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  • In a reply to How To Seal Heat Pump Refrigeration Lines Going Through Foundation Wall
    gfretwell's picture
    28 min 32 sec ago

    HVAC contractors usually use spray foam here. They should have made a drip loop in the line set tho, so rain water would flow away from the penetration.

  • In a reply to Random wiring in 80's era addition
    LynchPin's picture
    3 hours 55 min ago

    Yes!  Thanks for the info -- a little google search turned this up:

     

     http://www.drywalltalk.com/f2/electric-heat-sheetrock-980/

     

    Now it all makes sense.  Yes, the junction boxes in the two bedrooms must have been for

    thermostats.  And I forgot to mention in the original post that the wires in the cables were 14ga solid

    copper (so it couldn't have drawn that much power).  I wonder why it was abandoned.  It's too late

    to try and make it work again now...

     

    Thanks for the help!  Mystery solved!

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    DanH's picture
    6 hours 7 min ago

    So, you didn't check this guy out before you hired him?

  • In a reply to fire-retardant paint for wood stove guard (for baby)
    MarkH's picture
    6 hours 26 min ago

    If you want a wood look check out this product.  I don't know anything about it, but it sounds like an option. http://www.flamestop.com/fire-retardant-...

    Fire typically starts on lumber at sharp corners, so I would round over all edges, and would only use dense wood that is more difficult to start burning, and Ipe (ironwood) would be a good choice, as well as Oak etc.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    cybertoad's picture
    11 hours 38 min ago

    Thank you for your perspective, despite the slight appearance of dismissive condescention, although I'm sure that wasn't your intent. I guess since I'm only just spending a half milion dollars on an "entry level" home, I really shouldn't have much in the way of expectations or workmanship. I'll go an squirrel away another 2 or 3 million dollars so I can hire my own builder and pay a premium for him using a tape measure and a bubble level as opposed to "eyeballin' it."  After all, the land and permits were about $100,000, labor and materials another $150,000-$200,000 give or take, so that only leaves a measely $200,000 for profit margin. And when margins are that tight, it's easy to see how a builder could justify not spening $10 in extra materials and $50 in extra labor to do things the "right" way.  It's a "production home" after all, kind of like a 1985 Chevy Cavalier was a "production car."  Save $5.00 per car and the savings realy multiply.  And the best thing about it, nobody but overly picky people will even notice! 

  • In a reply to thinnest mezzanine floor
    oops's picture
    13 hours 57 min ago

    Now you know why  the name "Oops"

  • In a reply to Random wiring in 80's era addition
    catmandeux's picture
    16 hours 30 min ago

    Electric radiant ceiling heat.

    Still available, but not very popular.  Had to Google to see what is still available.

    ESWA and Safe-T-Flex are similar to under floor cable systems

    Therma Ray are stand alone panels integrated into the ceiling design.

    Panelectric heat panels are what you are descibing, wires embedded in drywall.


    I guessing the boxes on the walls were for thermostats that have been removed.  I'm assuming that you would have noticed a warm ceiling if there was any power going to these, and that they are inactive.  I would trace the wires to ensure that they are trully disconnected just be sure.

  • In a reply to How To Seal Heat Pump Refrigeration Lines Going Through Foundation Wall
    DanH's picture
    17 hours 19 min ago

    A picture might help, but it's a common problem.  Spray foam isn't always a good idea because it tends to cause the foam pipe insulation to deteriorate.  I've found electrician's putty to be a fair substitute since it's compounded to not attack plastics.  But there are a lot of different scenarios.

  • In a reply to How To Seal Heat Pump Refrigeration Lines Going Through Foundation Wall
    BobCochran10's picture
    17 hours 29 min ago

    Hi Dan,


    The HVAC hoses go through the concrete block foundation, but they are above ground and visible. That means they are exposed to weather, too, like rain.

    I just wonder about the best way to seal them where they penetrate the concrete block. Something like spray foam? Hydraulic cement? A putty of some sort?

    I can supply a picture if you want.

    Thanks much

    Bob

  • In a reply to Roof purlins for truss roof question
    DanH's picture
    18 hours 12 min ago

    Doesn't matter to a spammer.

