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caters's picture

For when my momma, dad, and I go to new earth I have designed a house. I have even figured out the dimensions for each room.

Basement:
Laundry room: 18x10(y*x or x*y? I forget which but 18x10 and 10x18 are commutative)
Wine Cellar(also used for beer and other alcoholic drinks): 32x10
Den: 10x40
Workshop: 10x20
Cheese cellar: 20x10
Library: 20x30
Pantry: 20x30

The wine cellar is next to the cheese cellar, workshop, and laundry room and has a door to the laundry room and cheese cellar.

The laundry room is next to the wine cellar, workshop, and den and has a door to all 3 of these rooms.

The den is next to the laundry room, workshop, and library and has a door to the laundry room and workshop.

The workshop is next to the laundry room, wine cellar, cheese cellar, den, and library and has a door to all except the wine cellar.

The cheese cellar is next to the workshop, wine cellar, and pantry and has a door to all 3 rooms.

The library is next to the workshop, pantry, and den and has a door to all except the den.

The pantry is next to the cheese cellar and the library and has a door to both rooms.

How should I build this from the concrete foundation all the way to the ceiling and should I furnish it afterwards and not risk getting any paint or sawdust on it or should I furnish it before I put up the interior walls so that I know where everything goes?

Is there a way to improve the design I already have(I don't want open concept for this floor by the way. Only for the first floor do I want open concept)?

The electric for my house is a 1:1:1 hybrid of water power, solar power, and wind power so that we get electricity in almost every scenario.

What is your budget? Where (post #210409, reply #1 of 8)

What is your budget?

Where will you be building this house?

Your room sizes are no only very large for their functions but very long and narrow. A 10 X 40  den is not a very usable space.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 50 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

Since my momma, dad, and I (post #210409, reply #2 of 8)

Since my momma, dad, and I are going to new earth budget is not a concern since we will be building this ourselves.

 

More square footage is better than less which is why my dimensions are the way they are.

"Going to new earth" is not a (post #210409, reply #3 of 8)

"Going to new earth" is not a phrase that is meaningful to most here in the US.  Does it imply that you are "homesteading" -- moving to farm land that was previously unoccupied?


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

yes it does mean that I am (post #210409, reply #4 of 8)

yes it does mean that I am homesteading.

footprint ratio (post #210409, reply #5 of 8)

I don;t know if this is the type of reply you're looking for, but...

Building "conventionally" with straight walls, a square footprint will minimize your exterior walls verus the amount of footage you can get within those walls.

Example: a 40' by 40' footprint has 160 linear feet of exterior wall and 1600sqft of living space. That's 10 sqft of living space per foot of wall.

A 25' by 64' footprint also has 1600 sqft of living space, but it has 178 linear feet of exterior walls.  That's 9 sqft of living space per foot of exterior wall.

You lose energy through exterior walls, so if you're looking for net-zero or near to it, square can help. On the flip side, exterior walls can allow light through windows, but windows can lose energy. For net-zero, go LED bulbs all the way.

If your land slopes, you can cut into the slope and have an earth-bermed structure. In that case rectangular can help.

If you're mostly concerned with space allocation and planning, you can do what I did way back in the day. I drew out plans on paper. Then I got a few rolls of plastic landscaping tape. After tweaking with the design on paper, I went out onto a flat section of ground and with the plastic tape I layed out the footprint of the house, showing walls, doors, windows.  You can visualize your traffic flow.

When my wife and I were first married and had to transfer across the country and rent an apartment for the first year, we had to make sure our furniture would fit in the rooms before we leased any apartment. We taped up sheets of newspaper equal to the size of the furniture's footprints and layed them on the floor to see how things would fit and if we could get around things. It was ridiculously simply and amazingly helpful.


There are 10 kinds of people in this world; those who understand binary and those who do not.


Keep in mind that concrete (post #210409, reply #6 of 8)

Keep in mind that concrete costs money, is heavy, and is hard to transport.  If you're out in the "boonies" with this house, and you're trying to do it on a limited budget, you want to minimize the use of concrete.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

budget is not a main concern. (post #210409, reply #7 of 8)

budget is not a main concern. My dad is pretty handy and so is helping me build this house. My momma likes my current design and helped me choose reasonable sizes for all the rooms.

 

Some are large but I think that a 10x40 den is enough to function as an office, living room, and bedroom with enough room to go from 1 area to another easily.

 

On the first floor there is a living room, dining room, eat in kitchen, craft room/classroom, and a full bath.

 

On the second floor there is a master bedroom, master bathroom, walk in closet, office, hallway, 2 kids bedrooms, and a lab for me to do science experiments and research.