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  • In a reply to Coffee shop renovations
    Sprung's picture
    1 day 8 hours ago

    This is such a great and beautiful renovations! Congratulations! Anyway, I'm a new member of the forum si it's my first time seeing your post! Great!

  • In a reply to White hardwood?
    MarkH's picture
    1 day 15 hours ago

    It's probably Paulownia, or Aspen. 

  • In a reply to White hardwood?
    deadnuts's picture
    1 day 15 hours ago

    Seems Menards is taking their product labeling cues from Lowe's out in California.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    deadnuts's picture
    1 day 15 hours ago

    Looks like the culprit is some badly crowned truss chords. Could it have been shimmed to plane out better for drywall? Sure; by a conscientious custom builder. But by a production oriented tract home framer? Not gonna happen. Just another example of getting what you pay for.

    Here's a couple of solutions to consider:

    1.Sounds like you're a person that expects a certain amount of precision in your life. I think that's great. But you're shopping in the wrong arena. My advice is to return your deposit, save your money, then hire a custom builder that can deliver a product that makes your life better and utimately makes you happier.

    2. If you can't do that, than realize that you got what you paid for. I seriously doubt it is something that a home inspector would ever flag. The case your making for compromising the value of your asset is all in your head. Also, contrary to what you may think, crown moulding can easily be installed on your ceiling.... and made to look fine. If you're planning to paint very contrasting colors, that would be a mistake since you know the condition. Don't try to spotlight it. Stay monochromaic in your paint scheme; or close to it. Ony the most anal amongst us would be aethestically offended by it's presence in a tract home.

    3. Try being real nice to your construction super on your job while it's still being finished up. Explain your OCD over a case of beer and a few extras bucks. He may just find a way to have his drywall/painter make it all look good for you in the end.

    4. Lastly, buy some setting compound and fix it yourself after you move it. It will be a good story (with a happy ending) to share with friends over desert and coffee.

    Good luck! And remember: There are some things to worry about in life. This isn't one of them.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    oldhand's picture
    1 day 16 hours ago

    Counting up here, looks like I have 38 experience mostly in Arkansas and have very rarely seen drywall not nailed to the trusses.

    It can be made to work.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    gfretwell's picture
    1 day 16 hours ago

    Some builders will do anything to save a few bucks I guess. This is literally a few bucks too.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    florida's picture
    1 day 17 hours ago

    I've never seen drywall installed directly on trusses. All the houses I've worked on had 1 x 4" s  24" on center for the drywall to hang from. Low spots can be quickly shimmed in line. 

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    cybertoad's picture
    1 day 19 hours ago

    Yep, premanufactured trusses. I have some pictures that I took before the drywall went up. I'll have to see if there is something else they're nailing to on the right-hand side other than the trusses.

  • In a reply to Framing Wall On Top of Sagging Floor Joists
    mark122's picture
    1 day 21 hours ago

    Unless you see a problem with your joist then you more than likely are assessing the problem correctly. I also live in an old house (1904) and althoughy I have addressed most of the floor issues in the house a little bump or dip doesn't bother me either.

    If the dip doesn't bother you then I would  frame the wall conventionally and make up the gap where you top plate meet your blocking. 

    Putting in a beam to gain that dip back would be simple since you are looking at your crawl space, another benefit to putting a beam in would be to eliminate the bounce you more than likely have  when you walk across the room.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    mark122's picture
    1 day 21 hours ago

    Is the roof built with trusses? I know you mentioned trusses but it would be hard to imagine a truss crowning that bad. The times I have seen this is when the framers are either to lazy or to inexperienced to look for the crown on ceiling joist...

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    cybertoad's picture
    2 days 3 min ago

    Here is a better picture to illustrate the problem. If it were just a raised area, I wouldn't have an issue, because that could be filled. But if you look toward the right hand wall, that area droops down about 1/2 - 3/4 inch off-plane (probably closer to 3/4") and is the lowest point of the ceiling. Ironically, on the other side of the room, the same thing occurrs, so the whole room has an ever so slight "dome" effect.  (See the new photo for better illustration.) So, to actually "level" the ceiling, they would have to put about 5 gallons of mud the middle 70% of the ceiling.  As others have pointed out, the builder probably will NOT budge on this, but I'm not going to give up without trying. My issue goes back to the crown molding though -- to me, if the ceiling is so off-plane that I can't properly install crown molding, it is a defect in workmanship and, as such, lowering my property value, especially if it's something that a home inspector may potentially flag on a future resale of the property.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    gfretwell's picture
    2 days 1 hour ago

    You put your finger right on the problem. They did not fur/shim the bottom of the trusses before they put up the drywall and you got what the truss manufacturer sent them.

