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  • In a reply to Moisture inside interior electrical switch boxes. FL home - block/stucco on slab.
    gfretwell's picture
    2 hours 55 min ago

    The paint is the vapor barrier on a CBS  house in Florida. The outside wall is the "warm moist side". When my wife was building houses, they would not even start the drywall until they got a coat of paint on the stucco.

  • In a reply to Your thoughts on exposure to fiberglass insulation during remodel?
    user-4918854's picture
    4 hours 43 min ago

    Thanks Dan, kind of what I'm starting to settle on. In fact, she can probably staple up some plastic while I'm working on elec rough-in. Even offer to buy a portable air filter if that will make her feel better, if it will let me focus on the outside tasks while we still have some decent weather.

  • In a reply to Deep Energy Retrofit
    DanH's picture
    5 hours 19 min ago

    For those of us who aren't up on the latest lingo, what does "deep energy retrofit" mean?

  • In a reply to Moisture inside interior electrical switch boxes. FL home - block/stucco on slab.
    coonass's picture
    5 hours 49 min ago

    If your duct work is in the attic it may be leaking and depressurizing the house. Smoke stick is a cheap way to check but a blower door test is better. Sometimes the POCO will subsidize these.

    KK

  • In a reply to Flashing or Caulk at Window head detail
    finefinish's picture
    6 hours 43 min ago

    Hey there, If I understand you correctly, the siding is going to land on top of the window head or head trim and be caulked. This needs to be flashed and NOT caulked at all.  Florida's response is dead on if he and I understand your situation.  Have your contractor stop immediately and do it right.  I can't imagine why he would not do this properly.  It is Building 101, doesn't cost hardly anything, and doesn't take any time at all to install window flashing. This is scary 

  • In a reply to Heatilator stovepipe
    franco86's picture
    7 hours 39 sec ago

    would you still happen to have this Mark 700 pipe sections?

  • In a reply to Farming Picture/Blog
    BossHog's picture
    7 hours 47 min ago

    This set is from Thursday through Sunday of the Lion's carnival.

    I decided to post them all at once,as it comes out more like a story that way. A little more continuity.



    Thursday:
    http://s000.tinyupload.com/index.php?fil...

    Friday:
    http://s000.tinyupload.com/index.php?fil...

    Saturday:
    http://s000.tinyupload.com/index.php?fil...

    Sunday:
    http://s000.tinyupload.com/index.php?fil...
     

  • In a reply to Your thoughts on exposure to fiberglass insulation during remodel?
    DanH's picture
    9 hours 45 min ago

    Fiberglass particles, when stirred up, do not stay airborne very long.  And fiberglass fibers are relatively innocuous in the body (though of course any sort of foreign particle in the body is not a thing to be desired).  Sawdust is far more likely to stay in the air and work its way into the lungs.  And drywall dust (especially from sanding) stays in the air to significant degree plus the dust is caustic and can cause scarring if enough of it is inhaled.

    A lot of people confuse fiberglass dust with asbestos dust, which is present in old insulations (older than 50 years or so), but asbestos produces far finer particles which are far more toxic.

    Also, of course, one may encounter lead dust from old paint (older than 50 years).  Lead is quite toxic.

    In general, if the fiberglass is in place and either covered with a paper or plastic backing or laying horizontal in an unoccupied attic (and the building is closed up against the wind to a reasonable degree) it will not produce significant amounts of loose particles. 

    You might wish, just for your wife's piece of mind, to staple up a plastic VB on the exposed fiberglass in those two rooms.  That should only take an hour or so.

  • In a reply to Flashing or Caulk at Window head detail
    florida's picture
    13 hours 59 min ago

    Baloney. If your house is  built using caulk to keep water out you're in big trouble. The absolutely worse possible caulk to use is silicone. Silcones only use is possibly in the bathroom and rarely there. Your builder is a hack. Head flashing is the only way to keep water out of your house. The head flashing should be flashed under the housewrap or the top should be sealed with butyl tape.  There is no substitute. Period.

     

    Get your builder to show you the siding manfacturers installation instructions using caulk. Maybe he'll learn something.

