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Toilet disaster

jeff100's picture

I have discovered a leaking toilet that requires me to replace my bathroom floor. This toilet has been leaking for some time now, the wax seal failed around the drain. The material under the linoleum is soaked and ruined. This house was built in the early 70's, my guess is the ruined material is particle board. I'm demoing the floor down to the subfloor, drying out the subfloor as much as I can and building it back up. What is the best flooring for a bathroom? The only material I'm ruling out for now is carpet. Tile is an option, what is the best tile material for a bathroom? Hardwood flooring is another option if it's a viable material for bathroom environments. Lastly, I'm planning to put in a cement fiberboard over the subfloor and under the finish surface. I believe this is the right material for a tile floor, but will this material be a problem if I use hardwood flooring for the finish surface?

I believe this is the right (post #179836, reply #1 of 16)

I believe this is the right material for a tile floor, but will this material be a problem if I use hardwood

Lino, vinyl, ceramic are all usual and good. Used to be thought that the best in a bathroom was a seamless covering. Probably for those that don't like to clean.
Ceramic in itself is a cold material. Many put it down then cover it up with throw rugs to keep their toes warm. You can put electric radiant matts under it to warm it up in the winter.

HW, done it many times, but usually not the first choice. You need to do the toilet right or it will suck water like a sponge (almost like your pb underlay). Turn dark and rot.

Tub interface needs done right also.

But that goes with all surfaces really, just some are under the finish.....the underlay.

BUT, no cement board under the hardwood if nail down. Glue down? can't say, might work.

Best of luck.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


First things first, fix the (post #179836, reply #2 of 16)

First things first, fix the leak. One cause I've seen a lot is a heater pklaced to close to the toilet. It melts the wax ring and causes a leak

Most often a wax ring leak is (post #179836, reply #3 of 16)

Most often a wax ring leak is due to the toilet rocking, though certainly there are other causes.

Using a wax ring with the built-in "horn" goes a long way toward preventing future leaks.  And the new waxless seals have gotten fairly good reviews so far.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Fix the leak First.. (post #179836, reply #15 of 16)

I don't think so you need to replace whole bathroom floor to fix the leak in toilet. If any alternate is available to just fix the leak without replacing floor go for it. Hope condition is not too bad and you get solution.

Austin Wiseman likes different architectural columns designed and development. He shares his experiences of porch columns, baluster pedestal and pier caps from Australia at http://www.jcv.com.au

Toilet on wood flooring (post #179836, reply #4 of 16)

Toilet wax seals will eventually leak- No stopping that. The cement underlayment is a good plan but I would pause at putting hardwood floring on that. No matter what you do the area around the base of the toilet will get wet- Either cleaning, bad aim or leaking seal will eventually do the deed.

I would stick to tile, either vinyl or ceramic, stone, linoleum or manufacturer approved manufactured flooring. First I would apply a goodly amount of siliconized caulk under the foot print of the bowl as well as a heavy ring of caulk around the outside of the toilet flange before the bowl is set. After the bowl is set and secured put a bead of caulk around the base to make sure no liquid can creep under the bowl. I feel that you need belt, suspenders and the toilet gods all working for you in this venture.

Good luck!

(:-) WindwoodTrader In the Helderberg Mountains of NY

(:-) WindwoodTrader In the Helderberg Mountains of NY (post #179836, reply #5 of 16)

I have no idea where those mts are in NY, but this summers Breaktime Fest is in Saratoga Springs.  Good time, nice time to put this internet stuff into perspective.  Check it out in the Fest Folder.  Sign up!  It's in Mid July.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


use plumbers putty (post #179836, reply #6 of 16)

I would recommend you stay away from the silicone bead under the toilet.  I've replaced a few toilets that suffered the glue down of silicone and it makes removing and servicing a hassle should the need arise.  It's also a mess to clean up (sometimes almost impossible) especially if the floor has any type of textured tile.  This is important to note because when you replace a toilet that was glued down with silicone it is difficult to reseal because nothing will stick to where the silicone once was (including silicone itself).

I'd stick with the conventional plumbers putty around the perimeter of the base.  If the floor is level and flat and the wax seal is applied correctly and the bolts tightened down well enough a generous amount of plumbers putty will seal adequately.

Of course, there's no real (post #179836, reply #7 of 16)

Of course, there's no real need to use any sort of putty or caulk (though some inspectors seem to require it).  It helps a little if one is sloppy with a mop, but otherwise serves little good.  (If shimming is required something more substantial must be used.)

And be wary of using plumbers putty -- it will stain vinyl flooring and grout lines.  There used to be a specific toilet bedding putty, but I haven't seen it anywhere for about 45 years.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Plumbers Putty (post #179836, reply #8 of 16)

DanH:

>>>And be wary of using plumbers putty -- it will stain vinyl flooring and grout lines.  There used to be a specific toilet bedding putty, but I haven't seen it anywhere for about 45 years<<<

Agree with you 100%, that would be a dumb thing to put around a toilet, putty dries out, and it was about 45 years ago that it was banned for setting toilets.

"If all else fails, read the directions"

Good Grief! (post #179836, reply #9 of 16)

but I haven't seen it anywhere for about 45 years.

Dan, How the heck old are you?

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Younger than the mountains, (post #179836, reply #10 of 16)

Younger than the mountains, older than the trees.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

sorry but (post #179836, reply #11 of 16)

i dont know why you would put anything under or around the toilet. if it does leak and the water stays under there, you may not find out until you sit down one day and fall thru the floor! wouldnt it be better to see the leak right away? or were you all just kiddin around

Well, some people like to (post #179836, reply #12 of 16)

Well, some people like to caulk the toilet, in theory to keep dirt and water from running under it.  (I don't.)


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Plumbing codes require (post #179836, reply #13 of 16)

Plumbing codes require sealing between the fixture and the floor or wall. (UPC, section 407.2; IPC, section 405.5)

Many plumbers leave a small uncaulked part at the back to serve as a telltale in case of a leak.

Also, it is best to wait a few days before caulking to ensure there's no leak.

Latex caulk is preferable to silicone for the reasons already noted.

That may be code but I rarely (post #179836, reply #14 of 16)

That may be code but I rarely see it done.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Me neither..... (post #179836, reply #16 of 16)

and the inspectors here don't say anything about it.

Jim

Never underestimate the value of a sharp pencil or good light.