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To Vent or not to Vent the cooktop

Tisme's picture

 

I am (finally) going to replace my gas cooktop with electric, but don't have room for a vent/down draft.

Do I have to have venting for an electric cooktop?  Sales lady at the store says insurance requires it - opposing salesman says no.

Anyone know for sure? 

I don't have room for a separate vent, and the touch control styles don't seem to have venting.

Thanks for any input.

Clarify please -- was your (post #205484, reply #1 of 7)

Clarify please -- was your gas cooktop vented, and, if so, how?

Not that I approve of them, but there are a lot of unvented range hoods available/installed.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

Not likely any inspectors (post #205484, reply #2 of 7)

Not likely any inspectors will be coming to an existing house and busting you. It's not gas vs electric, it's what you cook. The first time you burn something, fry some pork chops, steam some broccoli, you'll wish you had a vent. Non vented range hoods will take out some of the odors and smoke but they don't compare to exterior venting. Better than nothing, just remember to clean the filters regularly.

Beat it to fit / Paint it to match

To Vent or not to Vent a cooktop (post #205484, reply #3 of 7)

I'm with Hammer1 on this.  Cooking is a major source of poor indoor air quality.  Besides odors (think about broiled fish), moisture can be a major problem if your house is anywhere near modern standards of tightness.  While it can be a pain, venting to outdoors is best.  Is your cooktop on an outside wall or is it in an island where you'd need a down-draft vent?

Bob

Duluth, MN

On the end of Lake Superior

Venting a cooktop (post #205484, reply #4 of 7)

 

My existing gas cooktop is down vented - had to do a "side duct" conversion because I have drawers underneath.

It's in an island configuration about 5' from a window.  As for odors, this cooktop has never eliminated or even diminished odors from cooking.  In retrospect, I wish I had thought about  some sort of air quality recirculation system.  The builder didn't mention it, and being the first house I've designed, I missed it.  One of those lessons learned.  We built the house 12 years ago, "tight" and high "R" rating for discounted mortgage rate.  Being in Alaska at latitude 61, humidity is very rarely a problem.

My mother boasts about cooking for a family of seven for 25 years on an island cooktop without ventilation............

Bottom line, if I admit it, is that I am driven to get rid of the @#($8&@#(*$ gas and have a clean, smooth, easy-to-clean surface preferrably *without knob*s, and this really limits my choices.  This isn't a magazine feature grandiose kitchen (I often wonder who really cleans all those gas stoves).   I have limited space.

Thanks for all the comments - any more, I'm listening...........

We have a vented micro above....... (post #205484, reply #5 of 7)

never use it.

 

We love the smells of cooking.  Door openings in the winter for dog walking, firewood bringing and the etc.............seem to change the air fine.

Admittedly, after 21 yrs there is a bit of "grime" on the cabs around the stove-but that's why we have cleaner (now all we have to do is use it).

 

Could you go up (didn't reread the first post) and over using a joist space above, to get outside?    There are several decent looking hoods meant for an island application.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/

 


Well, as the existence of (post #205484, reply #6 of 7)

Well, as the existence of unvented range hoods demonstrates, code doesn't require a vent in many parts of the country.  You can check what code requires in your area, and then do as you please, observing code to the extent you feel it's necessary.


Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed.  --Herman Melville

The part I like is......... (post #205484, reply #7 of 7)

insurance requires it.

A Great Place for Information, Comraderie, and a Sucker Punch.

Remodeling Contractor just outside the Glass City.


http://www.quittintime.com/