  • In a reply to Moisture inside interior electrical switch boxes. FL home - block/stucco on slab.
    florida's picture
    14 hours 4 min ago

    If you have a wall mounted light or electric outlet  on the outside near these switches that will usually be the source of the mositure. You'll need to iunstall waterproof boxes and caulk around them. I'm in south florida and have run into the same problem several times. Wind blown rain gets in the boxes and runs down conduits or the wall.

  • In a reply to Mold on framing
    florida's picture
    14 hours 8 min ago

    Framing wood almost always will have mold on it. Southern yellow pine not so much but the western softwoods like hemlock and fir

    pretty much always have it. You can safely ignore it. Mold spores are everywhere. It's not possible to live and not breath in mold.  Openinga bag of mulch will release millions of mold spores right in your face.

  • In a reply to heat loss
    florida's picture
    14 hours 12 min ago

    Probably quite a bit. Most heat loss in a home is through the roof so if you have holes there the hot air will really get sucked out.

  • In a reply to Caulk over primed cinder block wall to fill in grout to create smooth surface
    florida's picture
    14 hours 14 min ago

    Most good paint stores will sell "Block filler" which will do exactly what you want.

  • In a reply to Help save my sander. Sandpaper wont stick
    florida's picture
    14 hours 15 min ago

    No, you'll need a new pad. I replace mine every 3 or 4 years but I don't use it much.

  • In a reply to Your thoughts on exposure to fiberglass insulation during remodel?
    cussnu2's picture
    17 hours 12 min ago

    Cancel your internet....seriously you can find someone on the internet to blame anything for their health issues....if you read the internet long enough you'll end up eating cardboard and drinking himilayan spring water filtered through the dirty sock of a tibitan monk.

     

    But that isn't going to satisfy your wife so your better option is just bite the bullet take out a loan and get someone to finish the thing.....its not going to be a long before she stops blaming the insulation and starts blaming you and the long and short of it is hiring someone to finish it will be a dang site cheaper than hiring a lawyer.

  • In a reply to Help save my sander. Sandpaper wont stick
    calvin's picture
    18 hours 52 min ago

    most quality pad sanders offer replacement pads, did you check?  Rigid had some lifetime warranty mumbo jumbo, perhaps yours is covered.

    is the peel and stick paper too old?

  • In a reply to Drywall/wood to concrete glue
    calvin's picture
    18 hours 57 min ago

    Yes, PL Premium urethane adhesiveis available at the boxes as well as many quality building supply stores.

    often in both large and small tubes.

    being urethane, not always easy to work with.  If on your hands you can count on a dark residue that may last for a couple washings.  Don't plan to go out to eat at a place with some ambiance that evening.

    also, often the tube will keep spewing after the trigger is released.  A spike stuffed into the end with a knob of paper towel on the head and propped against something will limit the loss and mess.  When the spike drys in the tube, you usually can pull it out with the claw of a hammer, but try to use soon after opening.

    Remove from caulk gun so any oozing out the back doesn't permanently glue the tube to the gun.

  • In a reply to Caulk over primed cinder block wall to fill in grout to create smooth surface
    calvin's picture
    19 hours 7 min ago

    a parge coating (skim coat with mortar) will fill the grout joints as well as the pores in the block.

    think of a smooth stucco.

     

  • In a reply to heat loss
    DanH's picture
    1 day 8 hours ago

    Single pane glass has an R of about 1.  Double pane glass has a R of about 2, and triple pane about 3.  The glass being fogged will cut the R value slightly, but probably not enough to justify replacing the glass for energy savings.

    With skylights another potential issue is heat loss through the walls -- there's probably a lot of variation there between brands/styles.

  • In a reply to Moisture inside interior electrical switch boxes. FL home - block/stucco on slab.
    DanH's picture
    1 day 8 hours ago

    Assuming you run the AC most of the time, the condensation is from outside humidity, not room humidity.  When the wind blows, air comes into the house through the outlet boxes.  This is "normal" for a poorly-sealed house. 

    If the inside temp is 76 and the dewpoint outside is above that, you will get condensation where the air blows in.  This will pretty much only happen in the South, since those conditions are not often met other places (like here in Minnesota).

    The proper "fix" is to somehow seal the holes where the air leaks in.  This might be, eg, behind a light fixture on the outside of the house, or it could be where a cable runs down into a wall from the attic, or up from a crawl space.