Search the forums

Loading

Recent Replies

  • In a reply to need feedback re: concrete slab
    deadnuts's picture
    4 min ago

    coonass wrote:

    Wire does nothing to improve the tensile strength of a slab....

    YOur right; you do have alot to still learn. I'm wishing you all the best in making sure that happens.

  • In a reply to Waterproofing with plastic membrane behind durock or durock with Redgard when insulation is spray foam?
    deadnuts's picture
    14 min 4 sec ago

    Dan, you're talking about plumbing leaks here; not shower surface waterproofing. No material or best construction practices are designed to combat that issue.

    You're so far off base that it isn't funny.

  • In a reply to Waterproofing with plastic membrane behind durock or durock with Redgard when insulation is spray foam?
    deadnuts's picture
    19 min 44 sec ago

    I didn't infer that Redgard wasn't a vapor barrier. I clearly stated that it was junk.

    And no; I don't use a mil thickness guage. I dont need to. I use Kerdi. It's 8 mil all the time...every time.

    I understand your point, Mondo, that HB is not technically a vapor barrier because it does not fall below the threshold of 1 perm. I should have stated that it is marketed as a water barrier rather than a vapor barrier and I stand corrected on that minor point. However, the larger point is that is marketed to do the same thing Kerdi does which is to be used as a surface waterproofing membrane under shower tile installations. Whether it is technically  a water barrier or vapopr barrier is a small degree of difference (.25 perm) that is inconsequential in terms of its use in normal showers. Remember, vapor drive is not an issue in regular showers.

    Let me illustrate the fallacy of using HB (or Redguard for that matter) for surface waterproofing.  It is fullly recommended for surface waterproofing regular shower conditions (the point of the original post), but not recommended for steam rooms unless it is used in conjunction with a vapor barrier. Think about that for a minute. It is saying that it is okay to use it in steam rooms in conjunction with something like kerdi or kerdi DS, but not by itself.  Well, Kerdi or Kerdi DS can do the job all by itself without the aid of Hydroban. Why would anyone (but an idiot) use it in conjunction with? That's like a garment manufacturer marketing a nylon windbreaker as keeping you dry in a rain storm as long as you are wear it in conjunction with a rubberized overcoat. Well, duh!

    Anyhow, that is but another reason I recommend (in all cases including steamers) Kerdi over HB or Redgard. It installs just as easy (if not easier) and is relatively cost effective to install. Both HB and RG are (IMO) junk. Kerdi reaches the threshold of a water barrier and a vapor barrier all the time, everytime. Further (and to the point of the OP) this negates the necessity for a polyetheleyne or tar paper liner under the tile substrate and the type of wall cavity insulation becomes a moot point.

  • In a reply to Matching a Stanley Garage Door
    Barshfield's picture
    2 hours 54 min ago

    My tablet is slow to respond and I thought it wasn't accepting my post when I hit "post."  I suppose if I wanted to scream I would have said it like THIS. :)

    Thanks for your suggestions.

  • In a reply to Needling experience
    oops's picture
    4 hours 1 min ago

    DanH. You should be ashamed of yourself.  Now say you are sorry.

  • In a reply to Older house electrical
    gfretwell's picture
    5 hours 30 min ago

    If you spend an extra buck an outlet and get the spec grade self grounding receptacle, you don't even need to mess with the ground wire, as long as the box is grounded.

  • In a reply to Older house electrical
    DanH's picture
    5 hours 33 min ago

    A house built in 1965, if it was built to code, should at least have ground wires in the outlet boxes.  (Built a year or two later, depending on when the newer code was adopted locally, it would have had to have 3-prong outlets.)  So in theory (if the electrician followed code) you should be able to remove the 2-prong outlet and install an 3-prong outlet and connect it to the ground wire.

  • In a reply to Older house electrical
    gfretwell's picture
    6 hours 23 min ago

    There is a chance that you have a grounded wiring method and they just put in 2 pin receptacles.Look and see if there is a bare ground wire going to the box. If so you can buy self grounding receptacles and be good to go.

  • In a reply to Geodesic Dome Roof Advice/Help
    MarkH's picture
    6 hours 32 min ago

    Good points.  I was wondering about the same things.  I think it would be an irregular surface, likely ugly.  I don't know how it would hold up to hail, possibly well, but likely not.  There could be dew point issues,  but that dome is in a fairly moderate climate, so I kind of doubt that would be a problem.  I think a lot of problems would be related to the skill of the "roofer".  I found it interesting though.

