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Is this seam in middle of sink acceptable? Too wide and crooked?

729zoom's picture

 Our marble countertops are almost installed and so far everything is ok except that the sink cut out was made too big in the front (so the sink reveal is not the same in the front as is it in the back) and there is a seam right in the middle of the sink that is very visible from across the room. Attaching close up picture and one from about 3' away. 

I sent the picture to the contractor and he says this will all be fixed, that they are not finished. But I am not sure possible? 

 

I am interested in hearing from pros on what would be possible, what is considered acceptable by industry standards and what can be done to fix this.

 

Posting pictures of before they glued (when I was first told not to worry) and after they glued close up and about 3' away - it is very noticible.   

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I don't think the glue held (post #214722, reply #1 of 6)

I don't think the glue held very well -- the pictures fell off.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

If that were my own DIY it (post #214722, reply #2 of 6)

If that were my own DIY it would be a tear out and start over - same for you,  unless the contractor has some good diamond grinding and polishing tools/equipment. 

Should have gotten Cambria -- (post #214722, reply #3 of 6)

Should have gotten Cambria -- the seams are just about invisible, and you wouldn't need to have a joint right in the middle of the sink.

But the main problem with that joint is that they botched the machining of the right side.  Left a gap in there and apparently didn't make the two sides match very well.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

not great, but passably OK (??)...sigh (post #214722, reply #4 of 6)

Some things to consider:  You don't want a C-top joint at a vulnerable location.  There is virtually no support for the C-top at the front end of the sink base. This is asking for trouble. If the sink base had a face frame with center style (vertical member) that would add a bit of support and would, maybe, allow the installer to beef up the area. But that is not the case here. Not sure what the metal rod up front is. Might that be something the contractor installed to strengthen a weak area in the design?

A sink full of water and dishes is quite heavy. You don't want moisture and/or grime to get into the c-joint. The contractor may have wanted to hide the joint, but this is not the place for it....sigh.  A good joint across the depth of the c-top  is pleasing to the eye. Further more, I place backers below my joints,so they are fully supported across the depth of the cabinet.

The sink can't be centered front to back due to the location of the faucet and because of cabinet carcass considerations. In most of my installations the sink sits further to the front than back. However, if the faucet hole(s) is within the sink proper, then a centering front to back may be possible.

Nothing can be done to "fix this" situation short of a re-ordering of the top, with the seam placed away from the sink. However, the contractor will more than likely be able to achieve a reasonably well-looking seam. It will always remain vulnerable to cracking and/or breakage. Those are my thoughts. Others may disagree. For a costly product like this you expect the very best design. Sadly, this did not happen.

Mel Fros froscarpentry.com

Of course it's not (post #214722, reply #5 of 6)

Of course it's not acceptable. I've never, ever, seen a seam in the middle of s sink like that. Reputable stone dealers cut a large enough piece to do either the whole top or as much as possible without a seam. If that's any indication of the rest of the job I'd want my money back.

Florida Licensed Building Contractor, 45 years experience in commercial remodeling, new homes, home remodeling and repairs and all types building maintenance.

Of course, the problem was (post #214722, reply #6 of 6)

Of course, the problem was that the guy didn't think he could cut the hole in the piece and wrestle it in there without breaking it.  There may be some "circumstances" that made this more of a problem (eg, a tight fit on both ends, or the need to wrestle the piece up the stairs), but reasonably competent installers should be able to figure it out, except in extreme situations.

I know that when they installed our Cambria top the piece was shipped from the shop with the opening not completely cut, and they finished the cutting in the driveway.  Then they attached a strongback to the piece before hauling it in.  I would assume that a stone installer has similar techniques.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville