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  • In a reply to joining walnut with bow tie dados
    Fonzie777's picture
    8 hours 48 min ago

    FINEFINISH,

    We transported and installed the walnut countertop today.  It fit.  We're happy with it and so are they.  Thanks again for warning me not to glue the "breadboards".  

    I'm attaching pictures.  Don

     

    PS - the Stickley's Table is covered up.  (I don't like to be around it when it isn't)  It will be interesting to get a shot of both of them.  

  • In a reply to Size of roof overhang for the south
    deadnuts's picture
    12 hours 11 min ago

    necessarily dictate standards. 4'x8', 5'x10' sheets of plywood, fibercement, & pvc are stocked by lumber yards and used for soffet construction as well. Neither of those dimension are commonly found on overhanges. Just because a particulare size of material is stocked doesn't mean it dictates "standard" architectural details.

  • In a reply to What would you pay a sub for a lead???
    sapwood's picture
    16 hours 20 min ago

    damunk wrote:

    .... I am, for all to see, pretty much a full-time employee.  And I hope to work with him for the next ten years and retire.

    If it were me, I'd take these thoughts to the contractor and tell him honestly how I felt. I'd tell him that I want to do everything in my power to help build his business so that I will have a secure next ten years as one of his main men. I'd tell him that I can bring past clients to his door and I'd tell him about this particular client (without naming any names yet) being a good one. I'd emphasize that this is only one of many possible clients if that is a possibility.

    I'd do all this in order to show the contractor that you can be a valuable employee in more ways than swinging a hammer or by telling other guys how to swing theirs. But be aware of one giant pitfall: If the contractor is hired by the client to build this house/addition, and if that relationship goes south for any reason, your long established good will with the client will go south as well. This is a risk you must accept. It may not be "fair," but its a fact. Furthermore, if the client unexpectedly acts like a bug head and proves to be a problem to the contractor, your boss; you may very likely be out of a job. The risk runs two ways.

  • In a reply to Size of roof overhang for the south
    gfretwell's picture
    18 hours 23 min ago

    "Florida" put his finger on it. If you are building in a place with a wind code, those longer overhangs become a problem.

  • In a reply to Size of roof overhang for the south
    mark122's picture
    23 hours 1 min ago

    the op is not refering to standard overhange. if you ready the entire thread youll see that the topic was brought up. the op asked if there were other standard sizes in soffit material. 12'', 16'', 24'' are readily avaliable here and most would consider those standard sizes since it is what lumber yards and suppliers carry as stock items.

  • In a reply to What would you pay a sub for a lead???
    damunk's picture
    1 day 8 hours ago

    Hey Mike, he's fully insured and has a regular staff.  He has brought me on to work with the crew and keep an eye on things.  But told me to get my own liability insurance and workman's comp and be as if I were a sub.  Pretty weird.    But I agree, if I ever did get hurt, it would come out very quickly that I am, for all to see, pretty much a full-time employee.  And I hope to work with him for the next ten years and retire.

  • In a reply to Size of roof overhang for the south
    deadnuts's picture
    1 day 8 hours ago

    There is no such thing as a "standard" overhang.

    Soffet depth (roof overhang) is usually dictated by a home's architectural style. The one you picture appears rooted in the closely related Geogian/Federal styles. Overhangs were not typically very deep; usually just enough to proportionally terminate cornice projections. Anywhere from 6" -12" is not uncommon.

    Of course you can do anthing you want with your builder, but deviating from architectural conventions is (IMO) aesthetically risky.

  • In a reply to Size of roof overhang for the south
    mark122's picture
    1 day 10 hours ago

    from your example, the one thing i would point out would be that with multiple planes and gables your overhang could be limited by the amount of windows in proximity to other gables or plane changes.

  • In a reply to Is it safe to put this granite table in the dining room?
    BossHog's picture
    1 day 10 hours ago

    What is it that's got your panties all in a bunch?

  • In a reply to Mudsill retrofit questions, and more
    deadnuts's picture
    1 day 16 hours ago

    YOur picture only tells a partial story. What's your floor system inside the garage?

  • In a reply to HOW to install those new under cabinet light strips?
    DoRight's picture
    1 day 17 hours ago

    There is no insulation or air sealing at the plate to blocking junction.  As I thought.  Thanks.