    If the job super is not willing to fix it, I doubt it will be fixed unless you threaten not to close until they do.

    Then it will depend on whether they think a year of delay (or whatever the case would take in court) is worth more than simply doing it right. They do have the option of simply giving you your money back and sending you down the road. They might believe it will be easier to sell the house again and get rid of a troublesome customer that will never be happy. That is not out of the realm of possibility and you trying to sue for "specific performance" is even more unlikely to result in a win.

  • In a reply to Software question
    bski's picture
    2 days 4 hours ago

    Hi.  I purchased Home Designer a while back for the same purposes.  I don't do a lot of designing but its a nice feature to offer.  I bought it having no computer drafting skills.  It is fairly easy to use, especially if you are just going to do simple interior drawings. They have a good support program and a forum if you get stumped.  I am getting better at using it, but I did have quite a few hours of head scratching when I got started with it.  There are so many features and options on it that the only way you could be a pro with it is if you used it every day or took classes.

    The program itself is only $500, but you also have to have a really good computer to use it on.  If you need to get a good computer for it, you should figure in another $1000 for that.  I am sure that would apply to any program you purchase, though. I also bought a larege scale printer for about $300.  The cost is like anything else.  If you use it enough, it will pay for itself.  I sold my first plan with it just because it had 3D drawings.  Transfering 3D drawings in color to an iPad is easy.  It really helps homeowners make decisions on design when they can see their furniture and cabinets and such in place.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    MarkH's picture
    2 days 5 hours ago

    There is nothing wrong with filling a depression with compound.  It's best to start with a perfectly flat surface before mud and tape, but finishers can work with worse than that.

    Edit: I didnt read the part that that the ceiling is already finished.  It can still be redone with compound if required.

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    cybertoad's picture
    2 days 10 hours ago

    Thanks all for your input. Much appreciated.

    Just downloaded a copy of the builder's warranty, which stipulates "A ceiling made of drywall that has bows or depressions that equal or exceed 1/2 of an inch out of line within a 32-inch measurement as measured from the center of the bow or depression running parallel with a ceiling joist or within 1/2 of an inch deviation from the plane of the ceiling within any eight-foot measurement is a deficiency."

    It appears to me that there is definitely a 1/2 inch deviation from the plane of the ceiling. I will certainly know for sure when I bring a ladder and a 72" box level to the final walkthrough. 

  • In a reply to Bronze weatherstripping
    DanH's picture
    2 days 14 hours ago

    The problem with wooden doors is that they're not dimensionally stable.  If you use one with compression gaskets, for instance, the constant pressure from the gaskets bows the door until they no longer seal.  And spring brass weatherstripping depends on an exceptionally close and consistent fit which can't be maintained as a wood door shrinks and swells with seasonal changes.

    There's not really a good solution.  About the best you can do is visit a big box and pick out whatever gasket looks like it might work, then try to make it work.

    (But the scheme shown in your diagram is probably pretty good, if it's fitting well.  Might be best to try to make it work a bit better, vs removing it and trying something else.)

  • In a reply to Uneven drywall ceiling - new construction
    deadnuts's picture
    2 days 14 hours ago

    If you're expecting to force someone to do anything here, you'll first need to specifically describe how this cosmetic issue qualifies as an "actionable defect" under California law.  That is most likely the same question  a judge will want answered...if he or she doesn't throw your case out of the courtroom all together.

     

    BTW, slapping more mud on could qualify as a reasonable fix. However, IMO removing all the drywall to shim a high spot on a textured ceiling qualifies as ridiculous.

  • In a reply to hot roof,,,able to leave existing insulation in attic ??
    newtique's picture
    2 days 14 hours ago
    is there any place you know of for me to find what the formula's are to do the numbers. Or the title of a resource so I can get in the loop. This is my first energy retrofit,it will not be my last. I want to do it right,, why do the guides want the loose fill insulation next to the underside of the roof? Anyone out there have any ideas how to move it up there without tearing the roof off? 4/12 pitch roof leaves little room to work under. Really don't want to waste all the material that's already installed.
  • In a reply to Bronze weatherstripping
    jyang949's picture
    2 days 15 hours ago

    It's a wooden door, possibly original to the house (1932). The metal strip on the door is nailed in place.

    Janet

  • In a reply to Bronze weatherstripping
    DanH's picture
    2 days 16 hours ago

    There are a number of different weatherstripping schemes, but the only one that I know works is a steel door with magnetic weatherstripping.

    The next step down from that are several vinyl weatherstripping schemes.

    Spring brass works moderately well if very carefully fit.  But it hardly ever is.