Search the forums

Loading

Paint Ceiling to Match Walls?

etherhuffer's picture

We have a 70's barker we are updating. The walls have all been smoothed and the popcorn deleted. Praise the lord! But now, we are trying to decide whether to do the ceilings in 1/4 tone of the walls, white, or same as the walls.


Our colors of sage are not dark, but not too light. We are concerned that sage all the way around will be 'green overload". We have cherry cabinets and bamboo(blond)floors. What do people think? Its driving me nuts with indecision on this one, all and any slings or arrows much appreciated. We are going for a modern but not cold look.


Those who can make you believe in absurdities can make you commit atrocities- Voltaire

 

(post #175871, reply #1 of 13)

Since you haven't gotten any replies yet: I have always liked white ceilings because they reflect light well and make the room seem bigger. That is kind of a traditional look though. Your idea of lightening the sage color to be a quarter tone of the walls would probably look good and be a little more modern looking. I was painting the inside of a house once and the lady convinced me to paint one room and hall just one shade on the color chart diffferent than the other room. It was impossible to see any difference in the tones, they were so close. But several tones lighter for the ceilings would look good, I think. You may see if anyone at Breaktime has an opinion on this too.


BTW, I think the sage colored walls with cherry cabinets must really look good! I like to use complementary colors.

(post #175871, reply #2 of 13)

Good Day.


Two thoughts -


1. I would use the quarter tone.  I live in a sage house, where every room is the same color - different sheens and types of paint depending on the use of the room - we have white ceilings and white trim - but it would hae been interesting to have used the quarter tone and equally as effective.


2. Most of these rooms that had popcorn ceilings are going to show imperfections in the drywall/tapeing job!  So be careful!  You may want to introduce a cornice molding - either traditional or contemporary - which will draw your eye further down the wall and allow for a true straight edge for the break in the tow colors - white or quarter tone

(post #175871, reply #3 of 13)

Thanks so much for both replies. We think white will be too stark and the room look too color blocky(?). We are doing a wall section around a fireplace in Venetian plaster to approximate the reddish cherry. With white, red, sage its all blocks. With quarter tone on the ceiling, It might cut this down a little yet not get dark.


BTW, Eggshell on the paint. The popcorn is gone, all new drywall and new mud. Its flat and smooth as a polished table. Sooooo nice. Death to popcorn!


Those who can make you believe in absurdities can make you commit atrocities- Voltaire

 

(post #175871, reply #4 of 13)

When we first moved into this house, we painted the master bedroom with white walls and a green ceiling, and really like it. Yes, I know that is the reverse of the traditional. But when I went to Europe I saw castles with white plaster walls and painted wood or plaster ceilings. I liked the look. I like it even more in my home.  When I sit in the dark of the room with a reading lamp the ceiling disappears.


The next room we painted had color on the walls and 2 tones darker on the ceiling. I get complements from pretty much everybody who walks into the room.  This was a public room and the room does not feel at all cramped. We've continued to experiment with color in this house and we have yet to dislike a color choice. Of course there are a few more rooms to go, but what the heck - it's paint.


Go ahead and paint the lighter sage on the ceiling. The worst that can happen is that you end up repainting.

(post #175871, reply #5 of 13)

I think you are right. The only catch is a bad back on my part and then hiring a painter. If he does what we ask, no problem. Our subs have been from the devil.

Those who can make you believe in absurdities can make you commit atrocities- Voltaire

 

(post #175871, reply #6 of 13)

I was leaning toward white ceilings, but upon working with a decorator, I learned the look I was trying to achieve would be to tint the white ceiling paint with green to blend with the light sage green walls.  Looks great with medium color cherry cabinets & tile floor.  Used same sage colors in dining room; wished I had used this more.


In rooms with a tint of yellow; white ceiling paint was also tinted a faint yellow - not all white.  Truly makes white woodwork stand-out alone!


GOOD LUCK!

(post #175871, reply #7 of 13)

From all the folks I talk to, quarter strength tint seems to be the choice. With sage, we feared that the room would be a green overload!

Those who can make you believe in absurdities can make you commit atrocities- Voltaire

 

(post #175871, reply #8 of 13)

Just thought I would mention this to you - our drywall has just been completed by the best drywallers/finishers available and they highly recommend that flat paint be used on the ceiling if you choose a non popcorn finish. Not only will lighting show any slight imperfection, the lumber used for framing nowadays varies slightly in widths. I plan on using a shade lighter on my ceiling than what I'm using on the walls too - the look is fantastic and not so traditional, but classic. 

(post #175871, reply #9 of 13)

Our drywall was a big deal, as our roof was underdesigned. The popcorn and drywall came off. Then bracing the roof. Then new drywall and mud. It is really flat and smooth, and near a west facing slider, so yes, it has to be flat paint!

Those who can make you believe in absurdities can make you commit atrocities- Voltaire

 

(post #175871, reply #10 of 13)

Not a fan of non white ceilings, traditionalist, I guess. Sage is a pretty strong color, so I'd be careful. I always have ALL white paint I use, whether trim, ceiling,etc., with a splash of brown. My local Porter paint store calls it 1/2 T. or 2T, depending. It really warms the white and gives it a rich look.

(post #175871, reply #11 of 13)

Benjamin Moore makes a "china white"  that is more subdued than stark white. By using that, it will connect with the sage a little better. So that is fine on the doors, then the 1/4 tone on the ceiling is not white-white and thus too bright against the china white. Whew! The painter is crying his eyes out and not wanting to do the work. I guess you can have as "many colors as you want" on a bid as long as that means "two"!

Those who can make you believe in absurdities can make you commit atrocities- Voltaire

 

(post #175871, reply #12 of 13)

I had my spare bedroom painted a med. blue on the walls and a lighter blue on the ceiling. I love it that way. The way I see it, for a bedroom, you lie down and look up, so why not look at something decorative?
Of course, colors ARE subjective. You could try painting a patch and living with it awhile like the decorators suggest. That is, if you have the time.

(post #175871, reply #13 of 13)

Would okra be a nice shade? :-)

Those who can make you believe in absurdities can make you commit atrocities- Voltaire