    TPO would make a nice roof, as long as all the seams were done nice, which could be, but that would be a lot of labor, in my opinion.  But I'm no roofer. 


    Copper would be pretty cool.  Probably it would be prohibitively expensive.

  • In a reply to Leaky Anderson 1961 Slider windows
    Seanster's picture
    6 hours 37 min ago

    Hi Kyje,

    I'm having the same problem with some of my vintage Andersen Prime Gliding Windows (c. late 1950s).  I get rain water infiltrating through the bottom in moderate to heavy storms.  Of the four window sets, those with the greatest exposure to the elements are having the greatest issues.

    Did you ever identify a solution to your issue?

    Many thanks.

    John

  • In a reply to Is my drywaller trying to pull a fast one?
    mark122's picture
    10 hours 36 min ago

    Well hope he doesnt take one persons opinion to personally...

  • In a reply to Needling experience
    mark122's picture
    10 hours 45 min ago

    Wow Dan, guess its your time of the month... Why would you even chime in on (a basic subject) that you are obviously ingnorant about?

    If you have never heard of this incredibly rudimentary process in masonry construction and repair, you should keep your comments to yourself. 

    If for those a little more familiar with a line of work called "construction" my question is unclear, I am wondering if anyone here in the US has seen, or knows where to purchase acrow props and strong boys. Have had not luck searching my local/surrounding markets.

  • In a reply to paint striping parking lots
    salyarcht's picture
    11 hours 46 min ago

    Does concrete striping have to be done every 5 years like asphalt or can it be applied less since paint is oil?

  • In a reply to need feedback re: concrete slab
    coonass's picture
    11 hours 55 min ago

    I've only been doing construction since '77 so I'm still learning. Most slabs crack because of too much water added and an uncompacted base. Wire does nothing to improve the tensile strength of a slab but fiber will add a little. Your interpertation of code is off also.

    With 6 inches of concrete and rebar that may or may not be in the correct plane I still say his slab is fine for a driveway.

    KK

  • In a reply to Waterproofing with plastic membrane behind durock or durock with Redgard when insulation is spray foam?
    DanH's picture
    12 hours 5 min ago

    One thing to keep in mind:  A (halfway modern) shower wall rarely (if ever) fails due to simple moisture migration through the tile.  Rather, leaks occur when the shower head connection sprays back into the wall, water runs down the wall and behind the control, water seeps in at the joint with the tub, or water gets in at corners or other points apt to develop cracks.  These are the things you want to protect against.

    Partly it's a matter of sealing well at these locations, but partly understanding that, sooner or later, SOME water is going to get in SOMEHOW, so the structure should be designed to tolerate it.

    In this regard, at the very least don't use drywall (even if "moisture resistant") as a tile base, but something more resistant to moisture damage.  And it probably is worth avoiding a really "strong" vapor barrier behind the tile base, to give any leakage at least a fighting chance to escape.

  • In a reply to Windows or Insulation to Improve Temp Differences
    DanH's picture
    12 hours 18 min ago

    Yep, the IR thermometer is a good idea, if you can get the measurements done on a warm/sunny day.  The windows will always (one hopes) be warmer than the walls, but the walls should only be 2-3 degrees warmer than a wall not in the sun.

  • In a reply to Needling experience
    DanH's picture
    12 hours 26 min ago

    Needling?  You're going to hold everything together with cross-stitch?

    (I couldn't make heads or tails out of what you were asking.)

  • In a reply to Waterproofing with plastic membrane behind durock or durock with Redgard when insulation is spray foam?
    DoRight's picture
    13 hours 46 min ago

    Get used to it.  Par for the course with deadnuts.

    Bi Polar if you ask me.

  • In a reply to Waterproofing with plastic membrane behind durock or durock with Redgard when insulation is spray foam?
    DoRight's picture
    13 hours 50 min ago

    WOW, talk about additude on seroids!   But,  ... as ususal.

  • In a reply to Is my drywaller trying to pull a fast one?
    DoRight's picture
    14 hours 6 min ago

    Careful, Mark.  Deadnut loves plastic.  You are insulting the guy.