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  • In a reply to Hole in joist for wire
    DanH's picture
    1 day 10 hours ago

    One hint:  Don't use a larger bit than you need.  You don't need a 1" hole in most cases -- I don't recall for sure, but I'm thinking 9/16 will do for standard 14 gauge romex.

  • In a reply to Track lighting in bathroom?
    gfretwell's picture
    1 day 16 hours ago

    You are OK as long as it is not over the bath tub but I would still put it on the GFCI.

  • In a reply to Capillary break
    oldhand's picture
    1 day 19 hours ago

    I misread that before my earlier reply. Like others have pointed out there is no such thing as a capillary break between the footing and wall. As far as I ever heard anyway. Top of wall, different story.

  • In a reply to Hole in joist for wire
    jyang949's picture
    1 day 19 hours ago

    renosteinke wrote:

    A true "Forstener" bit is a drill-press only tool. 

    I didn't know that. Thanks for the info.

  • In a reply to restain cedar siding
    DanH's picture
    1 day 19 hours ago

    Pigments in the finish protect it from UV damage.

  • In a reply to attic with windows and spray foam insul.
    DanH's picture
    1 day 19 hours ago

    Once again, water vapor doesn't rise.  It mixes with air and will achieve nearly equal "partial pressure"  throughout the enclosed space, regardless of elevation.  That's physics.

  • In a reply to Hole in joist for wire
    DanH's picture
    1 day 20 hours ago

    A "spade bit" is the usual choice, but one needs to be a bit careful (even with the SpeedBor Max style) as spade bits tend to "grab" and can cause injury if they catch you unprepared.

    I don't want to overstate this, just be careful.

  • In a reply to Attic ventalation
    DanH's picture
    1 day 20 hours ago

    My understanding has always been that the speced number of square inches of vent should be rougjhly equally divided between soffit and rooftop.

  • In a reply to Capillary break
    DanH's picture
    1 day 20 hours ago

    If the joint is below ground it seems pointless to insert a capillary break.

  • In a reply to attic with windows and spray foam insul.
    damunk's picture
    1 day 21 hours ago

    I guess where my head was going with this is that because water vapor rises, it will be most prevalent in the attic and with winter in the northeast, this area would be the most suspect as far as "wet windows". I guess no big deal.  The attic windows are single pane because prior to this it was an unconditioned space so probably worst case he has some sashes to replace.

  • In a reply to restain cedar siding
    calvin's picture
    1 day 22 hours ago

    For the longest time, clear base exterior coatings have the disclaimer-won't hold up as long and one that is pigmented.  Beats me why-but that is the story.  So, it protects but recoat time is shorter.

    You might find something from Sikkens that carries a better "warranty.

  • In a reply to concealed hardware for exposed rafters
    calvin's picture
    1 day 22 hours ago

    So there's no structural reason or connection sped'd?

    If it's only to hold up the blocking-then toe-screwing with a proper length "deck" screw (Trapese) from Fastenmaster. 

    Bore a hole straight in (1 inch, maybe 3/4) the side of the blocking close to the end at rafter.  Bore the hole 3/4" deep.  Angle the screw from the corner of the hole-at an angle into the rafter.   Make plugs from the same material-glue and tap flush.  Make them out of other material or use dowels (grain change) for accent.

    Not way easier than the hidden tie, but it's pretty concealed (or not).

  • In a reply to concealed hardware for exposed rafters
    florida's picture
    1 day 22 hours ago

    I'm sure the engineer could spec a lag screw or two that would do the trick. Fast and cheap.

  • In a reply to concealed hardware for exposed rafters
    user-2875011's picture
    1 day 22 hours ago

    actually SE said any connection would do, but he didn't have any suggestion for easier concealed one...

  • In a reply to concealed hardware for exposed rafters
    calvin's picture
    1 day 23 hours ago

    There may be suggestions for more pleasing connections (no guarantee on how easy for your contractor), but if this roof frame was engineered and must comply with both the approved plans and the reasoning behind the connection, then you might be SOL

    Would your engineer have suggestions that would comply with his design criteria?  Worth a call.

    Best of luck.

  • In a reply to Hole in joist for wire
    renosteinke's picture
    2 days 15 min ago

    A true "Forstener" bit is a drill-press only tool. 

    Milwaukee makes a similar "Selfeed" bit, which has a pilot screw and will pull itself through. Irwin's SpeedBor Max bits (available in home centers) also drills real good through solid wood.

    I do not use either bit in a drill. The SpeedBor Max bits fit in any impact driver with the usual 1/4 hex collet. I have a special tool for the Milwaukee bits. An impact driver will also fit between most studs- something most drills won't do.

    If you're going to use a drill, ordinary "spade" bits will work just fine. Slow, but they'll work.

  • In a reply to Hole in joist for wire
    jyang949's picture
    2 days 37 min ago

    I'm using a Forstner bit in a cordless drill, and not making much progress. For one thing, it's hard to apply pressure when I'm reaching overhead and drilling a horizontal hole, with nothing to brace against.

    Is there a special bit for drilling holes through joists? Do I need an electric drill with more oomph? 

    Janet

  • In a reply to Main Line septic
    NHDigger's picture
    2 days 2 hours ago

    Maintain a minimum 1/4" per foot, or for easy math 2% pitch. No more than 15% pitch or the liquid will run away and leave the solids. Modern toilets only have 1.6 gallons of water or( ~13.34 pounds of force) to push the solids to the tank. Use nothing smaller than  4" diameter pipe.  Dont' worry about the frost line. If you compact the soil under the pipe and carefully dig (not over dig then fill) you will maintain a steady flow to the septic tank and there will be no standing water left to freeze in the pipe. The only time the material in that pipe will freeze if : 1) There is a belly sag in the pipe.  2) if the leach field has failed and won't take any more waste water ,therfore allowing standing water back up into the pipe. or 3) Some one (say a child or elderly person) uses an inordinate amount of toilet paper and causes a clog in the tank at the inlet baffle. Over the last 15 years I have installed over 300 septic tanks here in New Hampshire and most of the pipes are gravity flow and installed above frostline.  The only frozen wastewater pipes I have ever seen, were from circumstances described above. I hope this helps. Best wishes with your project.

  • In a reply to How do I store leftover: nails, nuts, bolts so that I can find them again?
    sapwood's picture
    2 days 7 hours ago

    I have a shelf unit on the wall of my shop that I built. This is made of 1/2" ply and has shelves that are only 4" deep. I store boxes of screws, nuts, washers, and similar items on this. For the most part, all are in the boxes of 100 each that I bought them in. I sort them according to size: # 4 through 14. All the boxes are labled and all the labels face outwards. Commonly used screws such as drywall screws are stored in open trays according to size. These are kept in a drawer near my work bench. When I have some leftover screws or whatever from a project and they are in a work tray or tool box I make a snap decision as to whether it is better to find the appropriate storage place or simply drop them into the trash. If I put them anywhere else, there they'll sit till hell freezes over. 

  • In a reply to roof sheathing with exposed soffits
    gecko's picture
    2 days 8 hours ago

     There is nothing wrong with that approach at all. In fact, I think I'm going to ask the framer to do it this way instead of using cedar shims/shingles as wedges.

    Thanks for your input!