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Color with bad paint job

aimless's picture

I'm greedily devouring my new issue of IH when I come upon the cover article explaining color. Unfortunately, I have trouble reading it because the paint job on the purple room is so incredibly bad that my eye keeps getting drawn away from the words and to the brush strokes on that wall. I tried to convince myself that it was a paint technique, such as an attempt at the linen look, but as the strokes go around the corner of the door that self-delusion doesn't work. Plus the big, uneven gaps of white wall showing through near the base mold adds to the impression that this wall was not painted by a professional, nor even a careful DIY. How is a pretty color helpful if the quality of application is so distracting? Am I being too picky? Please tell me this is the latest style trend and I'm just behind the times, as usual.


By the way, nice article. I still haven't figured out why purple and green look good together, when they aren't complimentary  on the color wheel.

(post #175715, reply #1 of 9)

Purple and green is everywhere in model homes I have been looking through.


Haven't seen this issue, so can't comment.


 

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

(post #175715, reply #3 of 9)

I don't think I've ever been through a model home that was anything but white or builder's beige. How refreshing that you are seeing them with color! Maybe because of our different price ranges?


We ended up with green walls and purple trim in my daughter's room when I asked her what color she wanted her room.  She's 2, and I figure by the time she's 11 her tastes will change and we will repaint. For now, it's fun using off the wall colors in her room.


Contrary to good design principles that I read in magazines, my house has no unity in colors throughout. I like color and if I can play with a new color in a different room, then I do so. Hence, we have a dark green ceiling in one bedroom/office, light green walls and purple trim in my daughter's room, yellow walls and midnight blue ceiling in our room,  variations of peach in the sunroom, and the mural of the sea in the bathroom. I'm itching to get on with painting the family room, but other projects must be finished first. I s'pose I'll have to paint it all something boring when I try to sell the place.

(post #175715, reply #9 of 9)

How refreshing that you are seeing them with color!


Keep in mind though, the models are all a fire with color.


However, the inventory homes, are what you describe as, builder beige.


 

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

(post #175715, reply #2 of 9)

Aimless, I did notice that the paint in that room had a "just slap some paint on there" nonchallance, but I wasn't as bothered by it as you were.  Maybe that's because I'm a non-professional and a newbie myself.  What caught my eye was the fact thatthe second coat doesn't quite rech the ceiling in a few places, and there's a big gap at that point where the brush strokes go around the door frame.


The robin's egg blue room on the front cover and on page 37 was really reassuring to me.  Close inspection reveals that the wall paint does not join the ceiling paint with razor-sharp precision.  But I think it looks great.  So that's reassuring to me as I go through my marathon of repainting my house. FWIW, I get better at those joins with every room I paint.


I also liked the article.  I just used big bold colors for my children's rooms and I'm getting more comfortable with both working and living with color.  I will not be painting any rooms orange, though.  I heard a TV show designer say that "orange is this year's brown."  Blather.  Orange is orange, regardless of the year.


 

If a woman is to have a well-kept home, she must have power tools and a tool shed to call her own.

(post #175715, reply #4 of 9)

How did the stripes work out?

(post #175715, reply #5 of 9)

The stripes are great.  I want to do a "report" but pictures are holding me up.  I've got to go get a disposable camera and have pictures developed on disc.  We have a small digital camera that my father gave to my son, but my husband still hasn't fixed the USB port that we need to make it workable. 

 

If a woman is to have a well-kept home, she must have power tools and a tool shed to call her own.

(post #175715, reply #6 of 9)

We painted our breakfast room and part of the kitchen orange - actually we were going for a terra cotta red, and the colour we chose leans heavily towards the yellow end of the spectrum (making it -- well, orange, actually!) Anyhow, the colour is wonderful - it's one of those magical colours that changes ever so subtlely depending on the light, the angle, the time of day. From some angles it's a warm rose, and from others a deeply intriguing terra cotta, and from others just orange. The "given" in our kitchen was that the cabinetry, a deep green, stays, and does not get repainted. The orange works surprisingly well against the green. So despite the blather of a TV decorator, this really can be a wonderful, warm, welcoming colour in the right application.

"[T]he illiteracy level of our children are appalling."— George W. Bush, Washington, D.C., Jan. 23, 2004

"And then, because of the transitive reactive Halstead-era seizing properties of the Aboriginal Double Humpback Turtle, I thought, what if I add one teaspoon of clarified monkey paste?" Anonymous blog comment on "America's Test Kitchen"

(post #175715, reply #7 of 9)

I have a partially orange kitchen because I haven't had the wherewithal to get scaffolding together and repaint up near the ceiling.  After getting my (6'3") husband's help with that job once, I insist on doing it myself.  But I'm under five feet tall and I have this little "fear of heights" thing.  So above the cabinets my kitchen is still the orange color the last owner used.  It's a dark sort of orange.  I think of it as burnt pumpkin pie filling.  Like my kitchen was the victim of some unspeakable Thanksgiving baking disaster.  So I do have orange in my house, but I didn't put it there.  And now my next door neighbor and I own identical ladders that can be combined to make scaffolding, so the burnt pumpkin will soon be history.


Oh, I'm sure that orange is wonderful in other people's houses.  My daughter likes orange, and is thinking about painting her apartment orange.  More power to her, now that she doesn't live in my house.  As you say, orange is one of those colors that changes.  In my house, it would change to unacceptable.


 

If a woman is to have a well-kept home, she must have power tools and a tool shed to call her own.

(post #175715, reply #8 of 9)

As you say, orange is one of those colors that changes.  In my house, it would change to unacceptable.


I can relate to that. In my home I have similar feelings about blue.


"[T]he illiteracy level of our children are appalling."— George W. Bush, Washington, D.C., Jan. 23, 2004

"And then, because of the transitive reactive Halstead-era seizing properties of the Aboriginal Double Humpback Turtle, I thought, what if I add one teaspoon of clarified monkey paste?" Anonymous blog comment on "America's Test Kitchen"