  • In a reply to thinnest mezzanine floor
    DanH's picture
    18 hours 13 min ago

    Oops, you're replying to a 10-year-old thread that was revived by a spammer.

  • In a reply to Random wiring in 80's era addition
    DanH's picture
    18 hours 18 min ago

    The small wires could possibly be for resistance heating, but more likely some sort of security system.  The cabling sounds like it's for smoke detectors or security sensing or some such.

    Another possibility for the setup is that it's a sound system and the wires in the drywall somehow make it a massive subwoofer.

    If you can read any numbers on the side of the cable, that might give us a clue.

    
    

    .

  • In a reply to How To Seal Heat Pump Refrigeration Lines Going Through Foundation Wall
    DanH's picture
    18 hours 36 min ago

    Are you saying that the lines are entering the basement below the level of the ground outside?

  • In a reply to Roof purlins for truss roof question
    BossHog's picture
    19 hours 19 min ago

    Do you realize you're trying to answer a question from 2002 - -  12 years ago?

  • In a reply to thinnest mezzanine floor
    oops's picture
    21 hours 18 min ago

    You have gotten a lot of information, but when it's all said and done, you need to get an engineer involved to cover your arss.  The design and construction of stress skin floor panels is not as simple as just nailing some lunber and plywood together.  It is an engineered lumber product.

    You might want to check with the American Plywood Assoc.  It's been a while since I have built any stress skin panels, but they have a lot of info. on the subject. 

    Is this a true mezzanine (open to the floor below) or just a second story?  Is this considered residential or commercial construction?  The the design loading requirements may differ.

    (Added thought).  If open to the floor below and it would reduce the span, you could make/consider the required railing/wall as a beam to hang your floor framing on.

  • In a reply to Glad I'm Here Now!
    mike mahan's picture
    22 hours 35 min ago

    Ask questions if you need to know something. Someone will reply. Answer other peoples questions if you have knowledge. Comment on other peoples answers if you have something to add. Above all don't try to sell kitchens.

  • In a reply to Insulating old recessed convectors
    Perry525's picture
    23 hours 23 min ago

    More than 50% of the heat you are paying for is being wasted through the wall.

    The only way to stop that loss is, to fit insulation behind the radiator.

    All generally available insulation works the same way, tiny bubbles of air, trapped or loose in some product or another.

    The best insulators are all man made, and of these the sheet materials like polystyrene, polyurethane are widely available and the easiest to use. But, they only slow the loss of heat, they don't stop it. To get the best result you need thickness, and this means 6 or more inches of polystyrene.10 inches will make a difference.

    So there you have it....the only insulation better than air is a vacuum, some commercial firms are making vacuum insulation for industry. Possibly if you can weld, you can make your own vacuum panels.

  • In a reply to Roof purlins for truss roof question
    busterbrady's picture
    1 day 6 hours ago

    Yes. At the eave not only is trim provided to fit tightly at the top of the wall steel up against the roof steel, but we also provide reflective building insulation to aid in filling the voids at the steel ribs. At the ridge, we provide closed cell foam closure strips to fill the gap between the roof flashing and the ridge cap. These closures are UV-resistant and because they are closed cell, they will not soak up moisture like a sponge. 

  • In a reply to Roof purlins for truss roof question
    busterbrady's picture
    1 day 6 hours ago

    The roof itself consists of the roof trusses, roof purlins, metal building insulation, truss bracing, roof steel and screws. While the weight can vary greatly, depending upon loading requirements, it will rarely be more than four pounds per square foot. With this said, most customers ask this question because they have concerns about unloading a truck. In most cases, our vendors will be equipped to offload materials they are delivering themselves. 

  • In a reply to thinnest mezzanine floor
    busterbrady's picture
    1 day 6 hours ago

    Mezzanine floor structures which are built to have offices constructed on them have additional requirements to consider when compared to conventional “storage” ( spam link removed ) This includes resistance to flexing  and vibration, noise and temperature insulation, minimizing of columns, dust sealing, aesthetics, ease of attaching lights, ceilings, providing electrical, plumbing services through the structure etc.