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Denshield installed in deckmud

dubd's picture
I am new to the form and wish I would have come across this earlier.

I recently completed installation of my poured shower pan, but unfortunately did install the denshield material into the last layer of deck mud in the pan. It is in the mud approximately 1-1/2" and there is shower water proofing membrane that rolls up behind this section. After some research, everything I have read has indicated the denshield should be above the top layer of mud.

I have attached a picture of the pan. And unfortunately the bottom seam has been taped already.

I am wondering if it is absolutely necessary to tear out the denshield that is submerged in the deckmud or it heavily caulking or waterproofing this area would be acceptable. If needed I will remove, but I hate to risk damaging my pan if there is another alternative to tearing out the denshield.

I’ve seen several questions about this subject, so hoping maybe others on the forum may have come across this before and have found a better solution than tearing it out.

Thanks,

Looks like a nice job so far (post #207425, reply #1 of 5)

Looks like a nice job so far so rather than gamble I'd dig it out. The tile is going to leak and the drypack will be saturated with water eventually. if you don't get the Denshield out it could cause mold problems down the line. Dry pack is relatively soft so getting the Denshield out and patching it back should not be a big job.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

Thanks for the reply. I have (post #207425, reply #2 of 5)

Thanks for the reply. I have decided that it wasn't worth the risk of the denshield failing in the future so I took out the bottom sections over the weekend, and packed the voids with new deck mud. I"m planning on water proofing all edges of the denshield and rehanging these pieces over the pan this week.

Better safe than sorry. You (post #207425, reply #3 of 5)

Better safe than sorry. You could paint it all with Red Guard as an insurance policy.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 40 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

Painting it with red guard is (post #207425, reply #4 of 5)

Painting it with red guard is a nice idea.

Faint (post #207425, reply #5 of 5)

Agreed. Painting with red guard is a good idea but I think the red guard looses its shine very quickly.