Subscribe or Renew Membership Subscribe Renew

How to build indoor stone veneer wall

frank1977's picture

Hi

How do I build a stone veneer wall, from soup to nuts, in my living room?  Thank you

Sincerley,

 

Fabio S., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Any way you want. There are (post #207651, reply #1 of 8)

Any way you want.

There are probably a dozen different technologies, from the same inches-thick "veneer" that's used externally to several "synthetic" stone alternatives that are light and thin.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Thanks DanH (post #207651, reply #2 of 8)

DanH

My biggest stumbling block is how do I actually build the structure which will support the veneer wall.  I want to make sure that I comply with building codes and also make something that wont fall apart in 3 years.  I have seen so many videos on-line about how to build such a wall, and all of them seem to promote a different method.  I am just confused about the steps I need to take to actual build the frame that will support the wall and what methods to use in putting the veener on.  Thanks

Fabio

Well, for the lightweight (post #207651, reply #3 of 8)

Well, for the lightweight stuff you just need to build a regular wall.  For the full monty you need something resembling a brick ledge.  You have to choose your technology first.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

fab (post #207651, reply #4 of 8)

It's important for you to build for the material you are going to use.

Show the product you are planning on.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


+1 (post #207651, reply #5 of 8)

Wieght can be signifcent with synthetic stone.

 Building a wall  to support it over top of a basement or crawl space could also introduce structural loads that need to be accounted for. 

I've got about 300 sq. ft. of ledger stone sitting behind my shop, in the original boxes.  One box was all my little JD 970 wanted to lift and back down the hill with.  I'm guessing about 1200 to 1500 lbs. for a lttle over 100 square feet.  That would be just a littel over an 8' x 8' wall. Not something I would add anywhere without figureing out the load paths.

Exterior wall? (post #207651, reply #7 of 8)

First off, I beleive most real stone veneer comes in between 8 and 12 lb / sq foot.  Do teh math.  Secondly, If your wall is an exteror wall I don't think you should have any problem, regardless of the direct of the floor joist.  Think about it.  An exterior wall holds your entire roof load, adding 100 pounds per linear foot of wall is no big deal.  Now an interior wall which is not directly or "very close to directly" over a support wall below, would be a different issue.

.

interior stone veneer wall (post #207651, reply #8 of 8)

 How do I build a stone veneer wall, from soup to nuts, in my living room?

First things first, as others have noted: Check that your floor is capable of bearing the added weight (requires an understanding of dead and live loads and basic math skills). Make structual remedies in the basement/crawl space as needed. You may or may not need a support structure down there. The location of your wall relative to the foundation wall or some other load-bearing structure, the span of your floor joists, and the material from which they are made need to be considered. If in doubt, beef up the area. An ounce of prevention....

Frame a wall, 16" oc. and secure it well. Cover with screwed drywall or plywood. Add a second layer of 1/2" cementous backer board (Hardi brand comes to mind but there are others). Thinset and/or screw it in place (use the recommended screws!). There are other ways to create  stone-appropriate backer, but my suggestion is staightforward.

Take your time to lay out and install the stone. Be sure to select from several boxes at the same time. If working from the bottom up, be carefull not to get mortar unto the stone. Sometimes we seal our stone (face only) prior to installation. We use a wet saw to make cuts, but you can get by with a hand-held tool (grinder). Dust will be an issue. It's hard to know what cutting tool(s) to recommend w/o knowing what product is being installed.

Be careful when you grout. You don't want grout on the stone, and if it does get on the face of the stone, avoid creating a haze when you clean it off. This is one reason we seal prior to grouting. I use a power grouting tool, but a simple "cake decorating bag" and strong wrists will do the trick.

Mel Fros froscarpentry.com

PreviewAttachmentSize
Moms_contractors.jpg
Moms_contractors.jpg20.57 KB