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  • In a reply to Test
    calvin's picture
    1 day 23 hours ago

    I alerted Taunton this morning with some forum screenshots sent to me by a member, so they could see what you see when trying to use Breaktime.

    I did not get a reply and now it's 5:30 edst.

     

    now I know they weren't on the same golf course as I was so I can't say why no reply.

    perhaps they were helping judge gorsuch, perhaps working the phones on the dumping of the health care act.  Beats me.

     

    keep trying to get on and we'll see if I can raise Taunton.

     

    thanks.

     

  • In a reply to Test
    calvin's picture
    2 days 11 hours ago

    I can get a post to work but others can't.

    You'd at least think you could get a UK kitchen for 595 pounds.....

  • In a reply to Green Roofing
    Sawdust_Steve's picture
    5 days 6 hours ago

    I think we all know what a green roof is.That was Junkhound's great attempt at humor...

  • In a reply to Farming Picture/Blog
    BossHog_3's picture
    5 days 10 hours ago

    A weekend with a limited amount of work on the house.

  • In a reply to Creating a better insuation & HVAC plan for my new construction urban row home.
    catmandeux's picture
    5 days 10 hours ago

    Not a hint, and I don't see it as a problem.  

    A ventilation system is required for any moderately well sealed house.  The duct work for such systems is very much smaller than that required for furnaces. and can be readly burried in interior partitions and foors / ceilings without affected the thermal envelope.   Supplimentary dehumidification  may only be required during the most muggy days in the summer if the whole house is cooled, or for the basement if the owner chooses to leave windows open for  natural ventilation.

  • In a reply to Creating a better insuation & HVAC plan for my new construction urban row home.
    DanH's picture
    5 days 18 hours ago

    Of course, as you hint, you will have problems with such systems due to the non-movement of air.  At least some ductwork is needed to have an air exchange system to draw in fresh air, and a dehumidifier would be needed in most non-desert climates.

  • In a reply to Framing a concrete block wall
    finefinish's picture
    5 days 19 hours ago

    Hey Matt,

        Just be careful with 2x3"s because getting plumbing in that wall depth is tough/impossible.  If all you have is electrical going in those outside walls, then 2x3"s on the flat would be fine too and would only push you out the extra 1.5" past the foam.  I wouldn't bother with spray foam unless you have alot of it to do.  Most foam guys have a day minimum which in my area is 1800 bucks.  You can buy a lot of sheet foam for that price. Good luck.  

  • In a reply to Creating a better insuation & HVAC plan for my new construction urban row home.
    catmandeux's picture
    5 days 20 hours ago

    Radiant (floor) heating and cooling will provide all the heat and cooling you need without any ducts at all, and as many zones as you want.    It is a simple system, but requires some attention to detail. It should be designed and installed by someone who is experienced in hydronic systems.   It will probably not be your builder / HVAC sub, since they only mentioned multiple furnaces/condensors.

    Add a heat recovery ventilation system, with its duct work run through the floor/ceiling  to provide the required air exhange. 

    Because radiant cooling systems do not condense water vapour out of the air, a dehumidifier may be required as part of the ventilation system.

    A mini split heat pump system can also be used to provide cooling instead of the radiant system, as well as most of the heat required for the radiant  system.  A very small boiler, or using the domestic water heater,   can provide supplement heat as required.

    No ducts running through the walls required.  Seal the house up tight and insulate with the most cost effecitive way for your area.

  • In a reply to Creating a better insuation & HVAC plan for my new construction urban row home.
    DanH's picture
    5 days 22 hours ago

    I think you want too much.

  • In a reply to Creating a better insuation & HVAC plan for my new construction urban row home.
    cussnu2's picture
    5 days 23 hours ago

    You would be better off at the GREENBUILDINGADVISOR.com sight.  They have a lot of people there that are very knowledgeable in this particular area...be prepared to get the suggestion that you use wall mounted heat pumps which carry the advantge of no duct work.

  • In a reply to Framing a concrete block wall
    Matt291's picture
    6 days 17 hours ago

    I know about the two layers of linoleum and top layer of plywood that can be seen in the picture. What else is there - I guess I'll find out!! There's about an inch difference in the floors between rooms because of the changes over the years. It's driving me crazy so I'm just going down to the rafters and starting fresh. Hopefully that way I'll avoid another headache later on!

  • In a reply to Framing a concrete block wall
    DanH's picture
    6 days 18 hours ago

    When my parents remodeled the old farmhouse they'd purchased (it was about 60 years old at the time) they found something like 12 layers of linoleum in the old kitchen.  Separated by layers of cat poop (the prior owners kept about 10 cats inside and another 20 or so outside).  Under layer 8, I think it was, they found a newspaper with the headline "Lindbergh hailed in New York".  Under the bottom-most layer they found a dead mouse.

    No telling what's under that flooring.

  • In a reply to Framing a concrete block wall
    Matt291's picture
    6 days 18 hours ago

    Most of my concern, in an already small kitchen, was losing more space from framing the walls. I briefly considered replacing the furring strips, but I hate them, so quickly decided against that. The other thing I was thinking about was using 2x3 instead of 2x4, especially if I end up using rigid foam. I was going to have a professional come in for real spray foam insulation.

