Subscribe or Renew Membership Subscribe Renew

Leaky Anderson 1961 Slider windows

kyje's picture

Hello,

I have multiple Andersen 1961 Slider windows.

Quite a few of them leak under the window throught the track that the windows slide in.

I don't know where the weep holes are located on these windows, could someone advise where they might be?

Andersen came in advised it would $20,000 to replace them all.  Not gonna happen for that price.

 

Thank you,

Kyle

Where ever you want (post #206308, reply #1 of 16)

They are obviously out of warranty. 

So, I'd just get one of the long drill bits, and drill some weep holes.   Make the holes a little over size so you can pull a paint soaked rag on a string through them a few times, and you should be good to go. 

Weep holes (post #206308, reply #2 of 16)

Would there have been weep holes from the manufacturer or installer?

Where do I drill the hole too without it dripping down the insisde of the wall?

Thank you,

Kyle

The weep holes should be on (post #206308, reply #3 of 16)

The weep holes should be on the bottom edge of each vertical track. Whatever you do do NOT drill new weep holes through the window frame. It's possible that the caulking in the corners is leaking which is nearly impossible to fix. Can you post a picture?

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 50 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

It's not clear -- are these (post #206308, reply #4 of 16)

It's not clear -- are these windows that slide horizontally, or some variant on a double-hung vertical sliding window?

For horizontal sliders with a track at the bottom, there should be weep holes through the edge of the track to the outside.  These holes would run almost horizontally, not down into the framing.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Windows (post #206308, reply #5 of 16)

They are horizontal sliders with a twist handle in the middle.

They are large about 4 feet high.

 

The water just comes right in under the windows.

 

Thank you,

Kyle

Are there any rubber gaskets (post #206308, reply #6 of 16)

Are there any rubber gaskets that are missing/broken/worn?  Andersen sells replacement gaskets, et al, for some pretty old windows.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Kyle (post #206308, reply #7 of 16)

Go to Andersen's website and "attem't" to look for an install pdf or perhaps parts for your window. 

They used to have a way to look up even some of their early windows and I was lucky enough to stumble on it.   Then, I called Andersen and talked to someone in service/parts and we walked through the problem I was having finding the correct OLD hardware for a casement.

I know of the window style you have and while unusual (in that they ride in a sweeping track), were very slick when introduced.  I'm not familiar with the working parts and / or whether they had gasketing on them so I'm not much help.

But, the drawings in front of you and a tech (older if you can find one) should be a big help.

Best of luck.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Here's the sheet for your (post #206308, reply #8 of 16)

Here's the sheet for your windows:  http://www.andersenwindows.com/homeowner...

It's a bit hard to interpret the sectional drawing, however.  (Further confused by having old wood screens shown installed.)  Apparently with this style the two sashes sit flush with each other when fully closed, but the right side moves toward the indoors as you open it.  (Is this correct for your windows?)

If you do have wood screens in place, they definitely need weep holes.  They were no doubt there at one time and likely got painted over.

Beyond that, there appears to be a seal just on the outside of the sashes, at the bottom.  This may need small (about 1/8") weep holes (drilled from the outside, with the screen/storm removed) if they aren't already present (which they should be).

Weep holes should be about 4" from each end and then every foot or so.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Thanks (post #206308, reply #9 of 16)

Armed with that, they should be able to talk to a service person to see if there's a weatherstrip that could be damaged or missing and the proper locations for original drip holes.  If the screens were added later, then they'll have to troubleshoot that install.

 

Those window when working properly were easy to open/shut.  Time and paint does weird things.  I remember the tracks made of a composite material so wear was minimal there.

The way they draw up when latched, you'd suspect a bead of some sort between the sash.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Screens (post #206308, reply #10 of 16)

I have metal framed screens they hook into the frame of the windows with 2 latches at the bottom.

 

There are weep holes in the metal just in front of where the right hand window closes into.

 

There is no weatherstripping, only thin metal that has to bent into place to try slow the breeze.

 

I will review the drawings.

 

Thank you,

Kyle

kyle (post #206308, reply #11 of 16)

Have you called Andersen?   Do that and talk to someone in parts or service-have those drawings Dan found for you on the screen.  Hopefully between the two of you, you can find some cause for this that we can't see.

 

Have there been any changes to siding, etc that might have caused a change allowing this leak to turn up?

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


No changes to the siding (post #206308, reply #12 of 16)

No changes to the siding since I have owned it.

Previous owners didn't disclose anything.

 

I will call Andersen as soon as I can.

Kyle (post #206308, reply #13 of 16)

come back with a report if you would.

It's been years since I even moved one of those windows back and forth.  I cannot remember any particulars about  the weatherproofing parts and would like to have the info also in case I get a call about them.

 

The 20's casements I was working on-and a rep from Andersen helped me find the correct parts-were to be kept in working order in the still mint condition home.  Luckily, all parts were still available.

thanks and best of luck.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Solution Found? (post #206308, reply #16 of 16)

Hi Kyje,

I'm having the same problem with some of my vintage Andersen Prime Gliding Windows (c. late 1950s).  I get rain water infiltrating through the bottom in moderate to heavy storms.  Of the four window sets, those with the greatest exposure to the elements are having the greatest issues.

Did you ever identify a solution to your issue?

Many thanks.

John