it out... the blades still have the protective plastic on them. -h

(post #126308, reply #43 of 67)

I'll be the first to admit... I'm totally jealous.  Skil actually used to make a saw in that configuration right out of the box.  It was designed for plowing a dado into a beam to run wire.  Nifty framers then figured out how to remove the lower guard so you could get the bevel action to work. 


 If you ever get a chance to see the companion video to Will Holladay's "Roof Cutter's Secrets" then you can hear the story as well as see Will's totally cherry specimen of the saw.  The Skil model was called the 117 Groover.  Even the name was cool.  For me, it's the holy grail for my collection of roof cutting saws.  I'd pay $1500 for one in mint condition tomorrow if I could find one. 


(post #126308, reply #44 of 67)

I'm up for selling the one that I have. I'm realizing that i would find more uses for a beam type saw. I'm interested in the Big Foot conversion with their swing plate. I also have been looking at the Makita 16" saw. Do you know if they have a swing plate for the Makita?

(post #126308, reply #46 of 67)

I've never seen a swing table for the 16" Makita, but that doesn't mean one doesn't exist.  That being said, I seriously doubt it.  I've never owned the 16" Makita, but most of what I've read on it, and I've read a fair number of reviews on that saw, says that the saw is finicky at best.  It wouldn't be my first choice in a large circular saw.


I'd look at the 14"  Big Foot first.  It's a more substantial saw and comes with a swing table out of the box.  That being said, keep in mind that ALL of these large blade saws (especially including the Makita) have undersized motors.  This keeps their size and weight managable as well as allowing for easy conversion kits with standardized saws and parts.  But this creates a bit of a learning curve with them.  They tend to bind easy and can be frustrating at first.  I found using 2x fences tacked to the stock helped at first with long cuts.  You can and will get the hang of using them though.  Even the 10" Bigfoot has a bit of a learning curve to it, although not as bad.  Compound miters can be tricky though.  But you sure can make an octagon roof or bastard hip/valley look killer with those sharp acute angle cheek cuts.


For gang cutting birdsmouths, I'm convinced that making two passes with a saw/swing table combination is the way to go.  The dado saws tend to be useable up to around 6 pitch or so.  Here in New England, most of what I frame tends to be more like 10 and 12 pitch.  Lower pitches are fairly common in auxillary roofs... porches, shed roofs, etc.  You can get a deeper bird's mouth with a saw/swing combo too... useful for vaulted ceilings and such where it's favorable to have the bottom of the rafter plane right down to the inside of the top plate.


I'm really more interested in the dado saws for collector's reasons.  But if you're serious about selling, I'm serious about buying.  But just to clarify, when I said I'd pay $1500 for one tomorrow, I was referring to an excellent condition Skil 117 Groover, not a conversion like the Pairis unit.  But I would still be interested in your unit as well.  Shoot me an email through my profile if and when you want to sell. 


And if you have any specific questions about any of the Bigfoot Saws I'd be happy to answer them to the best of my ability.  I've got a 10" w/ regular table with a Skil77 motor.  And I've got a 10" with swing table on a Bosch 77 motor.  As well as the 14" BigBoy/swing on a Bosch motor as well.  I prefer the extra two amps of the Bosch motors on anything with a swing table.  Helps keep that blade spinning a little better.


I've also got a Big Foot Head Cutter on a Stihl gasser with a 20" bar if you decide to go that route for your ridge cuts.  That set up makes I-Joist packages far more managable, profitable,........ and fun.  ;)


Tim Uhler is another guy who hangs around here who has a wealth of information to share on these large saws and gang cutting as well.




Edited 3/28/2008 9:44 pm ET by dieselpig

(post #126308, reply #56 of 67)

Thanks for the reply. I'll be sure to let you know if/when I'm going to sell it. It came in really handy for a canoe shed that I just built. The building was going to have 10' high walls and a 12/12 pitch. I wanted to maximize the room upstairs, so I balloon framed it and let in a 2x4 for the joists to sit on. Thats where the dado saw was very handy. It cuts 2.5 inches per pass, so it took 2 passes. It really hums when it gets up to speed.

-h

(post #126308, reply #57 of 67)

Here are some pictures of the Skil dado saw in action.

(post #126308, reply #58 of 67)

I purchased the big foot head cutter for the canoe shed roof. It worked fantastic. I haven't done a whole lot of gang cutting anything before, but I've seen the light. It really is the way to go. It does take time to set up, but in the end its quicker and more predictable then cutting each piece individually. I've attached some Pictures.

-h

(post #126308, reply #59 of 67)

Nice pictures!  The Headcutter is a great tool, just be careufl :-)


 


http://picasaweb.google.com/TimothyUhler/Lot30Muirkirk/photo#5192220471367595474

www.pioneerbuildersonline.com From Lot 30 Muirkirk

http://picasaweb.google.com/TimothyUhler                                     

(post #126308, reply #60 of 67)

Thanks for sharing the pictures. I'm from Michigan and haven't seen many builders framing a roof. It seems like everyone uses trusses. I would like to try a little more complicated roof some time.

-h