    So, a little more info on the house. Property was purchased 1948 and the house was built between then and 1950. The town has 1950 on record as the year built and I'm assuming that is the year the final inspection was completed. The house was built by my grandfather. Unfortunately, the last relative that would have been able to give me any sort of detail about the construction passed away three years ago to the day. The walls are concrete block from the bottom of the basement walls all the way through to the top of the first floor. The second floor starts wood framing. For some reason, I was unable to post a picture of where the block ends and wood framing begins for the second floor.

    All of the exterior walls are just furring strips. It almost looks like the block has been coated with tar, I don't actually know what it is. Interior walls butt right up against the block, to include the load bearing wall to the right in the image SideDoor.jpg.

    Part of this project is going to include ripping up the multiple layers of flooring and plank subfloor to be replaced with plywood and finally porcelain tile.

    Thank you all for the help so far, and especially for that recommendation of extra blocking... hadn't even considered that and never even thought that far in advance yet. Project is unfortunately pretty slow going because of my crazy work schedule.

  • In a reply to Creating a better insuation & HVAC plan for my new construction urban row home.
    matthicks024's picture
    1 week 46 min ago

    The house is a total open concept, so the load supporting beams will run the short width of the house.  The only walls on the first floor are in the very back of the house behidn the kitchen which creatse a space for a pantry/mudroom/half bath near the entry from the garage.  

    Above that wall is a totally open living room and above that the master bedroom.  There is no way to run duct work the long length of the home because of the load bearing floor beams running east to west.  We are trying to have no lowered ceilings or wall kcikouts for duct work.  

    there is one area that could have an interior run next to a closet on the first floor and running up through closets on the 2nd and third floors, but we are going for a lot of zones in the home given the 3 floors and long width of the home, so one space for interior chases doesn't get me that far.  

    I uploaded the floorplan section CDs for reference 

  • In a reply to Creating a better insuation & HVAC plan for my new construction urban row home.
    DanH's picture
    1 week 1 hour ago

    I would consider whether there isn't some way to get an interior chase for some of the mechanicals.  Doesn't have to be the full width of a wall, and a minor amount of "jogging" between floors would be acceptable.

  • In a reply to Framing a concrete block wall
    DanH's picture
    1 week 2 hours ago

    Do make sure that the framing is stoutly fastened at the top, as any sort of cabinet attached to the wall can produce a significant sideways force.

  • In a reply to Framing a concrete block wall
    finefinish's picture
    1 week 6 hours ago

    Hi Matt,  I would recommend removing the furring.  Then install at least 1" of XPS foam sheet insulation directly to the block with adhesive.  Can foam the gaps and tape the seams.  You could use more insulation if you have room inside.  You want something impermeable to isolate your new wall assembly from the masonry.  Then you can frame a 2x4" wall in front of the insulation making it plumb and straight regardless of what the block wall is doing behind it.  This gives you room for your utilities.  You don't need headers, but I would recommend plenty of blocking for hanging your cabinets etc.   Good luck.  I hope you find this forum helpful as you continue your project.   

  • In a reply to Framing a concrete block wall
    calvin's picture
    1 week 7 hours ago

    A little more information please.  Do you have stud framed walls abutting block walls?  I'm unsure of how to answer with what's given.

     

    If in a stud wall you have loads bearing upon door or window openings then of course properly constructed headers are needed.

    thanks.

  • In a reply to Farming Picture/Blog
    BossHog_3's picture
    1 week 8 hours ago

    A week of various things, from work on the house to planter parts.

  • In a reply to Pros and Cons of window/trim finishing
    DanH's picture
    1 week 22 hours ago

    I have seen it done several ways.  A lot depends on how much "improvisation" may be required, and also what sort of finish is being used.

    If you have 100 identical windows to be trimmed, with no anticipated variations, it makes sense to pre-cut the trim (WARNING:  Trial-fit a few pieces before you cut all 100 sets!), finish, then install.  Follow up with a final coat/touch-up as needed.

    If you have a lot of odd sizes it's much more convenient (especially with dark stain that takes some skill to keep uniform) to stain/paint the uncut pieces and then cut to fit as needed.  The disadvantage, of course, is that the cut ends (plus any minor chipping from the saw blade) will show up white and so considerable touch-up is manditory.  (When staining, it's generally best to stain the cut ends before installation.  With paint you can instead follow up with a second coat after the install.)

    The third option is to install the trim unfinished and then apply the finish.  This is generally only practical if adjacent surfaces have not been finished yet, as otherwise considerable masking and tarping is likely required.  (Yes, you can carefully do one window without spilling or getting an "oops" on the adjacent wall, but can you do 10 windows in 5 rooms?)  There's also the issue, with stain, of getting an even coat near the ends of the pieces.

    If painting vs staining it's a little more practical to finish after installation, or at least do a complete second coat after.  With paint it's nice to have the paint span/hide joints in in the wood.