  • In a reply to basement floor
    deadnuts's picture
    1 day 17 hours ago

    Dan,

    What about failure at the mid height of full height basements that are predominatley below grade? A slab won't prevent that from happening. I believe that would be more common of a failure (particularly with unreinforced CMU and poor waterproofing) even if no slab was poured. The failure at mid height would be in bending while a wall kick out at the base would be from shear failure. I shouild think the axial load from house above and friction of foundation to wall connection (particuarly if you add in a keyway or steel dowels which are common) would easily overcome shear force of backfill. The slab could work to restrain the wall, but I don't think it usually gets to the point of being necessary. If it were, it would seem to have to be written into the code. Is it?

    Also, slabs are usually isolated from walls with 1/2" fiberboard to reduce plastic shrinkage stress cracking of slab pour. I would think that the fiberboard would have to compress at least half its material thickness before any amount of stress could be transferred to the slab. That means the wall would have to move 1/4" out of plane before being restrained by slab. I just don't see engineers or inspections letting that happen. In other words, this isolation board would be a "no go" from a structural perspective..and I am not of aware of code issues against it.

  • In a reply to Is it safe to put this granite table in the dining room?
    junkhound's picture
    1 day 17 hours ago

    thanks bb

    being an accomplished angler from the deep south knew you wud be able to get the big mouth bass to rise to the bait <G> 

    wuts a flame war anyways without the wiffle bat ? 

     

    BTW, heard tell dn like to kick weenie dogs ? 

  • In a reply to Is it safe to put this granite table in the dining room?
    deadnuts's picture
    1 day 17 hours ago

    Welcome. You'er entiltled to come over here and express your opinion...however ignorant and awkwardly expressed it might be.

  • In a reply to HOW to install those new under cabinet light strips?
    deadnuts's picture
    1 day 17 hours ago

    Insulating exposed timber frame construction is not the piont of this thread and I don't want to get off topic. I posted the LED strip light photo to show an application with this product that might be helpful to Fonzi or others.. Send me a P.M. and I'd be happy to anwswer any questions you have about this particular project with regard to insulation or framing.

  • In a reply to Size of roof overhang for the south
    yelkenli's picture
    1 day 19 hours ago

    These are great comments.  It looks like the key take away regarding energy efficiency is there are cheaper ways to become efficient.  And that is why the overhangs have been minimized in the industry. 

    I still like the idea of a larger overhang, and might go with one of the larger 'standard' sizes (16" or 20"). 

    On a two story home, is there any benefit of moving the drip line further from the siding, windows, and doors?

    Also, would larger overhangs look funky or not asthetically appealing?  This will be a high pitched multi-line roof, with multiple gables pointing to the street, and some dormers looking to the side. I would think larger would look better - up to a limit.

    Here is an example, though there will not be as much second story facing the street; the southeastern exposure will be mostly one story, with the other side being two story:

    http://cdn.houseplans.com/product/ofrvqesoq0ap2qveii1qm2quot/w1024.jpg?v=5

     

    The soffits will be wood due to neighborhood requirements.  Does that change the definition of 'standard'?

     

    Thanks,

    Ted

  • In a reply to Mudsill retrofit questions, and more
    mark122's picture
    1 day 21 hours ago

    I would not think of repairing rotten wood that is in contact with masonry with anything else but treated lumber, especially if you cant get sill seal or a like product under there.

  • In a reply to decorating
    whitetimothyaus's picture
    2 days 3 hours ago

    You can also take idea from:    worthless spam link done gone.

     

    You can also use matching curtains.

  • In a reply to Is it safe to put this granite table in the dining room?
    brownbagg's picture
    2 days 7 hours ago

    i was ask to come over here because i was told there was a couple dumb@$$ over here. look when it comes to weight on a structural it could be 2X6. The excess weight going cause the beam to bend. this weight will not collaspe the floor but could make some doors stick. all you got to do it add some cmu on soldier blocks under the 2x beams. you can shim them or they make a nifty screw jack that adjustable. I wonder why junkhound did not tell you. he proberly has some in one of the many sheds.

    but dont make me get my whiffle bat out. and dont get mad at me deadnut, just because i saw through your B/S. This is not an engineer problem its all in the load factor book that almost every hardware store has, even blows. by shorting the connect place of the beam by adding cmu you are increasing the resistance to bending of the 2x.

  • In a reply to HOW to install those new under cabinet light strips?
    DoRight's picture
    2 days 10 hours ago

    on the outside of the blocking between the beam work?