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Interior Door Design/Construction

toobguy's picture

Interior Door Design/Construction (post #207029)

New to this site & forum.  I am interested in building an interior door to replace an existing hollow core, standard size (32x80x1-3/8).  This will have a full length single light narrow fluted reed glass, so basically the wood will be the frame only to place the glass.  Reviewing some articles here I see a variety of joinery used - dowel, loose tenon, and tenon.  Not much on placing the glass.  Given the area is Central CA, I figure poplar will do - easy to machine and stable, and takes paint well - and reasonably priced (more so than mahogany or pine - and I will not use fir).

Any thoughts on joinery and/or glass placement would be appreciated, including pointing me to any visual design articles/books - I am more of a visual learner than by reading or listening.

Study the construction of any (post #207029, reply #1 of 5)

Study the construction of any "panel" style cabinet doors you may have.  Also, if you have any wood window sashes, look at those.  Basically, you continue the stile profile through the joint, so that it comprises part of a mortise&tenon.

But unlike a panel door you want to hold the glass in with glazing compound or a removable stop, vs building the frame around the panel.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Interior Door Design/Construction (post #207029, reply #2 of 5)

Thanks, Dan.  That has been my planned approach to this but it helps to have it reinforced.  I will go with a removable stop to hold the glass in place.  Do you reinforce the tenon joints (e.g., pinned) or simply go with the tenon and a good glue.  I am thinking Titebond since it is interior.

I've never actually done it, (post #207029, reply #3 of 5)

I've never actually done it, mind you.  But I suspect it depends on your confidence in your jointery techniques, and how well poplar will take the glue.  I have seen window sashes assembled this way where there's an added dowel.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

interior door design (post #207029, reply #4 of 5)

Just about any door company has an unfinished solid woodframe into which you can install your own glass design. The glass is held in with removable stops. Cost should be around $100. By the time you obtain the wood, glue, stops you will come close anyway. Also make sure you have enough "meat" in the styles (the woodframe) to install the lock. Also, the bottom style is usually 7" high

semar (post #207029, reply #5 of 5)

Bottom rail-stiles are the vertical members.

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